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38

The angle is there to improve the intonation. If you've ever set the intonation on an electric guitar with individually-adjustable saddles, you'd see that the bass strings are slightly longer than the treble strings. This is due to the gauge of the strings: heavier strings need to be slightly longer than lighter-gauge strings. The B-string anomaly that ...


8

Many saddles are made of either two things; bone or hard formed plastic. You can get a nice and perfectly decent sound from a plastic one, but a bone saddle provides a tone and sound that is just that little bit nicer. Bone saddles are just that little bit more expensive though. Saddles also come in two different variants: straight and compensated. ...


7

"Floyd Rose Licensed" basically just means that the manufacturer has paid a licensing fee to the Floyd Rose company so as to not infringe upon Floyd Rose's patents. The trem could be made of stale chewing gum; as long as it is based upon the Floyd Rose design, it must be licensed. So, chances are, if you bought a dirt-cheap trem on eBay, it's going to ...


6

It shouldn't damage anything. However, it will make the strings slightly closer together and it may cause additional wear at the point the string goes over the saddle, since you are now causing a slight sideways angle. If you go through a few sets of strings and aren't breaking an unreasonable amount of strings because of it, you should be fine. A tiny ...


6

Generally, with a guitar in good condition, no. The only time I've detuned a guitar was when shipping one via air, where it might be in an unpressurized baggage compartment. I think the strings should be kept at pitch - but you should check and adjust them if they are getting sharp (which can happen with temperature and humidity changes.) If you play a ...


6

The difference is that the nylon strings on the classical are all close to the same diameter, whereas on the steel string the diameter of the smallest string might be about 20% of the size of the diameter of the largest. This matters because the physics you have learned is simplified. Only string that have no thickness and no stiffness exactly fit the ...


5

A possible cause, apart from a faulty gluing of the bridge, is that you were an octave too high. Seen it happen too often, using a tuner that tells you the target note, but for some reason, you've gone to an octave above. Thus 4x the tension. Also seen it happen after it's been left in a place too hot - rad., sun, conservatory, etc. Or, you may have the ...


5

Unless you were tuning the strings well above the normal pitches for standard tuning (which you say you were not trying to do), this was caused by a defect with the guitar. Tuning a guitar up to standard pitch should not cause the bridge to come off. The defect may have been caused by previous attempts to tune the guitar strings too high, which causes ...


5

Between bone and plastic saddles I much prefer bone saddles, both because of their hardness and its ability to transfer the vibrations. Plastic ones have to be treated very carefully when sanding the bottom to get the right height. Especially on a belt or disc sander, the material can warm up, causing it to soften and expand, resulting in a concave bottom ...


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the ...


4

This should be repairable. Luckily the tension from ukulele strings is not that high, otherwise it would probably have snapped off altogether by now. You'll need a strong glue. I can't tell from your pictures whether it is the wood that has snapped, or the join between two pieces. If both halves are wood, a wood floor should be used, otherwise an epoxy, ...


4

Its sounds like to me that you are trying to treat a dive only bridge like its floating by raising it abit... This will cause tuning problems as it wasn't designed for use like that, and the string tension will be wrong. You could continue like this and try but really its just not meant for that kind of tremolo action.


4

I'm not sure if it's a manufacturing defect as much as a design flaw. This should not even be possible for a steel string acoustic. The ball ends should be held down by the bridge plate underneath the top, not the bridge itself. See this image: Where did you go wrong? I'm sorry to say it looks like you'll want to save up a little more for your next guitar ...


4

The bridge is the key point of connection between the strings and the body, but the tailpiece is an essential part of this. The main effect of upgrading this will be to change sustain and tone. You may also notice an improvement in tuning stability - if you are upgrading from a poor quality bridge/tailpiece. The actual effect varies a lot between an ...


4

You are incorrect in your assertion that there is a physical law being broken here. A guitar has six strings of different diameters, different materials (some strings are a plain length of steel wire, whereas others have other wires wrapped around the steel wire core) and tensile strengths, tuned to different pitches. As a result, there must be a compromise ...


