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8

An up-bow doesn't have to start at the tip of the bow. It often does, but to get this bar, it can be taken off momentarily, then re-applied, still as an up-bow, for the last note, which will more often be an up, so the downbeat of the next bar can be a downbow.I wonder why the first slur looks printed, while the other two look hand written.


8

You stop the bow just like you would when changing direction and continue just like if you had changed direction: this is not supposed to sound differently from a normal note (and if you made some bowing mistake on the way here, you just resynchronize with the bowing instructions at this point). The phrases here are short enough that you won't need to reset ...


4

As is often the case with questions about bow direction, it helps to think about the musical phrasing - how would you sing this? That F# at the end is an anacrusis, a pickup note that forms part of the next phrase. It makes sense that there should be a slight pause (a "breath") between the end of one phrase and the beginning of the next. To get that ...


4

The “Finger Bow” allows the player to instantly switch between finger style (pizzicato), and bowing (arco) with a flick of a finger. The bow is 10 3/8” long, and made of lightweight and resonate poplar wood. It is not intended to replace a traditional longer bow but to be a new tool for creative expression. -Finger Bow website Just an easier way to ...


4

Bow tension The most important thing you could do for your bow is to keep it loosened when it is not in use. This is something that every string player must do when putting their bow back in the case after playing. Storage Placement-wise, it is best to leave the bow in the case and occasionally take it out into the sun. If you have a long plastic bag ...


3

I had a bow that I stored in a cello case for months, with the tension off. When I went back to try to use it, I discovered that 2/3 of the horsehairs had been eaten through. My teacher then told me about "bow mites" (microscopic critters that are also called dust mites or carpet mites). She said that a bow needs to be stored with mothballs (napthaline or ...


3

I did some research on this and found some very strong indicators that the string is indeed pressed against the fingerboard. The most convincing point is offered in this book on composing for japanese instruments. The chapter on the Kokyu starts at p.112 and likens many techniqual aspects of playing to the Shamisen, where the strings do indeed touch the ...


3

They shouldn't sound any different. They're gripped differently, which causes there to be certain tendencies, but the goal is for them to sound the same. Any skilled player should be able to play both and make them sound indistinguishable.


3

I'm not a string player (I once tried to learn viola da gamba but gave it up), however I've known a lot of early music string players. I was once told by a professional Baroque violist that in order to perform all the styles of music from the earliest days of the violin, viola and cello to the present day, if one wants to observe historical performance ...


2

The name for the sounds you are describing are indeed called Subharmonics. They were discovered by violinist Mari Kimura in the early 1990's and first presented in 1994. As her website states, I first discovered the technique from an age-old bowing exercise, a modified version of "Son Filé", drawing the bow very slowly but applying slightly more ...


2

In short: Bows varied a lot during the baroque period, and evolved into something pretty similar to a modern bow. The bow in the first picture may be heavier, shorter, and with a less pronounced curve than a typical modern bow, and would be made of a different, less dense type of wood. But the picture doesn't show enough to tell all the detail of this ...


2

Supposing that every non-legato note is being played with a different bow, then, yes you'll have to pause for a tiny bit there. At first the pause might be slightly longer than needed, but with practice you'll be able to find the 'right amount' of pause. The reason the pause needs to be there is because if it isn't, these two notes will sound like legato ...


2

Honestly, I don't think it makes much of a difference by itself. On cello, the standard way to mellow down the sound is to angle the bow towards yourself – but that has the opposite effect as on violin / viola, namely that only the hairs farthest away from the bridge touch the string. The important points seem to be Few hairs on the string, no ...


1

Source: I work in a music store and this is how we clean our instruments. Getting Rosin Off The most effective way to take rosin off of strings is to soak a cheese cloth in a little bit of nail polish remover. Afterwards, take the cloth and rub it against the string. The rosin should come off momentarily. Get a new cheese cloth when you see that the used ...


1

If you've got a lot of build-up, you can use an old wine bottle cork or a (not too scratchy) scouring pad to try to dislodge some of the caked-up residue. If that doesn't work, use some denatured alcohol, but carefully - don't let it drip on the varnished surfaces of the instrument. Once it's gone, remember to give the strings a firm wipe with a soft cloth ...



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