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17

You need to understand, that there is a reason, why many good books, teachers and methods put so much theory into their teaching. A good foundation of music theory will give you freedom, to play whatever you like. There is nothing more exiting than to have a full set of tools on hand and to know how to use them. I think that it is not so hard to learn 4-6 ...


11

You can try to soften the spine by opening it in various locations and flexing the book gently. (Here's a nice version of the procedure, with diagrams, even; and here's another, similar graphic, this one from a bookbinder.) If that doesn't work, you can get a piece of clear plastic and leave it over the pages; not an ideal solution, but it will let you use ...


11

The basics of music theory are the same across instruments. Notes, scales, chords, transposition, harmony, etc. are all intrument-independent at the theory level. I would not worry about finding a guitar-specific book until you have mastered the basics.


9

If you could make photocopies of the pieces you need without damaging the books (the spine, most likely), that would probably be best.


7

These are the books & online resources I like, and these go way beyond basic tricks. Book: Theory of Harmony by Arnold Shoenberg Shoenberg is one of the most influential composers of 20th century. This book raises some fundamental questions about music. See also: Structrual Functions of Harmony Books: Walter Piston's Counterpoint, ... (actually, this ...


6

Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" is quite popular, and very thorough. If you have classical theorical background, you will definitely be able to peruse it. It is however not meant as a course, more like a reference text. Jazz Theory Ressources by Bert Ligon (3 vol) is also a nice introduction.


6

Short answer: No. The difference you see in the sheet music is that for guitar you use the G clef and pianos use both the G and F clefs. This is not much of a difference except for the visual part. The notes are notes all the same. You can learn to read piano music in 5 minutes to know the F clef plus a week to get used to it. About composing, if you don't ...


6

Here's some food for thought... It can help to learn new practice techniques. Are you practicing these pieces from beginning to end each time? Maybe mix it up. Here are some ideas: Practice slowly. Really exaggerate this. Practicing is largely about muscle memory and the only way to get that is by taking your time. Record yourself and then take a break ...


6

Ok fella, I took a look here's your review. First: technical exercises are dull. Simple. Liszt is said to have done them while reading a book. Call me closed-minded if you will, but someone who claims to have "fixed" this problem hasn't. Here are some claims made on the site, with my comments in italics: Practicing the intermediate, virtuoso, and ...


4

I use clothespins to keep the pages open. :D


4

Book spines are intended to keep the book in its closed shape. As they age and are repeatedly opened, they start to stay open because the spine gets damaged. If you're careful, bending and folding won't make it any worse than the "natural" damage over time. Another option is to cut out the spine altogether. You could punch holes in the margins and use a ...


4

Matthew's answer is correct. Music theory is sort of the science of how notes work together. It does not differ from instrument to instrument. Here are a few resources to get you started. Introduction to Muisc Theory Recommended Music Theory Online Tutors


4

Perhaps there is a 'best practice' (no pun intended) for learning in terms of cognitive science1, but I don't know of any such studies regarding music. In lack of such knowledge I believe it depends on your goals and motives for playing, as well as your personality (such as if you are impatient or stubborn etc). Further, different people learn best in ...


3

The best jazz theory book is Berklee Jazz Harmony by Barrie Nettles. You can get it from this blog http://davidvaldez.blogspot.com/2006/04/berklee-jazz-harmony-1-4.html When you are done with it you can continue with Mark Levine's The Jazz Theory Book! Highly recommended! http://www.jazzbooksreviews.com/theory/the-jazz-theory-book/


3

Your best bet is to make your own solo transcriptions. Get some software that slows down music without changing its pitch, and use it to transcribe your favorite Gary Burton solos. Like most things, when you do it yourself it's much harder and slower, but you also learn much more deeply and completely. If you simply want to play Gary Burton solos, then ...


