New answers tagged

0

In enthusiastic agreement with Hilmar's explanation of excitation and resonance for an open-valved trumpet, here are additional details and a chart about relationships between resonant frequencies, timbral components and pitch. This follows the question's example of an open-valved middle G played on a trumpet. Corresponding notes for other brasses are listed ...


0

Here's the test - ask a bunch of brass players to first sight-read a passage with n sharps in the key signature and then a different passage of similar difficulty with n flats in the key signature. Count the number of errors for each performance and collate the results. My expectation (contrary to the received wisdom quoted in the OP) is that the accuracy ...


5

Adding to the narrative in other answers, here is a chart that might help further explain why brass players tend to prefer sheet music written in keys with flats. As is shown, written keys that exclude the “worst-to-play usual notes” (elaborated below) on common brass instruments (except French horn) are overwhelmingly keys with flats. This is ...


0

To add to alephzero's notes on the clarinet, I'm pretty sure Adolphe Sax designed his set of instruments so a musician could easily switch from clarinet to sax and back. As it happens, there is a "C-melody sax" in rare use as well. Now to the question of key signature: The resonances and timbres of keyed instruments depend on the bore and the bottom note ...


1

The clarinet is different from almost every other wind instrument because it overblows at the twelfth, not at the octave. Therefore, the notes to cover the "break" between the lowest octave and a fifth are technically more difficult, especially on early clarinets with a limited number of finger-keys. The orchestral use of B flat and A clarinets dates from ...


2

This really depends upon how proficient you want to be at the clarinet and saxophone or trumpet. The problem is tonal consistency. If you play clarinet and saxophone well you can mess up your tone by switching back and forth. Mainly because you are training muscle groups to act together. This would be one of those examples of the "Jack of all trades" ...


1

From the description it sounds as if it is a fluid cup on the bottom of the valves. It would be there to prevent oil and saliva that would normally come out the bottom of the valves from dropping onto the floor. Purpose is for sanitary reasons.



Top 50 recent answers are included