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16

If you are currently playing it in the key of C and want to use the same finger shapes for D just pop the capo on your 2nd fret. This shifts everything up 2 semitones, ie. from C to D. But as Wheat mentioned in his comment, if you learn different finger shapes, you can play in any key without using a capo. Most users of capos use them either for ease (if ...


15

The capo allows you to play open chords/notes from wherever you have barred the neck. And gives you access to certain voicing not easily achievable in a particular key otherwise. And thats about it really.


12

There is nothing wrong with using a capo, if it makes the sound you want. Having said that, the barred shapes you are using are pretty simple ones, and it will be worthwhile learning to play them without a capo. In your example you are raising the pitch of the whole song by 5 semitones. So: The Am becomes a Dm The E becomes an A The A7 becomes a D7 The ...


11

I would certainly not leave the capo on my fretboard when not in use. I cannot say it visibly hurts the neck for sure but it does wear out the strings. Here is a wonderful piece of advice from Lee Griffith in his article, A Capo is a Wonderful Thing: One caution is important to mention. Do not leave the capo on the instrument when not playing it. The ...


11

If you are playing with a singer who can only sing in a certain key range, then capos can become invaluable. They essentially let you shift the key of a song up or down (depending on the singer's range) without having to relearn the actual chords of the song that you play. An example of this would be in 'The Smiths.' Johnny Marr would regularly capo his ...


11

Usually the reason a capo pulls your guitar out of tune is because it has too much force relative to the height of your frets. If you have super high frets, or jumbos, then you can test this by fretting a string, picking a note, and then alternating how much pressure you apply to the fretted note. You should hear the note bend in pitch slightly unless your ...


11

The capo can affect your tuning in two ways: by pulling the strings down towards the fretboard when you clamp it down and pulling them sideways accross the fingerboard when you are putting it on or taking it off. Pulling strings stretches them slightly and can cause them to go out of tune if you have some leeway in the windings on the capstan or in the worm ...


10

I think the most important things that I have learned during my years fiddling with a Guitar is to desperately work on honing the accuracy of your picking instead of going at the strings like a madman (if you'll pardon the expression :D). I often used to play with a heavy hand; any time I wasn't soloing, i.e. picking individual strings, I was hammering more ...


9

To elaborate further what Wheat and Dr. Mayhem mean about playing without the capotasto [yes, I had to look it up]. You can transpose the chords in your head, from C to D, by shifting each chord up a whole step. So when you read C, play D. When you read D, play E. When you read Am, play Bm. Etc. Playing with all barre-chords can be a useful intermediate ...


9

This depends upon what you mean by "music is in the key of…" and "I want to play it in the key of…". If you mean that you want to play chords written in the key of C and have them sound in the key of Eb, put the capo on fret 3. Eb is three semitones higher than C (C-C#-D-Eb). (This seems likely.) If you want to play chords written in the key of Eb and have ...


8

I think this is more a question of the quality of the capo you have, I used a Dunlop Trigger Capo for a couple of years without any issues; I gave that away years ago and haven't bought another, but as far as I know, its still in use by the guy I gave it to. I would be interested to see an example of the type of capo you have. One thing that might shorten ...


7

It entirely depends what you want to play. A capo is for transposing a piece up by some number of semitones, without changing the fingering. So let's look at ways to transpose those pieces without a capo -- it will often involve changing the fingering: If the piece does not contain any open strings, you don't need a capo. Just play the piece with your ...


7

Clamp capo (above called a normal capo) is a spring capo that clamps over the strings. Kysers are my preferred clamp capo these days. Shubb capo uses a screw and a locking lever to attach the capo to the guitar neck. Band capo is a capo secured by an elastic or fabric band that clamps over the strings. You can slide an elastic band capo up and down the neck ...


6

I don't think your problem lies in the capo. Have you checked your intonation on your guitars? If you don't know how to do that, there are many good advice in this forum for how to setup a guitar. You can also take it to your luthier. You should tune your guitar after you put on your capo, this way you minimize the errors in intonation. (It's good to ...


6

If your guitar's intonation is spot-on, the frets are all straight, the neck isn't warped, and the guitar has been strung meticulously, using a good capo that doesn't clamp down on the strings too hard won't throw your guitar out of tune. (See below for more information on specific capos.) However, most guitars aren't perfect like this, and the reality is ...


6

I think @Tim already answer your first question. Yes, it's a spider capo, which can grab only selected strings, so you can do some cool stuff. There are: Normal capo, obviously which holds all of the strings. Slider capo or roller capo, it can slide easily from one fret to another fret without releasing the capo from holding the neck. Spider capo, I ...


6

Although your question is a little ambiguous, I'm guessing that you want to play music written in Eb, using chords in C, but keeping the music sounding in Eb. So, you put the capo on fret 3 and rewrite all your chords three semitones lower. However, just giving you this answer won't help you understand how to work out where to put a capo should you need to ...


4

My question is, why do you want to leave the capo on the guitar all the time? To keep the guitar in a higher-than-normal pitch, or to lower the action? A properly set-up guitar will have very low action without buzzing, equally as low as you'd get with a capo in place. It is also a lot more fun to play. If you want higher than standard tuning, then take ...


4

To play in the key of D with the 'C shape,' you'd want to capo your guitar on the second fret. Each fret represents a half step and there are two half steps from C to D (so if you capoed on the first fret you'd be playing in C# with the 'C shape'). The reason I use the term 'C shape' is because I learned very early in my playing about the CAGED method which ...


4

When you use a Capo you basically just change the key the song is in, in this case you go up 5 frets. This means you are not playing Am E A7 Dm anymore, but Dm A D7 Gm. You can play these chords now whereever you're comfortable, and sing as you would play with a capo in the 5th fret. This process is called transposition (you find a brief explanation here, ...


3

Looks like you have room to back your capo off from the low E slightly, which could help your thumb fit in. Beyond that, try turning your thumb in towards the guitar a bit and extending it straight up, then pulling it down against the edge of the neck so that the fleshy bit sticks over the edge and pulls the string down to the fretboard. Doesn't work for ...


3

Even though this is a guitar question, the easiest way to think about this is to visualise a piano keyboard. Going up one fret on your guitar, is equivalent to going up one key on the piano - including the black keys. So when you finger the first fret of the E string, you are playing an F. When you finger the second fret of the E string, you are playing ...


3

Can't answer your question per se, but to enlighten about that particular capo. It's a SPIDER, and can be used on just about any guitar, including, obviously, bass (Up to 6 string!). The idea is that it can, if so desired, capo as many or few strings as necessary. For instance, if one wanted,say, the E and A on bass to remain as open low notes, but needed ...


3

E♭ is three semitones above C. So you should put the capo on the third fret. Some of the other answers are quite thorough, but it is really a simple answer!


2

For the sake of a thorough answer, there are some new electric guitars that have recently appeared on the market that make use of what is refered to as a "digital capo". They can be configured to use built-in digital signal processing to raise or lower the pitch of the strings by digital pitch-shifting, while the actual tuning of the physical strings stays ...


2

Definitely check your intonation before you try anything else. However, it is possible to detune a guitar that has perfect intonation with a capo. My guitar has perfect intonation but the capo sharpens almost 20 hz to the tuning on my guitar, which is outrageous. Try this, fret your guitar on the 12th fret of your 1st string, check the tuning there. It ...


2

I believe many other guitarists will agree that it becomes progressively easier to find notes and the absolute position of your hand on the instrument. For a beginner these markings are vital to develop this sense of location and you should exploit their potential. I don't think having them is a bad idea at all, you'll soon be bored of searching for them ...



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