New answers tagged

3

~The Chorus~ Chorus is awesome! Thanks to its over use in the 1960's, it's sound can make a whole song sound bluesy. The Walrus Audio Julia is the best chorus that I know of and is also the most vintage sounding, which is essential for a chorus to sound bluesy. ~The overdrive~ A light overdrive is all you need for jazz :). Not too much drive to kill the ...


0

A good way to practice would be to come up with an arbitrary chord progression in whatever key you like(eg. 1-4-5 in a major key). Loop that sequence. Then try and hit the "target notes" that make up each chord as they are played. Not saying you should be arpeggiating, but practice jumping notes on the scale and soloing while ending on a target note as each ...


2

Without wanting to sound too abstract, I'd recommend learning guitar solos from musicians you enjoy listening too, then try to copy their ideas into your own improvisation. I think what is key is developing your "musical ear" where you can hear in your head what you want to play and know how to translate that onto the guitar. This takes many years of ...


3

In the end you can use pretty much any arbitrary scales, switch between them and still sound awesome, as long as there's tasteful structure to it. For example if the song is currently in E minor, try putting in some phrases in D, F, F# or G major diatonic scales, but regularly return to the familiar Em pentatonic. My general advice would be to listen to ...


8

Minor pent works well over major chords, but not vice versa. Add the 'blue' note to both maj. and min. pents for a little spice. Try the full major scale notes on major songs. Try the full minor scales (3 of them!) on minor songs. Use the Mixolydian mode for major songs. Use the Dorian mode for minor songs. Use the Lydian mode for major songs. On major songs ...


1

Scales tend to reflect reality. It's not that someone once came up with a theory from thin air. Notes that sound good together get put together in ascending/descending order to be called scales. To an extent it's what humans do. Then players can think along the lines of 'if I want that sound, I can use that set of notes and it'll largely work'. The Blues ...



Top 50 recent answers are included