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9

These are known as stickings. Use only one row of stickings at a time. Depending on context, a repeat sign as well as a set of alternate stickings could mean either to play one sticking and then switch to the other on the second time, or to choose a sticking but use the same sticking throughout. Your no. 8 example, for instance offers a basic alternating ...


7

A single bassline can be harmonized in a number of different ways. Assuming you are working only with diatonic triads (three note chords that require no accidentals), you'll typically have three options for your harmony for each note. In the key of G major, those options look like this: G: I, vi6, IV64 A: ii, viiĀ°6, V64 B: iii, I6, vi64 C: IV, ii6, ...


5

Casey Rule gave a fine answer, I just want to point out a few things about harmonizing in general and you should be aware of while trying to harmonize a bass line. iii chords are quite rare in a major key, in fact in all my classical theory studies I don't remember analyzing anything that used any type of iii chord in a major key. While viiĀ° is a viable ...


5

The earliest two references I can find of what are now known as deceptive cadences originate with Josquin des Prez's Missa Una musque de Buscaya (listed without a date on Wikipedia, which only fleetingly mentions it under a different spelling, suggesting that his authorship is doubtful) and Francesco Spinacino's arrangement of Fortuna dun gran tempo. I was ...


3

This is certainly not universally accepted, but I say a half-step isn't really a fixed entity; rather there are a couple of different "half"-steps of different size that can serve different purposes. That particular leading vii-I step, according to some performers – Pablo Casals was perhaps the most radical propagator of this idea – should be ...


3

In minor the cadences are defined the following way: Half: Any -> V(7) Authentic: V(7) -> i Deceptive: V(7)-> VI The 7th in the V chord is optional. If you know you are in the key of G minor then building the chords shouldn't be a problem. This exercise seems it want you to understand what a cadence is and what a related chord(i.e. chords that have a ...


3

In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


3

It seems like every theory program has a different name for this Ic construction. I admit I have never seen it called that, though I have seen a variety of other names, including I6/4, V6/4, and just plain not labeling the chord. Nevertheless, the idea is the same. The chord labeled Ic is not a functional chord. Rather, it is a double suspension over the ...


3

Try Twentieth-Century Harmony: Creative Aspects and Practice by Vincent Persichetti. While it is not based on functional harmony, it has a section that specifically addresses the sounds made by combining different triads, as well as tetrachords, and it gives literal descriptions of how these chords "sound" ("acidic" and other descriptive adjectives). Also, ...


3

It is half cadence, but I will try to explain it to you as simply as I can: It will not give the listener the 'ending' feel. The ending feel will be on the V-I. The way someone listens to the V7/V - V is like this: Uh? This is a really dissonant chord (V7/V) No wait, it wasn't dissonant; it sounds good with this one (V) But because the V has the ...


2

Secondary dominants were classified as "modulations" by 18th and 19th century music theorists, and the term "transient modulation" was used when the modulation only lasted for the two chords in question, but in the 20th century they were re-classified as "secondary dominants" which could appear before a chord on any degree of the scale. Aurally, you don't ...


1

You nearly answered it yourself. Calling the last chord V makes it unfinished - an imperfect cadence (half). What happened to get to the V doesn't really come into the equation, although, as Bob says, that in itself may be considered a perfect cadence - but only when the part is in that key. As in the key of G - which it isn't.


1

Assuming that you still feel C Major as the home key, and haven't modulated to G Major, this is a half-cadence (imperfect). Although, I see why you are asking the question; the movement V7/V to V is harmonically the same as a V7-I perfect cadence in the dominant, G Major. But it is functionally different with respect to C Major.


1

Well, the reductive answer is that there's nothing special about it and that the only thing that makes a leading tone "want" to resolve to the tonic is hundreds of years of musical convention, since this tendency exists in a Western scale but not necessarily in other scales. The tuning of the Western scale has changed a lot over the course of those hundreds ...


1

"...the particular role/reputation of each chord in a movement..." The key term you're looking for here is functional harmony. In a typical harmonic analysis, you determine what the chords are in terms of their root (e.g. 4th scale degree) and their quality (e.g. major chord, with a major 7th) to determine the name of the chord (e.g. IVmaj7). In functional ...


1

The vocabularly allowed for cadences in AMEB grade 4 theory are the following chords: I, ii, IV, V and vi. You are not allowed to use V7 until grade 6 theory otherwise it would be ideal for the final cadence. You are also allowed to harmonize other parts of the melody with first inversion chords but not the cadences so the chords that you are allowed to use ...


1

Two thoughts: Look at the linear shape of the melody. Notice implied harmonies for each measure. Consider which notes might be important (clear chord tones) and which ones are less important (neighbor and / or passing tones). Look at how the melody is accented agogically. Notice which notes have longer durations than others. In a melody, longer notes ...


1

It might be easiest to work backwards -- the most obvious cadence point is going to be the last few notes. You can bet the last chord is expected to be the I, D major. Prior to that you would expect a V(7) or occasionally the IV. We see an E in the melody so assume V7, or A7 in our key of D. Just before that is an F#, what might that be? It doesn't ...


1

A cadence point is, to a melody, what the punctuation is in a sentence. Cadences are "points of rest" or "points of resolution". You create cadences by completing a chord progression, often but not always ending in a I chord. When that chord progression is completed, the next one begins. So you should look in this melody for logical places to create ...


1

I believe this is a practice exercise where the point is to practice using different patterns of left and right hand strikes, to become accustomed to striking the drum head repeatedly with the same hand in different rhythms, to develop agility.


1

A couple comments may help. A perfect cadence is distinguished from an imperfect cadence by its dominant->tonic motion in the melody, not necessarily in the harmony. When describing the harmonic properties of the mode, it's simpler to consider the example to be in the key of the mode itself, not the relative ionian scale. So E-phrygian is harmonized i ...


1

With respect to your second question, I would say in this case yes, it would be a perfect cadence. B --> E is V --> I (key of Emin in this example). This is the same as representing B as the viii(dim) and E as the iii in the key of Cmaj.



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