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In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


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Well, the reductive answer is that there's nothing special about it and that the only thing that makes a leading tone "want" to resolve to the tonic is hundreds of years of musical convention, since this tendency exists in a Western scale but not necessarily in other scales. The tuning of the Western scale has changed a lot over the course of those hundreds ...


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This is certainly not universally accepted, but I say a half-step isn't really a fixed entity; rather there are a couple of different "half"-steps of different size that can serve different purposes. That particular leading vii-I step, according to some performers – Pablo Casals was perhaps the most radical propagator of this idea – should be ...


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Remember that iif you do the dominant with its seventh added that the seventh has to resolve. Also like always the leading tone has to resolve in the voice it appears. In g minor this means the F# has to resolve to the G. If the Cadence is at the end of the peace we would like to end on tonic chord and we would keep both the chords in root position as to ...


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In minor the cadences are defined the following way: Half: Any -> V(7) Authentic: V(7) -> i Deceptive: V(7)-> VI The 7th in the V chord is optional. If you know you are in the key of G minor then building the chords shouldn't be a problem. This exercise seems it want you to understand what a cadence is and what a related chord(i.e. chords that have a ...



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