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37

It actually has to do with the physics of sound production for the bowed string instruments. The sound is produced on the viol family of instruments by the string "slipping across" the bow. That is, the bow catches (by friction) the string, displaces it a certain distance, until the restorative force from the tension in the string overcomes the friction ...


28

Beside Willie Wong's nice answer, a double-bass player needs more pressure on the bow than a violin player. The longer the distance between your hand and the tip of the bow, the greater the force your wrist would need to apply. In other words, playing the double-bass with a bow as long as a violin's may require too much wrist strength for playing with the ...


7

A few years ago I asked this exact question to the archetier who made my bow. According to him, bow weight and flexibility are the things to have in mind when having a bow built. These are the things that make a difference in a bow. Now about it being round or octagonal, it was a purely aesthetic decision. The bow can be heavier or lighter, jumpy or ...


6

When you draw a bow across the strings, you are imparting energy into the combined physical system of the violin and the bow. What you want is for as much of that energy as possible to be transmitted to the strings, which transmit it to the bridge, which transmit it into the violin and then out to the air. Like anything else, a bow isn't 100% efficient; ...


6

The screw plays several roles: The hair can (and should) be loosened when not playing so that the bow is not constantly subjected to hair tension. It's the same reason some people recommend loosening guitar strings when storing a guitar for a longer period of time, except a guitar neck has the advantage of a stiff metal rod inside it, which the violin bow ...


5

I would like to point out 2 very inspiring people to me. First is Adrian Anantawan: Second is Casey Driessen: ...


5

I am not positive about this, but I think cutting the bow as an octagonal might make the bow a little bit stiffer. So bow makers might do it if they feel that particular cut of wood could benefit from a little more stiffness. However, as I said, I am not sure about this. As far as which to select, I think there is no reason to chose one or the other. The ...


4

I've done the following on many bows. Never damaged any bow. Water mixed with some detergent, in a mug or bowl. Unscrew and remove the nut. bring the nut near tip. Ask someone to hold the bow stick in one hand and the nut in other hand, so the bow hair hangs like a U. Tricky part: Dip parts of bow hair in the soap-water. Rub the wet bow hair along its ...


4

It's definitely not the water that damaged the bow hairs. If it was the water, it probably just wasn't thorough enough, and ended up just making the hair sticky instead. You can wash it in soap water, or better yet, horse hair shampoo. Bow hair is horse hair, after all. Just be sure to wash off the soap/shampoo really really well, or the rosin won't stick. ...


4

Essentially, the hair is held in place at both ends of the bow by wooden wedges. To change the hair, you need to gently remove the old wedges and cut new ones, then push the hair back into place under the new wedge. No glue is used at all. The length of the hair doesn't need to be super accurate because the bow is obviously adjusted with the tightening ...


2

Détaché - Simply meaning detached, it implies that each note is played in a separate bow stroke (as oppose to Legato where groups of notes should be smoothly played in the same stroke of the bow.) The bowing should still be smooth without emphasis on the separation - this emphasis would imply a Détaché-lancé bow stroke. Martelé - Hammered. Simply speaking, ...


2

'Martele' could be described as a long staccato. Staccato is a short stroke executed with very short bow length, biting the string at the beginning of the note, releasing the pressure and moving energetic but very short and biting again for the next note. Martele is executed in a similar way, only the energetic movement involves much longer bow and more ...


2

According to this guy, this type of fast Spiccato should actually be called Sautille: He gives a good demonstration of how to go about it in that video. Perhaps you should also watch ...


1

It can certainly be adjusted for different playing styles and conditions as mentioned already, and this is definitely something to bear in mind. However, the primary reason is really to preserve the condition of the bow when not in use, and is why you should always loosen your bow off when you're not using it. Constantly subjecting the wooden rod of the bow ...



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