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8

Usually this sort of hum or buzz is because of the resistor in the volume pot. When the volume is at 10, the resistor is not being used. This means that the pickup is essentially directly connected to the amp. There's no chance for 60 cycle hum to enter the signal except through bad cables, etc. When below 10 the resistor itself will pick up 60 cycle ...


7

Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


6

It could be one of these three things: The neck is bowing outward. It could be caused by the construction of the guitar, the tension of the strings or the dryness of where you're keeping the guitar. If it's a construction issue and the guitar is nice enough, you can get it repaired. If it's the humidity, there are little guitar humidifier sponges you ...


6

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


5

While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all ...


5

If both guitars buzz with light strings but not with heavier strings, then there are a couple of options. I'm assuming the buzz is happening when the string touches a fret somewhere near the middle of its vibrating length; if the buzz is at the nut or bridge or somewhere else, then this line of thinking does not apply. You could switch to a heavier gauge, ...


4

From personal experience as well as working with well respected engineers, guitar amps make noises. A lot of time this has to do with the type of amp and setup that you are going for. Sure, you can get a fairly clean sound out of certain amps/guitars but if you're playing a rock setup, your amp will be making some noise. This is only really an issue if ...


4

The buzzing is due to the string rattling against one of the frets. You need to press down with your finger on the D string directly behind the fret. Your finger is too far from the fret so the string is rattling against it.


3

As others have said, this could be an issue with the neck of the guitar. With steel-string guitars, an issue like this might be fixable with a truss-rod adjustment, but classical guitars don't normally have truss rods, so you'd have to take it to a Luthier or guitar tech for a diagnosis and/or repair. However, here are a couple of areas to investigate ...


3

I found this very helpful link: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php and I found out I had ground loops; removing them improved the issue a lot. There is much more shielding stuff to do in this link, requiring more material and time, so I definitely recommend it.


2

It's possible that an object in the room is vibrating when certain strings are played. This has happened to me a couple of times; a metal picture frame on my wall was buzzing ever so slightly, but enough to be bothersome when I played the bass notes on my guitar. My classical is a lower end model with a laminated top that sounds quite bassy, whereas the ...


2

It is not normal for new strings. If your old strings didn't buzz, then your new strings may have lighter gauge and therefore the guitar fretboard is too flat. You may need to adjust the truss rod, replace the bridge saddle or get a new heavier gauge set of strings. By the way - do not wait for the strings to get rusty in order to change them. If at all ...


2

I'll expand a bit on my comment at the request of OP. I haven't had this exact problem on any of my fretless basses but I can tell you what steps I would take if I did encounter something like this. Since you said the buzzing is coming from the nut side of the note, it might be some sort of mechanical buzz either from the tuners on the headstock or the truss ...


2

@Kevin Johnsrude is correct, but I will add to his list here: It is possible for a guitar to have problems with buzzing that are not caused by the guitarist. The action may be too low. The frets may be too warn. The neck may be warped. Also placing your finger on the string is an art. The target area on your fingers that produces good tone is smaller than ...


2

Most fret buzzing is a result of the vibrating string contacting another fret as it vibrates in an oscillating arc. There are several things that commonly cause this to happen. Neck does not have enough relief or has a back bow. The vibrating/oscillating string must clear all the frets between where it is fretted and the bridge. If the neck is ...


2

It's the guitar. Check whether it buzzes on all frets or only part of them. While you're at it, check the other strings as well at frets you don't usually play. Here you can find a table qualifying the buzzing problems by type.


2

It could be either - or a combination of both faulty guitar set up and playing technique that needs refinement. Wheat's answer is spot on. I would like to point out that it is normal and very common (pretty much the rule) that beginning guitar players experience buzzing or muting (or both) on many chords. It takes repetitive practice to master the proper ...


1

Ways to Fix the buzzing sound on your Guitar Note: Any loose part on your guitar may buzz audibly, when certain notes are played. Say, suppose you knock on the body of the guitar and the buzz appears to come from the neck, then there’s probably something loose on the neck or headstock. If the noise or the buzz occurs only when you tap on the back, there’s ...


1

There are several possible sources of buzzing on a guitar (or any stringed instrument). If you're good with tools and not afraid of ruining your guitar you could try to fix it yourself; otherwise take it to a qualified person. The most usual reasons for buzzing strings on a guitar are: one or more frets are too high or too low, which can be a problem ...


1

If the string is pressed down all the way to the fretboard, it should not buzz. Not just right behind the fret in question but anywhere (right after the previous fret is a bit theoretical since it's rather hard to go all the way there so it's a bit of an irrelevant point). That's the basic balance between fret height and fingerboard. If it doesn't buzz ...


1

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is no... The device you linked to is a Behringer mixer. It is not designed to record audio to your computer. Although you could do it in theory, it's not the right way to record. Like some other folks have suggested, your best bet would be to invest in a low-cost audio interface with a high impedance input for your ...


1

Most likely it is a problem with the frets or set up on the guitar. One common issue that comes up with guitars that have been played for awhile on the treble strings is that the frets under the thinner strings will develop grooves or divots - (worn spots where the strings come in contact with them). To determine if this is an issue with your guitar, ...


1

What have you hooked up to it? Does it buzz when you have nothing plugged in and turn up the volume? If so, it is the amp. If not, you may have created a ground loop. In that case, a DI box will hopefully break it.


1

This seems odd- I can see why you'd be confused. Logically, the common element making the G string buzz if yourself, as you've now tried 3 x guitars ! However I'm sure you've tried checking the string open & on the frets on all guitars. I'd suggest this : Try playing just that string, open, and on all frets, to see how hard you have to oluck it ...


1

Assuming that it has been tuned correctly, it is not normal. The old strings were probably 11s or maybe 12s, so there should be no problems if there weren't previously.Do they buzz open, on specific frets, maybe there is another problem with the guitar that has manifested itself when the strings were changed. Were they changed for a particular reason ? Like ...


1

I know this sounds really sketchy and wont look very pretty, but I had the same problem with one of my classical guitars and I found that the nut and the bridge had a tiny chip in the slot where the string would usually sit. So I put a tiny piece of masking tape over that par of the nut and bridge and then put the string back in. It worked fine.


1

Could you please post pics of your frets ? In fact, another problem could be that the frets you mention are a bit "used", and the string, when pressed on them, gets a bit nearer to the bar than it should...


1

If you have several strings all buzzing on the same fret or range of frets, it could be a sign that your neck is slightly too straight. If the neck was totally straight, you would have buzzing all over the place (or very high action to compensate, to the point of unplayability). Since you have two strings that seem to be having a problem on the third fret ...



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