Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

I would like to point out 2 very inspiring people to me. First is Adrian Anantawan: Second is Casey Driessen: ...


5

The reports I've heard are: The grooves in the base of the e-bow do not align with bass strings, thus it is more difficult (though not impossible) to get a steady, consistent placement of the bow at the right location over the string. Due to their thickness, it is more difficult for the ebow to activate the strings; thus you are more likely to need to ...


5

Yes, you can use a bass bow. Not sure why Tim above said that a cello bow is longer than a violin one - it's the other way round, which is why a cello bow is better than a violin bow for saw playing. Not sure why the person in the 1st answer thinks long notes would be difficult with a shorter bow - most sawists don't bow continuously like violinists - you ...


4

Standard appears to be a violin bow, but a longer cello or string bass bow would do. Personally, I'd keep my bass bow for that instrument, and have a dedicated saw bow. Not sure how much wear and tear on the hair it produces, but having a second bow to your string has always been thought of as something good...


1

Short answer is yes. I've heard the saw played with bows of all sizes, and in one concert, with a wooden dowel (just add rosin). In my experience, a saw takes more physical pressure than a violin if you want a good tone. The shorter length of the bass and cello bows is an advantage for this, because the further you get from where you are gripping the bow, ...


1

The martelé and détaché bowing techniques are almost identical. Both originated in the military as close variations of a style of regimental playing. The word martelé is from the Latin root for military. In Napoleon's army the revolutionary ideal affected music and the concept of 'regiment' was considered too aristratic. Even the names of months and the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible