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"...the particular role/reputation of each chord in a movement..." The key term you're looking for here is functional harmony. In a typical harmonic analysis, you determine what the chords are in terms of their root (e.g. 4th scale degree) and their quality (e.g. major chord, with a major 7th) to determine the name of the chord (e.g. IVmaj7). In functional ...


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Music has not always been written with chords in mind. Throughout history, there have been different relationships between notes that formed stylistic zeitgeists that we now think of as musical periods. Historically, there have been certain chord progressions that have been common, but few composers wrote toward a specific progression; the way much ...


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Two thoughts: Look at the linear shape of the melody. Notice implied harmonies for each measure. Consider which notes might be important (clear chord tones) and which ones are less important (neighbor and / or passing tones). Look at how the melody is accented agogically. Notice which notes have longer durations than others. In a melody, longer notes ...


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It might be easiest to work backwards -- the most obvious cadence point is going to be the last few notes. You can bet the last chord is expected to be the I, D major. Prior to that you would expect a V(7) or occasionally the IV. We see an E in the melody so assume V7, or A7 in our key of D. Just before that is an F#, what might that be? It doesn't ...


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A cadence point is, to a melody, what the punctuation is in a sentence. Cadences are "points of rest" or "points of resolution". You create cadences by completing a chord progression, often but not always ending in a I chord. When that chord progression is completed, the next one begins. So you should look in this melody for logical places to create ...


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Cadence points can be at the end of each line, but definitely at the end of a verse or chorus.It could, for the quoted question, be the end of each phrase, and probably is. In this case, taking the end of the first line, it's an imperfect cadence, I-V, the second line ending on a perfect cadence, V-I, probably playing the V on the last beat of bar 7. Yes, ...



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