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9

These are known as stickings. Use only one row of stickings at a time. Depending on context, a repeat sign as well as a set of alternate stickings could mean either to play one sticking and then switch to the other on the second time, or to choose a sticking but use the same sticking throughout. Your no. 8 example, for instance offers a basic alternating ...


6

A single bassline can be harmonized in a number of different ways. Assuming you are working only with diatonic triads (three note chords that require no accidentals), you'll typically have three options for your harmony for each note. In the key of G major, those options look like this: G: I, vi6, IV64 A: ii, viiĀ°6, V64 B: iii, I6, vi64 C: IV, ii6, ...


5

Casey Rule gave a fine answer, I just want to point out a few things about harmonizing in general and you should be aware of while trying to harmonize a bass line. iii chords are quite rare in a major key, in fact in all my classical theory studies I don't remember analyzing anything that used any type of iii chord in a major key. While viiĀ° is a viable ...


5

The earliest two references I can find of what are now known as deceptive cadences originate with Josquin des Prez's Missa Una musque de Buscaya (listed without a date on Wikipedia, which only fleetingly mentions it under a different spelling, suggesting that his authorship is doubtful) and Francesco Spinacino's arrangement of Fortuna dun gran tempo. I was ...


3

In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


3

It seems like every theory program has a different name for this Ic construction. I admit I have never seen it called that, though I have seen a variety of other names, including I6/4, V6/4, and just plain not labeling the chord. Nevertheless, the idea is the same. The chord labeled Ic is not a functional chord. Rather, it is a double suspension over the ...


3

This is certainly not universally accepted, but I say a half-step isn't really a fixed entity; rather there are a couple of different "half"-steps of different size that can serve different purposes. That particular leading vii-I step, according to some performers – Pablo Casals was perhaps the most radical propagator of this idea – should be ...


3

In minor the cadences are defined the following way: Half: Any -> V(7) Authentic: V(7) -> i Deceptive: V(7)-> VI The 7th in the V chord is optional. If you know you are in the key of G minor then building the chords shouldn't be a problem. This exercise seems it want you to understand what a cadence is and what a related chord(i.e. chords that have a ...


1

Well, the reductive answer is that there's nothing special about it and that the only thing that makes a leading tone "want" to resolve to the tonic is hundreds of years of musical convention, since this tendency exists in a Western scale but not necessarily in other scales. The tuning of the Western scale has changed a lot over the course of those hundreds ...


1

I believe this is a practice exercise where the point is to practice using different patterns of left and right hand strikes, to become accustomed to striking the drum head repeatedly with the same hand in different rhythms, to develop agility.


1

With respect to your second question, I would say in this case yes, it would be a perfect cadence. B --> E is V --> I (key of Emin in this example). This is the same as representing B as the viii(dim) and E as the iii in the key of Cmaj.



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