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Cadences articulate structure; the stronger the cadence, the more important that structural point. You'll never find a composer employing an inverted V or a vii moving to chord to a root position I at a point in a piece that requires the great structural clarity, such as the end of a period, a section, a modulation etc. Root movement = strength. iii-I is ...


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The authentic cadence V7 - I actually has several things going for it. One crucial element you're missing is the movement of the bass. Basses going down a fifth or up a fourth are very powerful and is one of the main reason this works. The movement from iii to I however is quite weak. Another element is the tritone between the 3rd and the 7th of the chord. ...


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To be honest, I've never really bought the idea that the leading tone is all that important in a perfect cadence. How does that explain the pull of say ii7 , V(open fifth) to the Tonic. You could argue that the leading tone is implied in a Major key, but to be honest, I think the jazzier v7 I (yes minor 7th) has more of a pull than a lot of those leading ...


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The root movement of dominant to tonic in an authentic cadence is very powerful -- even more, it could be argued, than the leading tone movement. No other cadential formula has this.


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One important factor that influences how good these progressions sound is the number of common tones between the two successive chords. If we consider vii°-I, there are no common tones between the chords ({B,D,F} vs. {C,E,G}) so all the voices must move, making it a bit rough. On the other hand, if we look at V-I, we see that there is one common tone ...


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Taking C as the key, there's also Bo (inc. Do,Fo and Abo) that leads nicely to the tonic, C. And the triton of G (the dominant), which is C#7.They're probably not so common as they sound a little strange to people who are immersed in only Pop music. V and V7 are obviously far more commonly used, so it's down to familiarity. Which, in jazz players, will often ...


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Wikipedia has a nice explanation for what a cadence is: A harmonic cadence is a progression of (at least) two chords that concludes a phrase, section, or piece of music. There have to be at least two chords to create a cadence. But in your example Imaj7-I, there is only one chord. Just because you remove the major 7th, the chord doesn't change; it's ...


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As you know, the II V I progression is the most important progression in jazz. Since there is a very strong root motion of a descending perfect fifth, not only between V and I, but also between II and V, this II-V-progression has become an independent unit, which is frequently used without the need to resolve to the related I chord. It is important to ...


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As a cadence, it's called imperfect - the opposite of perfect, it doesn't quite arrive back at home like most of us expect. In Satin doll, instead, it goes to other ii-Vs which further confound the listener who feels a modulation to another key. It does actually land at the end of the sequence on bar 7. The middle section then moves to subdom F, then ...


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Let's take a scale. Your example is most likely in the D minor scale. The V of the D minor scale is A7. Let's take the A major scale. The V of the A major scale is E7. So, what the composer in your example is doing, is to 'leave' from the D minor scale for a little while and 'go' to the A major scale. It is pretty common to use more than one scale in a ...


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Any dominant seventh chord is crying out to resolve to a chord a fourth above. As in G7 will (apart from in blues!) most often be followed by C. In your example, the A7 will move to a D or Dm. A fourth above. The concept is common in music. Take a piece in C. It goes to E, then A, then D, then G, and back to C. All up a fourth. Feels and sounds right, ...


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You've stumbled onto secondary dominants. In the key of D, yes, "E" would be the second degree, however, when spelling the chord: E, G#, B, D, the G# is not diatonic to D major. Essentially, the E7 functions like a V chord in the key of A, and then A7 of course functions as a V7 back to D. To clarify: A secondary dominant is any chord other than the ...



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