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3

E♭ is three semitones above C. So you should put the capo on the third fret. Some of the other answers are quite thorough, but it is really a simple answer!


1

I think I know exactly what you mean, so I will just give a simple answer in case you are confused by the others (but I highly recommend studying them, anyway). The answer is to place the capo over the 3rd fret. This makes your "C Chord shape" (what you would play to get a C chord should there be no capo at all) be an Eb chord. Thus, you can easily ...


2

Simple, completely effective answer: For Eb, don't use a capo. Rather, lower the tuning of each string. Re-tune the strings, low to high, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Bb, Eb. Then play the regular chord shapes that you already know.


2

I think the other answers are good, but wanted to condense the most important bit into one answer. You just have to count the semitones. Here are all the notes, and the number of semitones they are away from A. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A D is five semitones up from ...


6

Although your question is a little ambiguous, I'm guessing that you want to play music written in Eb, using chords in C, but keeping the music sounding in Eb. So, you put the capo on fret 3 and rewrite all your chords three semitones lower. However, just giving you this answer won't help you understand how to work out where to put a capo should you need to ...


9

This depends upon what you mean by "music is in the key of…" and "I want to play it in the key of…". If you mean that you want to play chords written in the key of C and have them sound in the key of Eb, put the capo on fret 3. Eb is three semitones higher than C (C-C#-D-Eb). (This seems likely.) If you want to play chords written in the key of Eb and have ...



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