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13

Yes. They might be brash and full of bravado, but they will see the long term effects when they age. They will not be able to play for as long during their lifetime as they would if they were healthy. Quite simply: Wind instruments need wind. Smoking inhibits your ability to create wind. Therefore, reduced wind production reduces tone production, ...


11

In the British Brass Band Tradition, the Baritone is a member of the Saxhorn family, whereas the Euphonium is a member of the Tuba family. The Euphonium has a wider bore and a more conical flare over more of the instrument's length, compared to the smaller, shorter Baritone flare. Generally, most Reasonable Euphoniums in the UK will have 4 Valves, arranged ...


10

Looks like a Sousaphone to me. :)


10

As the horn section you met has demonstrated - smoking and brass playing are not completely incompatible. People can play brass, and play well, despite smoking, at least for a period. Smoking definitely damages your ability to breathe; it reduces lung capacity; it stiffens lung tissue; it narrows breathing passages; it causes excess mucus; it reduces blood ...


9

Think of a bugle in C. Bugles have no valves, and the notes you can produce on them are only the following: C - G - C - E - G - Bb - C - D - E - ... These match the overtone series of C. On the trumpet, however, you have valves, which enable you to play additional notes. Press the second valve and the length of tubing increases in the amount needed to ...


7

One of the best bits of advice I've had about writing good, comfortable sounding trumpet parts is "keep it on the stave". Sure, the trumpet range extends beyond this, both above and below the stave, but the range on the stave is comfortable and will generally blend well with other instruments. Back when I started composing and arranging (a pretty long time ...


6

The best definitions in my opinion (and after some considerable research) are: A trumpet has a mouthpiece and bell that are located at opposite ends of the instrument. A trombone is defined by a bell section that is located to the rear of the instrument, with a mouthpiece located near the center of gravity and grip location. Thus, the trumpet will be ...


6

I think half-valve is the only technique that would be effective. Try to find a valve position that gives you the flexibility. It can involve any number of valves in any position (whatever if they are involved in the start or the end tone). Once you find a position where you can have a rather large range, use that for your drops and falls. In these ...


6

That is a Sousaphone, but this one is made mostly of fiberglass plastic (except for the small brass pipes and valves.) Other Sousaphones are made with brass parts (sometimes silver plated.) It is not "Home-Made" - Sousaphones are manufactured by several music instrument companies in the US, Europe and Asia. Sousaphones are usually pitched in BBb (old ones ...


6

The simple answer from a historical perspective is that valves on brass instruments were an addition to simple coiled horns like the bugle and hunting horn. It's kind of counterintuitive to add something in order to take away something; why not add something that adds something? Add the valve, and add its pipe; with the valve not depressed, the instrument is ...


6

1.The best way is to take it to a repair shop! They might even fix it for free. 2.Otherwise there is a specific tool for separating mothpieces from trumpets that you could get (for instance the Bobcat Mouthpiece Puller which you find at for instance Amazon), but the first option is probably easier and cheaper if available to you. Trying to fix it yourself ...


6

Considering that it's the same mouthpiece you used in elementary school, mouthpieces models for beginning instrumentalists are sometimes selected on the smaller side (smaller mouth + smaller mouthpiece = better chance of success!) There are several reasons why you should invest in a larger mouthpiece, and below are a few: Horn mouthpieces are cheap - not ...


5

As Matthew indicated in his comment, once the wavelength of the sound gets smaller than the diameter of the tubing, the trumpet will no longer behave like a column of air. This means that, at these wavelengths, the trumpet will not support the resonance modes that make up its behaviour at normal frequencies. I.e. not sound like a trumpet (to the extent ...


5

Your first assumption is (mostly) right. Trumpet physics are actually fairly complicated: The basic tube has an open and closed end which by itself would only produce odd numbered harmonics with a quarter wavelength fundamental. However the tapered mouthpiece tapered bell change the harmonics spacing so it gets much closer to the natural harmonic ...


5

There are two things on the tuba that make it hard to play fast runs -- the valves and the pitch. The valves are big and have a lot of travel, and they have fairly strong springs. Moving them fast and accurately requires training your muscles as well as your brains. This requires practice. The low pitch of a tuba means there's a bigger time lag between when ...


