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I honestly think that at an absolute beginner level, one of the best places to search for instruction is the internet. I always think that many people underestimate the power of the internet, and often look towards paid instruction, which a lot of the time looks more professional. Don't get me wrong, I don't think that books are a bad idea in any way. I'm ...


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Start with the "Dummies" book. It's basic, but you NEED the basics. Also obtain sample Music Theory test papers from the ABRSM, and the associated textbooks. When you're absolutely confident you could sail through the Grade 5 test (Grade 8 would be better) you'll know the language, and can think about some more "modern" approaches.


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Your use of the word 'meticulous' reminded me of my first theory teacher relating this stern instruction in best school marm fashion: You may break any of these hallowed rules of musical composition only after you are totally familiar with all of them, because by then you will know enough to strictly contain yourself until you thoroughly understand WHY these ...


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As you look for the very beginning basics, I would encourage you to pick up the simple Keys to Music Rudiments book which, when I began teaching, was the go to and I still use for absolute beginners, including adults. It does not presume you have any background to fall back on and there are six accompanying workbooks. When you are through these, which could ...


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I have been playing guitar for more than 10 years, and the only book I ever needed was this one, which I was recommended by many people on the Ultimate-Guitar.com forum. https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine/dp/1883217040/ You can read the first few chapters for free on the Amazon website. It's not just for playing jazz, but covers all the ...


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I cannot comment on the books you mention, as I have not used them, but I do have some recommendations that might be useful. There is a series of books (published by Schott) and written by Paul Hindemith which would seem to fit the bill. They are incredibly thorough and do start from the very beginnings. The first is Elementary Training for Musicians, ...


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No textbook is flawless. Even ignoring the occasional typo, every student is different and learns in a different way, so the best textbook for one student might be just "eh" for another. (And don't even get me started on cost...) I've worked extensively with both the Laitz and Clendinning/Marvin textbooks, and I can enthusiastically recommend both. They ...


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Well let's go step by step 1- I know today we have lots of information available on Internet, but do not make the same mistake as me in the beginning, when you choose a lots of book u can ready none so firstly. Take one book and start reading. It's cool get opinion for other people about books but sometimes they can be wrong or a book that is good for me may ...


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First ports of call ought to be the examination boards, ABRSM, Trinity, LCM and RSL spring to mind. Their syllabi contain most that you'll need to know and learn. ABRSM goes down the rather classical route, while LCM takes a more modern approach, and maybe puts things in that are not relevant to your needs.You don't need to take the exams, but I recommend ...


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Answer 1 - Definitely not! You don't need struggle with those chords I tough disable people (with no middle finger, as example) and a solution for that particular chord was using a bar, it means press all strings with one finger it seems difficult but it's an alternative Answer 2 - It should be a bunch of it but I don't know sorry, but I will explain why I ...


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If you fretted the full barre version - E5,A7,D5,G5,B5,e5, then you could mute whatever you need, with a little practice. Or play the strings you want to with hybrid picking. In the barre version, there are 2 A, 2 E, a G and a C. If playing alone, an A,C and G are sufficient - in jazz the 3rd shows maj/min., while the 7th shows, well, the 7th! In an ensemble ...


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I learned to fret this quite effectively from Rick Peckham at Berklee Online in the Chords 101 class. Use the ring finger to barre the top strings, then wrap the middle finger on top of that to fret the sixth string. The fifth string and first string will be naturally muted. This is a much quicker and convenient fretting method. To answer your first ...


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Both shapes you pictured are A - 7 chords. Also 6th string 5th fret, 5th string 3rd fret and 4th string 5th fret is form of A - 7. If you play the top four strings, 1,2,3,4 together leaving out the 6th string bass that is also a form of A - 7. Sometimes you don’t have to or want to play the full array of chords, just enough for the listener to get the ...



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