Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

A key signature change is different from out of key notes. Very commonly you will find extra accidentals like for example Bb in a C major piece or Db in C minor. Even if it follows a chord progression you will still find extra accidentals. A key signature change is notated on the staff like this: This is very different as then you are completely changing ...


0

Have you learnt the major blues? That makes it much more upbeat and cheerful than when you play with a standard blues scale. To do this, play the blues scale whose tonic is the 6th of the key you're currently in. For example: For the 12 bar blues in C, play with the A blues scale. For the 12 bar blues in Eb, play with the C blues scale. Hopefully the ...


2

What should I be able to do before I start learning anything blues or jazz related? You should be able to play the chords smoothly through the traditional I-IV-V blues progression in E,A,D,and G with a drum track. Then turn on your iPod and start playing along with simple blues music - Muddy Waters is a great blues artist to start with. His music is ...


3

While teachers and self-study are excellent ways to learn anything, when it comes to learning the blues, I believe you can profit greatly by finding someone who is just a little bit better than you, and just sit down and play together. While the form has evolved over time to embrace real sophistication, it started as a type of folk music. Playing three ...


1

Listen a lot of jazz/blues songs you like. This will get the sound in your ears. Not Just guitar or piano, but more instruments (miles Davis, trumpet-charlie parker, sax- wes montgomery,guitar etc.) Also get your theory right. A simple twelve bar blues Also has theory behind the three chords. Understanding This can be your first steps into a jazz blues. It ...


2

There are plenty of upbeat 12 bar blues songs, e.g.: Many of the songs Little Richard wrote (although they may not be suitable in a church context either ;-), e.g. ...


2

The problem with a question like this is that "Blues" is just a word, and when you use a word, it means whatever you want it to mean. In some fields, some words have very well-defined formal meanings, but the field of giving names to styles of music is generally vauge and informal. One person might have the firm belief that if you take a loping slide guitar ...


5

I suspect the confusion might be in what "Blues" means: Blues is a comment on the feel of a piece of music, rather than necessarily its structure. It's very common of course for blues songs to use the 12-bar chord progression (which is thought to have arisen from slaves singing while working in America), but not exclusively. Exceptions: For eaxmple "Need ...


1

Well, I remember some blues, cannot find the source right now, that was about somebody whose girl left him and that ended somewhat like "Gonna walk down to the railroad put my head right on the track yeah gonna walk down to the railroad an lay my head right on the track when that old train is a-coming Im gonna pull my head right back." Now that's the ...


3

Yes! While blues often deals in hardship, that’s not universal. Early blues were often comical or raunchy. Songs like Led Zeppelin’s “The Lemon Song” continue that tradition. And some blues are downright joyous like Stevie Ray Vaghan’s “Pride and Joy,” or pure fun like the old standard “Jump Jive and Wail.” The common thread in blues is that it’s very ...


3

This is not meant to be harsh in any way, I'm just examining possibilities… We start from not knowing what you actually do sound like. Presumably, as you can play an instrument, you can also hit roughly the right note when singing [though it's not a guarantee, it's a fair bet]. Trouble is, without hearing you, no-one can say whether it's because you just ...



Top 50 recent answers are included