5

Baritone Smaller Bore Cylindrical Tubing size stays same until it reaches the bell 3 valves Usually only found in brass bands Cutting and "solo" sound Euphonium Common to find bass clef parts Conical Tubing progressively gets wider as it approaches the bell 4 valves Deeper cut mouthpiece Darker sound Traditional concert instrument ...


5

Cody's summary of the differences between what you will generally find in an instrument called a "Euphonium" vs. one called a "baritone" is mostly spot on for today, but traditionally there really wasn't a difference between the two and it is a recent phenomenon where the high-end instruments are called euphoniums while cheaper student instruments are called ...


5

It's a baroque trumpet, basically a historical version of a trumpet without valves. Probably they hold it like that because that was the way it was held at that time (think of musicians on a tower, announcing the arrival of the king or stuff like that...)


5

The answer here is that you have a misconception about the "value" of each valve. The science of making a length of tube with three independent binary variances ("valves") fully chromatic across multiple octaves is an exercise in compromise. Each individual valve is slightly out of tune from what it "says on the label", such that the various combinations it ...


4

From an equipment standpoint alone this is a better technique, and is encouraged whenever smaller piston instruments are taught as well. Curving the fingers on top of the finger buttons ensures that the force on the valve is going to be straight up and down instead of to the side. On student instruments, this is especially important since seldom-oiled valves ...


4

I suppose with a cornet you'll have the ability to add something extra in for texture, so something like finding the main melody line in the song, whether it be with guitar or vocals have the trumpet follow this line to emphasise the line and it could offer a massive difference to the sound and feel of the song depending, you should try looking at reel big ...


4

It's very different! The mouthpiece is smaller than a trumpet's, yet the instrument's range covers that of a trombone. And, while you can get away with playing flugelhorn like a trumpet, if you play the horn like a trumpet not many people are going to want to listen to you. My advice would be to essentially relearn the horn fingerings from scratch instead ...


4

While not disagreeing with tubadaz's great answer, historians often quibble about the origins of various brass horns, and these horns have no shortage of ambiguity over their history. It's no secret that the terms are commonly mixed; a Google Image search for "Baritone Horn" yields a large number of instruments more correctly called euphoniums. The modern ...


4

I'm a professional tubist, and I also play trumpet as well - among other noise makers. I can tell you first-hand that playing trumpet or other instruments will generally not affect your ability to play tuba. It is good you are staying within the brass family as it is the least discouraging. When moving through brass instruments of different sizes, it is ...


4

If the player has a good ear (and you're not asking them to do really virtuosic playing), then the "embouchure shock" should be fairly minimal. As long as they're still reading transposed treble clef music, the fingerings will be exactly the same, with the notable exception of french horn (or is that a brass band instrument to start with?). Tuba doesn't ...


3

Unfortunately the design of most piston-valve flugelhorns encourages that kind of playing technique, but it really should be avoided if possible. Actuating the valves with the middle of your fingers actually makes you work a lot harder since the movement of the tip of your finger is amplified as though it were a lever over a fulcrum. You should try to keep ...


3

The act of tonguing gives a slight burst of additional air pressure, just what is needed to skip to the next note in the harmonic series. (You may not notice as much of a benefit in descending for this reason). In addition, that separation between the notes (using the tongue) makes it sound much cleaner. You eliminate the "in-between" of the slur. (So it's ...


3

The first answer above by NReilingh covers the physical appearance of the instruments but there is also an acoustic difference. A Slide trumpet has a large bore of .460-.470" and is played using a trumpet mouthpiece. It also has a long tapered lead-pipe inside the upper tube just like any other trumpet. A Soprano trombone has a more trombone like smaller ...


3

You can normally use silver solder on brass instruments. It may take a propane torch instead of a soldering iron. A lot of instruments are silver-plated brass. Check for and seal leaks in the joints and around the valves and spit valves. They can cause resonance problems that make it hard to hit certain notes.


3

(I know this post is 2 years old but I'm a Tuba player who has had this problem before so...) I use "Soundcorset Metronome & Tuner" for my phone, but I always find that, no matter what app I use, digital tuners for low instruments like Tubas are too jumpy for me. Even some stand alone tuners do it as well. What I found that works really well is to get ...



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