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41

It actually has to do with the physics of sound production for the bowed string instruments. The sound is produced on the viol family of instruments by the string "slipping across" the bow. That is, the bow catches (by friction) the string, displaces it a certain distance, until the restorative force from the tension in the string overcomes the friction ...


28

Beside Willie Wong's nice answer, a double-bass player needs more pressure on the bow than a violin player. The longer the distance between your hand and the tip of the bow, the greater the force your wrist would need to apply. In other words, playing the double-bass with a bow as long as a violin's may require too much wrist strength for playing with the ...


8

A few years ago I asked this exact question to the archetier who made my bow. According to him, bow weight and flexibility are the things to have in mind when having a bow built. These are the things that make a difference in a bow. Now about it being round or octagonal, it was a purely aesthetic decision. The bow can be heavier or lighter, jumpy or ...


8

An up-bow doesn't have to start at the tip of the bow. It often does, but to get this bar, it can be taken off momentarily, then re-applied, still as an up-bow, for the last note, which will more often be an up, so the downbeat of the next bar can be a downbow.I wonder why the first slur looks printed, while the other two look hand written.


8

You stop the bow just like you would when changing direction and continue just like if you had changed direction: this is not supposed to sound differently from a normal note (and if you made some bowing mistake on the way here, you just resynchronize with the bowing instructions at this point). The phrases here are short enough that you won't need to reset ...


7

For a given instrument (violin, viola, cello, bass is more complicated), the tuning of a fractional size instrument (1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 are commonly seen, 7/8 used to be frequently called "lady's cello") is always the same as the full size instrument. viola is a bit complicated because professionals have different sizes (15', 16', sometimes 17' for ...


7

The screw plays several roles: The hair can (and should) be loosened when not playing so that the bow is not constantly subjected to hair tension. It's the same reason some people recommend loosening guitar strings when storing a guitar for a longer period of time, except a guitar neck has the advantage of a stiff metal rod inside it, which the violin bow ...


6

When you draw a bow across the strings, you are imparting energy into the combined physical system of the violin and the bow. What you want is for as much of that energy as possible to be transmitted to the strings, which transmit it to the bridge, which transmit it into the violin and then out to the air. Like anything else, a bow isn't 100% efficient; ...


5

Usually the three-quarter or other smaller than standard violins are for younger, smaller children. A full sized violin would be way too much for a three or four year old to handle. The bow is appropriately smaller, as well. The spoken lengths of the strings are obviously in proportion, and a child will have to re-adapt when it grows big enough for the next ...


5

3/4 means three quarters size as opposed to full size. The tuning can be the same, but the scale length is different, which means string length and tension (and thickness) are different. So while you use the same techniques, the finger positioning will vary. The reason for these different size instruments is the difference in tonal quality. The resonant ...


5

I would like to point out 2 very inspiring people to me. First is Adrian Anantawan: Second is Casey Driessen: The first case is the one of a least said fantastic violinist that does not have one hand. The second case is a of a bluegrass legend (despite still being quite young) that holds ...


5

The term martelé refers to "hammered", meaning this that the section is to be played aggressively spiccato. The term détaché refers to "separated", as in clear and articulated notes, not necessarily marked in any way.


5

Détaché - Simply meaning detached, it implies that each note is played in a separate bow stroke (as oppose to Legato where groups of notes should be smoothly played in the same stroke of the bow.) The bowing should still be smooth without emphasis on the separation - this emphasis would imply a Détaché-lancé bow stroke. Martelé - Hammered. Simply speaking, ...


5

The reports I've heard are: The grooves in the base of the e-bow do not align with bass strings, thus it is more difficult (though not impossible) to get a steady, consistent placement of the bow at the right location over the string. Due to their thickness, it is more difficult for the ebow to activate the strings; thus you are more likely to need to ...


5

Yes, you can use a bass bow. Not sure why Tim above said that a cello bow is longer than a violin one - it's the other way round, which is why a cello bow is better than a violin bow for saw playing. Not sure why the person in the 1st answer thinks long notes would be difficult with a shorter bow - most sawists don't bow continuously like violinists - you ...