3

Perhaps I have missed this in the other replies but one obvious thing to check would be the gauge of strings you were using. It's not clear from your question whether you were tuning your current set of strings or you had changed to a new set, but obviously if you were to tune to standard E with a set of strings that were too heavy for how your guitar is ...


3

That is relatively rate for a Les Paul, as most have fixed bridges, but that is a Floyd Rose Licensed Tremolo. Edit (actually, on closer inspection, it is not a Floyd Rose but some other type) - a device to allow you to change the tension, and hence pitch, of all six strings at once. It is a logical development of the old Fender trem, and it can cope with a ...


2

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't recommend this at all! Get it professionally done, as you have stated you could ruin the bridge that could create noise. I had a bass that was perfectly normal (2nd hand bass) but had the bridge filed down for lower action. Unfortunately it created a buzzing that drove me to just getting a new bass.


2

No. You shouldn't have to do that on a guitar that's made well. The fact that the bridge is coming up is indicative of an issue with the guitar itself and not the tuning / strings. You should try and get the bridge fixed, in general. However, a quick google of GB&A guitars shows that they are very cheap acoustic guitars (~$70). I would not expect these ...


2

There are a couple of options... If you wanted to really do it proper, I'd recommend removing the bridge entirely and either getting a new one or removing as much of the old glue as possible and re-gluing it. If the instrument doesn't have great value to you and you just want it in good working order again in a way that should last, I'd just re-glue and ...


2

I called up the manufacturer when the bridge came clean off my Flea (after a period of tilting up, like you describe). The woman I spoke with advised me to just glue the bridge back on with Superglue. It's stayed put for the several years since I glued it. I don't see a phone number listed on https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/ any more, but there are a ...


2

No, in fact it's a fairly common adjustment to make for bridges that do not individual saddle height adjustments.


2

I doubt if you've turned the bridge by even one degree, so it won't hurt anything. On some guitars, the individual saddle can be unthreaded and turned through 180 degrees, to give more adjustment back or forth for intonating.Particularly those with triangular shaped saddles.Is it not possible to move the whole bridge assembly forward so that it is parallel ...


2

I have never seen anything like that, very cool. As for the material, I wouldn't use wood, use something harder and with a lower coefficient of friction eg nut or saddle materials such as corian, bone, brass, or some fret wire etc. I recommend black TUSQ XL http://www.graphtech.com/products/product-categories/acoustic-saddles As you need to tune both ...


2

I have owned many guitars in my life. This has happened to me once before. You did nothing wrong. The glue joint in your bridge failed. This is a manufacturing defect. If your guitar is under warranty, appeal to the manufacturer and get warranty service. See if they will pay for repairs, or replace the guitar with another one. Otherwise you are going to ...


2

(WARNING: only do this if a guitar has had all the strings taken off for some reason. For routine string changes, as Tim says below swapping one at a time will reduce flex on the soundboard, and anyway is quicker.) One tip when stringing in the future is to tighten the strings together. In other words don't, say, start with all slack strings and tighten ...


1

I recommend finding a repair person to fix this. If you don't have the proper tools, you might break it more. But, if you truly want to try, This video might help. He basically takes off the strings, bridge, and string pegs. Then, he glues the bridge back on, after taking the old glue and crud off. This guy IS a professional who has obviously done this ...


1

That sort of pinging noise usually happens because strings are getting caught on the nut, so the first thing I’d try is lubricating the nut with graphite like you’ve already done for the bridge. If that doesn’t help, there’s another popular trick to keep your strings smooth at the bridge, which can also keep strings from breaking prematurely. Find some ...


1

It's going to depend on the gauge of strings you're using. The heavier gauges will benefit from more / tighter springs (I'm talking about Strat. type whammies here, but think the same process occurs). Even with light gauge strings, a tighter set up will give less movement on the bridge. Even when you've learned to bend properly - take a 'pre-bend as an ...



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