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37

The angle is there to improve the intonation. If you've ever set the intonation on an electric guitar with individually-adjustable saddles, you'd see that the bass strings are slightly longer than the treble strings. This is due to the gauge of the strings: heavier strings need to be slightly longer than lighter-gauge strings. The B-string anomaly that ...


8

Many saddles are made of either two things; bone or hard formed plastic. You can get a nice and perfectly decent sound from a plastic one, but a bone saddle provides a tone and sound that is just that little bit nicer. Bone saddles are just that little bit more expensive though. Saddles also come in two different variants: straight and compensated. ...


7

"Floyd Rose Licensed" basically just means that the manufacturer has paid a licensing fee to the Floyd Rose company so as to not infringe upon Floyd Rose's patents. The trem could be made of stale chewing gum; as long as it is based upon the Floyd Rose design, it must be licensed. So, chances are, if you bought a dirt-cheap trem on eBay, it's going to ...


6

It shouldn't damage anything. However, it will make the strings slightly closer together and it may cause additional wear at the point the string goes over the saddle, since you are now causing a slight sideways angle. If you go through a few sets of strings and aren't breaking an unreasonable amount of strings because of it, you should be fine. A tiny ...


6

Generally, with a guitar in good condition, no. The only time I've detuned a guitar was when shipping one via air, where it might be in an unpressurized baggage compartment. I think the strings should be kept at pitch - but you should check and adjust them if they are getting sharp (which can happen with temperature and humidity changes.) If you play a ...


5

Between bone and plastic saddles I much prefer bone saddles, both because of their hardness and its ability to transfer the vibrations. Plastic ones have to be treated very carefully when sanding the bottom to get the right height. Especially on a belt or disc sander, the material can warm up, causing it to soften and expand, resulting in a concave bottom ...


4

The bridge is the key point of connection between the strings and the body, but the tailpiece is an essential part of this. The main effect of upgrading this will be to change sustain and tone. You may also notice an improvement in tuning stability - if you are upgrading from a poor quality bridge/tailpiece. The actual effect varies a lot between an ...


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the ...


4

This should be repairable. Luckily the tension from ukulele strings is not that high, otherwise it would probably have snapped off altogether by now. You'll need a strong glue. I can't tell from your pictures whether it is the wood that has snapped, or the join between two pieces. If both halves are wood, a wood floor should be used, otherwise an epoxy, ...


4

Its sounds like to me that you are trying to treat a dive only bridge like its floating by raising it abit... This will cause tuning problems as it wasn't designed for use like that, and the string tension will be wrong. You could continue like this and try but really its just not meant for that kind of tremolo action.


2

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't recommend this at all! Get it professionally done, as you have stated you could ruin the bridge that could create noise. I had a bass that was perfectly normal (2nd hand bass) but had the bridge filed down for lower action. Unfortunately it created a buzzing that drove me to just getting a new bass.


2

No. You shouldn't have to do that on a guitar that's made well. The fact that the bridge is coming up is indicative of an issue with the guitar itself and not the tuning / strings. You should try and get the bridge fixed, in general. However, a quick google of GB&A guitars shows that they are very cheap acoustic guitars (~$70). I would not expect these ...


2

There are a couple of options... If you wanted to really do it proper, I'd recommend removing the bridge entirely and either getting a new one or removing as much of the old glue as possible and re-gluing it. If the instrument doesn't have great value to you and you just want it in good working order again in a way that should last, I'd just re-glue and ...


2

I called up the manufacturer when the bridge came clean off my Flea (after a period of tilting up, like you describe). The woman I spoke with advised me to just glue the bridge back on with Superglue. It's stayed put for the several years since I glued it. I don't see a phone number listed on https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/ any more, but there are a ...


2

No, in fact it's a fairly common adjustment to make for bridges that do not individual saddle height adjustments.


2

I doubt if you've turned the bridge by even one degree, so it won't hurt anything. On some guitars, the individual saddle can be unthreaded and turned through 180 degrees, to give more adjustment back or forth for intonating.Particularly those with triangular shaped saddles.Is it not possible to move the whole bridge assembly forward so that it is parallel ...


2

I have never seen anything like that, very cool. As for the material, I wouldn't use wood, use something harder and with a lower coefficient of friction eg nut or saddle materials such as corian, bone, brass, or some fret wire etc. I recommend black TUSQ XL http://www.graphtech.com/products/product-categories/acoustic-saddles As you need to tune both ...


1

That sort of pinging noise usually happens because strings are getting caught on the nut, so the first thing I’d try is lubricating the nut with graphite like you’ve already done for the bridge. If that doesn’t help, there’s another popular trick to keep your strings smooth at the bridge, which can also keep strings from breaking prematurely. Find some ...


1

It's going to depend on the gauge of strings you're using. The heavier gauges will benefit from more / tighter springs (I'm talking about Strat. type whammies here, but think the same process occurs). Even with light gauge strings, a tighter set up will give less movement on the bridge. Even when you've learned to bend properly - take a 'pre-bend as an ...


1

The above answer is correct. That is to say, sorry, but he is completely wrong and he doesnt know anything about Floyd Rose trems. (Maybe next time, offer facts and experience and not opinion...) Regarding the Original Question: There are many design parameters that have to be considered when making the swap from any Liscenced floyd to an Original or FR ...


1

The Gotoh Floyd Rose replacement bridge and an Original Floyd Rose bridge (As stated by VarLogRant) should be a drop in replacement in most cases. I have a few acquaintances that replaced the Jackson bridges because they wouldn't stay in tune... Check here for exact info, but it has been reported that some of the Gotoh OFR replacements have a trem block ...


1

I could be wrong here -- I'm a hardtail guy and don't know too much about Floyd Rose tremolos -- but it seems that it should be just a licensed Floyd Rose bridge, and another lefty Floyd Rose should be a drop-in replacement.


1

I had the same problem. I have a 2011 Fender American Deluxe Jazz V. I went to change the stock strings for a set of flat wounds. The B string is a 0.132, which is a big fat string. I can string through the body or through the bridge. Either way the wrapped end with the ball would not fit through either way leaving about an inch to go to get the ball at the ...



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