4

This is how I do it, product of inputs from my colleagues, teachers and my own experiences: pre-note: if the bow hair does not hold the roisin, you have either very old bow hair, or have dirty bow hair. There are products to clean it, some say plain water is the best. I use hand soap (the solid one, less chemicals the best). #1 - put tension in the bow ...


4

Standard appears to be a violin bow, but a longer cello or string bass bow would do. Personally, I'd keep my bass bow for that instrument, and have a dedicated saw bow. Not sure how much wear and tear on the hair it produces, but having a second bow to your string has always been thought of as something good...


4

I've done the following on many bows. Never damaged any bow. Water mixed with some detergent, in a mug or bowl. Unscrew and remove the nut. bring the nut near tip. Ask someone to hold the bow stick in one hand and the nut in other hand, so the bow hair hangs like a U. Tricky part: Dip parts of bow hair in the soap-water. Rub the wet bow hair along its ...


4

It's definitely not the water that damaged the bow hairs. If it was the water, it probably just wasn't thorough enough, and ended up just making the hair sticky instead. You can wash it in soap water, or better yet, horse hair shampoo. Bow hair is horse hair, after all. Just be sure to wash off the soap/shampoo really really well, or the rosin won't stick. ...


4

Essentially, the hair is held in place at both ends of the bow by wooden wedges. To change the hair, you need to gently remove the old wedges and cut new ones, then push the hair back into place under the new wedge. No glue is used at all. The length of the hair doesn't need to be super accurate because the bow is obviously adjusted with the tightening ...


4

As is often the case with questions about bow direction, it helps to think about the musical phrasing - how would you sing this? That F# at the end is an anacrusis, a pickup note that forms part of the next phrase. It makes sense that there should be a slight pause (a "breath") between the end of one phrase and the beginning of the next. To get that ...


4

Bow tension The most important thing you could do for your bow is to keep it loosened when it is not in use. This is something that every string player must do when putting their bow back in the case after playing. Storage Placement-wise, it is best to leave the bow in the case and occasionally take it out into the sun. If you have a long plastic bag ...


4

The “Finger Bow” allows the player to instantly switch between finger style (pizzicato), and bowing (arco) with a flick of a finger. The bow is 10 3/8” long, and made of lightweight and resonate poplar wood. It is not intended to replace a traditional longer bow but to be a new tool for creative expression. -Finger Bow website Just an easier way to ...


3

'Martele' could be described as a long staccato. Staccato is a short stroke executed with very short bow length, biting the string at the beginning of the note, releasing the pressure and moving energetic but very short and biting again for the next note. Martele is executed in a similar way, only the energetic movement involves much longer bow and more ...


3

According to this guy, this type of fast Spiccato should actually be called Sautille: He gives a good demonstration of how to go about it in that video. Perhaps you should also watch another one of his videos which is related to this:


3

I did some research on this and found some very strong indicators that the string is indeed pressed against the fingerboard. The most convincing point is offered in this book on composing for japanese instruments. The chapter on the Kokyu starts at p.112 and likens many techniqual aspects of playing to the Shamisen, where the strings do indeed touch the ...


3

They shouldn't sound any different. They're gripped differently, which causes there to be certain tendencies, but the goal is for them to sound the same. Any skilled player should be able to play both and make them sound indistinguishable.


3

I had a bow that I stored in a cello case for months, with the tension off. When I went back to try to use it, I discovered that 2/3 of the horsehairs had been eaten through. My teacher then told me about "bow mites" (microscopic critters that are also called dust mites or carpet mites). She said that a bow needs to be stored with mothballs (napthaline or ...


3

I'm not a string player (I once tried to learn viola da gamba but gave it up), however I've known a lot of early music string players. I was once told by a professional Baroque violist that in order to perform all the styles of music from the earliest days of the violin, viola and cello to the present day, if one wants to observe historical performance ...


2

Supposing that every non-legato note is being played with a different bow, then, yes you'll have to pause for a tiny bit there. At first the pause might be slightly longer than needed, but with practice you'll be able to find the 'right amount' of pause. The reason the pause needs to be there is because if it isn't, these two notes will sound like legato ...



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