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I would start with taking the free Berklee Music course Gary Burton teaches on www.coursera.org - Introduction to Jazz Improvisation. Next session starts in 6 days. I also just realized this is a really old question, so hopefully the OP is still around and has progressed in his jazz playing skills :)


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A classical education ultimately prepares you for sight-reading and reproduction. But in the process, there is of course a lot of execution skills as well as getting exposed to a lot of different thoughts and media. There is no way to get exposed to music better than playing it. Should someone wanting to be a poet recite other people's poetry? How else ...


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In addition to also recommending the Adler, I'd also recommend Alfred Blatter's Instrumentation and Orchestration. Blatter teaches orchestration at the Curtis Institute, which if you know anything about the music world, is a pretty good school. It's a good book because it gives you dynamic curves (read: "responsiveness") for each instrument, which helps ...


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I've worked from the Rimsky-Korsakov before, but maybe you could also check out Samuel Adler's The Study of Orchestration. I don't think it's perfect by any means, but I haven't run across any better books in regards to contemporary performance and practice. It does cover instrumentation pretty heavily, but maybe take a look (you know, before buying it) and ...


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Norman Del Mar's *Anatomy of the Orchestra", perhaps. It was deliberately written to cover "things I haven't seen in other books".


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ABRSM Music Theory books are very well put together. I prefer the Josephine Koh books above all the others. When you do the music theory you will learn all the ways and manners in which musicians use to portray feelings and emotions. You can find out more here. ABRSM USA



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