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5

The reports I've heard are: The grooves in the base of the e-bow do not align with bass strings, thus it is more difficult (though not impossible) to get a steady, consistent placement of the bow at the right location over the string. Due to their thickness, it is more difficult for the ebow to activate the strings; thus you are more likely to need to ...


5

Yes, you can use a bass bow. Not sure why Tim above said that a cello bow is longer than a violin one - it's the other way round, which is why a cello bow is better than a violin bow for saw playing. Not sure why the person in the 1st answer thinks long notes would be difficult with a shorter bow - most sawists don't bow continuously like violinists - you ...


5

I would like to point out 2 very inspiring people to me. First is Adrian Anantawan: Second is Casey Driessen: ...


4

I did some research on this and found some very strong indicators that the string is indeed pressed against the fingerboard. The most convincing point is offered in this book on composing for japanese instruments. The chapter on the Kokyu starts at p.112 and likens many techniqual aspects of playing to the Shamisen, where the strings do indeed touch the ...


4

Standard appears to be a violin bow, but a longer cello or string bass bow would do. Personally, I'd keep my bass bow for that instrument, and have a dedicated saw bow. Not sure how much wear and tear on the hair it produces, but having a second bow to your string has always been thought of as something good...


2

Short answer is yes. I've heard the saw played with bows of all sizes, and in one concert, with a wooden dowel (just add rosin). In my experience, a saw takes more physical pressure than a violin if you want a good tone. The shorter length of the bass and cello bows is an advantage for this, because the further you get from where you are gripping the bow, ...


2

They shouldn't sound any different. They're gripped differently, which causes there to be certain tendencies, but the goal is for them to sound the same. Any skilled player should be able to play both and make them sound indistinguishable.


2

This is how I do it, product of inputs from my colleagues, teachers and my own experiences: pre-note: if the bow hair does not hold the roisin, you have either very old bow hair, or have dirty bow hair. There are products to clean it, some say plain water is the best. I use hand soap (the solid one, less chemicals the best). #1 - put tension in the bow ...


2

For an actually newly haired bow (unlikely in your case), it may help "sanding" the rosin a bit with a knife. Actual sandpaper might get a bit messy but is also possible. At any rate: you'll not be doing yourself a favor by using old rosin: after a few years it dries out and gets more dusty than sticky in its qualities, leading to a scratchy tone quality. ...


1

I had the same question for my bow on my double bass. I guess the simplest answer is to try it out. Put a little rosin on your bow and play. If the bow hair does not 'stick' on the strings, it needs more; otherwise it is good to play. Put some more rosin and repeat step (1). Just be careful not to put too much rosin on the bow. If you put too much, ...



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