3

As the others have noted, the general theories (namely harmony and rhythm) are the most important in the context of western music. But if you consider timbre and articulation as being a part of theory, then yes, there are theroetical aspects that are peculiar to certain instruments For instance, plucked strings have limited sustain -- and this can in fact ...


3

When I was growing up, my dad came up with a brilliant strategy for a stubborn binding: Bandsaw off the spine, then spiral-bind the whole book. VoilĂ ! Well-behaved Mussorgsky.


3

If you do not have access to a teacher, I recommend choosing a program that will provide you with corrective feedback so that you may fix your mistakes in order to progress. In my experience, lacking this feedback you may unknowingly develop poor habits, both musically and technically. Fixing your mistakes requires seeing and hearing correct playing. So, a ...


3

This should really be multiple questions, because it seems that you want to know multiple things, but i'll do my best. What's the difference between trying to master a particular exercise completely, and improving on it a little bit and coming back later. What are the benefits? Practicing different exercises that focus on the same technique serves to ...


2

In French, the most well-known theory book is the Danhauser's book. It is still old but it is very pedagogous. The linked version is the original one. You can purchase revised versions which are not in public domain. It should be available in music paper stores too, at least in France. Another interesting link is this one, still in French, oriented towards ...


2

A great longterm fix that I've found for this issue is to just take the score to a kinko's or other copy center and have them replace the binding with a spiral binding. This way, the book can stay open on any page and you don't have to worry about the binding breaking. The only thing to watch out for is to make sure you don't lose any of the music when you ...


2

The "Standard Method" for getting a book to stay open is to Place the spine firmly on a table. open both covers and fold flat (run your finger along the inside to help guide the fold on paperbacks) fold down each page in turn, alernating sides, until you get to the middle. This way should leave the spine intact, but able to lay flat.


2

For classic guitar I recommend: The Christopher Parkening Guitar Method, Vol. 1 The Christopher Parkening Guitar Method, Vol. 2 These were published in the early 1970s by the great virtuoso Christopher Parkening with Jack Marshall and David Brandon. They are highly regarded by guitar teachers. The newest edition comes with a CD so you can hear what ...


2

I know the book/guitar method which teaches exactly the way You want. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Mickey-Baker-s-Jazz-Guitar/3596589 It focus clearly on useful things (chords, scales, etc.) to be practical out-of the box. The pace is intended not to be fast. Author recommends one chapter a week routine. After a year You should be performing jazz ...


2

I havent looked at beginner books recently. But I can offer a rule of thumb: A Real Classical Guitar Book will contain no tablature. It is very important to "take the plunge" and master staff notation. The book I used and was very happy with was The Romero Method, by Celedonio Romero, but it looks like it's out of print. :( There is a book by Son of ...


2

Use Technology! Scan it and load it into a tablet like the new iPad 3! Place the tablet on the dip in your piano... and lo, u can just tap to turn!


2

There are a number of ways in which self-study differs from instruction from a teacher. You must "teach yourself" the material. So you must learn the new terms and concepts, and then switch gears and act as a drill sergeant until the technique has been fully incorporated. Some rules of thumb suggest themselves. Don't Skim. The word you skip may be the ...


2

AT most in the left hand, you'll play four tones simultaneously, but more often you're playing just two or three. Generally when you are harmonizing the melody, you will voice chords in both hands with the melody note on top. A standard way to do this in jazz is put the root and third or root and 7th in the left hand, and fill out two more of the chord ...


2

I kind of feel that all of these issues should be addressed in the text of the method. The author should describe what the point of the exercise is, the trick of it if there is one. And offer some guide to understanding how much of it you might need to accomplish other goals (songs). One of the great advantages of books focused on Classical technique is ...


2

As a classically-trained pianist who is now beginning to learn jazz piano, I would recommend taking classical piano lessons because with that comes classical music theory which is an important thing to understand, regardless of your chosen style. Once you are suitably adept with classical piano, you could then begin to learn the features and practices of ...



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