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18

I assume it's french "si l'on veut" - "at one's pleasure" - "ad libitum". It means that the performer may decide freely playing the triples as written or to octavate them (as IMHO it isn't a slur but a 8va bracket).


12

There may be a small amount of "performance practice fad" about that, but for the most part it does serve a purpose. Breath is used in many styles of music as a cue. If you think about wind instrument players, for example, every phrase is preceded by a breath, and experienced players will take that breath in rhythm. As a rhythmic gesture, it can be used to ...


11

If your wife is a violinist there are many things than can be transposed from violin to cello in the search for quality. Don't forget the bow. There are so many things... I will try to make a real answer in the coming hours and days by editing this one, I feel I have not yet touched 1/10th of what should be given. But first, have you considered renting? ...


8

It is certainly acceptable to play notes in various ways - whether or not the conductor wants you to do that is up to him, but you should certainly be able to get higher volume by using two strings. Not sure what you mean by 'sacrifice assurance' - if you are worried about your position, you should just look at where you are moving to after this not. If it ...


7

Yes it is quite common. The technical term for this is double stop. Note, that independent of form of the bow the hairs are just fixed at the tip and the frog. So the hairs have really no choice but to form a straight line (but are deformed by contact with the strings). Even since the string arrangement is curved, it is easy to find an angle, where the bow ...


6

The opening of the Sarabande, Bach Cello Suite No.2 has a D written to be played on both the D and the G string simultaneously, so Bach seems to have thought it was OK - this is not for volume but colour. Some editions call for the D to be played using 1st finger, others 2nd finger, but it doesn't seem to diminish the quality of the open D string. It is ...


6

I agree with Michael's answer. But there is another point of view : If you are considering composing a piece with this chord, especially if it is to be played with the bow, I would advise you to consider having two cellos or two different string players forming it (for instance if it is with a sufficiently high E or F# to be played by a viola or a violin). ...


5

The answer to the main question in the title is : NO, be firm but as light as possible in your grip ! But it may take time to be achieved, and it does not always come naturally. Now to the details and the very good points you mention the bumping cello A cello is quite heavy, and is usually putting most of its weight on the pique and the upper ...


5

3/4 means three quarters size as opposed to full size. The tuning can be the same, but the scale length is different, which means string length and tension (and thickness) are different. So while you use the same techniques, the finger positioning will vary. The reason for these different size instruments is the difference in tonal quality. The resonant ...


5

Basic background A cello has four strings, tuned in fifths: C, G, D, A (just below middle C). Double Stops It is possible to simultaneously play any two strings that are next to each other. The bowing is generally not difficult. To be realistic, though, you also have to consider the fingering. Some limitations to consider are: The left hand can only ...


5

It will all depend on the octave -- the lowest E natural and F# are impossible since they both need to be played on the lowest string C (unless you want to tune the G string down to F#). In higher octaves it ranges from "possible" (if using the thumb or playing in higher positions on lower strings) to easy. If you'll be writing for double stops a lot, I ...


5

The easiest way to play those pitches as double stops is as a minor 7th with the F# on bottom. Both F#2 – E3 and F#3 – E4 are quite easy. If you're looking specifically for the major 2nd with E on the bottom you are moving into much less common territory. E4–F#4 is almost certainly the easiest; an octave lower is quite a bit more stretch required unless it's ...


5

Short answer: for an electric cello, there is no basic difficulty in playing left-handed apart from the bridge and the nut, if you have already learned the cello left-handed. Most electric cellos feature a wood bridge, and its arc shape and groves correspond to the fingerboard's shape and string gauges. The main custom thing you will need is the bridge but ...


4

Ultimately it is subjective, and it is worth learning both the scordatura and normal versions; however, I find the scordatura version more satisfying to play, personally. One place in particular is the G-D-G chord before the start of the fugue. In scordatura, the top G can be played with an open string, so all three pitches can ring simultaneously. In ...


4

It can be used for communication, as already pointed out - and this certainly seems to be the most cited explanation when you query that of a musician who seems to be doing it excessively! Showing emotion is also a common reason given, that it somehow brings out more authenticity and heartfelt contrast in the piece. However: What is up with that? Is ...


4

It is common to play double-stops, certainly in solo pieces; and indeed also quite common to play 3- or 4-voice chords (these need to be "broken", i.e. you quickly excite the low strings and let them ring, then pull the bow up and sustain the high strings). Indeed the multi-stringedness might have something to do with what you call "synthetic" sound you're ...


4

I don't play cello, but I'll answer this based on what I do on double bass. Simple answer: You can play two strings together. It is common to play several strings together. how many strings are typically played during a piece? All of them. I think you wanted to ask how many strings are typically played simultaneously during a piece? Αnd the ...


4

Usually the three-quarter or other smaller than standard violins are for younger, smaller children. A full sized violin would be way too much for a three or four year old to handle. The bow is appropriately smaller, as well. The spoken lengths of the strings are obviously in proportion, and a child will have to re-adapt when it grows big enough for the next ...


4

Very interesting !! Just listened to the opening bars, and it's in C#minor. That's probably why it sounds like a C#, not a D. Now whether the recording has been slowed down a smidgen is conjecture, or whether the cello is actually tuned differently I don't know. So, yes it sounds like C# 'cos it is. Couldn't find one in 'Dm'.Unless, of course, the tuning was ...


3

There are some things that will make you lose less: a big revelation for me was when I realized I was using way more bow and force than necessary. A combination of weight (literal weight, let gravity do more of the work than muscle) and a slow stroke using minimal bow length helped a lot. Also, the examples here are amplified; if possible, practice the ...


3

For a given instrument (violin, viola, cello, bass is more complicated), the tuning of a fractional size instrument (1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 are commonly seen, 7/8 used to be frequently called "lady's cello") is always the same as the full size instrument. viola is a bit complicated because professionals have different sizes (15', 16', sometimes 17' for ...


3

I see several advantages to your fellow cellist's suggestion. By starting from the A on the D string and then pivoting your bow to have both strings under your bow, you have more progression and more power under control to achieve the loudest tone possible at the end of the crescendo. By bowing the two upper strings at the same time, you can apply more ...


3

I believe this could be it. There's also a cheaper piano reduction available. Here is a sample page. From the description: Like every other great 19th-century solo concerto, Dvorák’s famous Cello Concerto was a collaboration between composer and virtuoso. It has long been known that certain solo passages in Dvorák’s autograph score were actually written ...


2

According to this guy, this type of fast Spiccato should actually be called Sautille: He gives a good demonstration of how to go about it in that video. Perhaps you should also watch ...


2

I have been a string player for many years (Double Bass), and the fact of the matter is that bowing an instrument is a very aerobic exercise, especially at a fast tempo; but, even doing long slow notes is a kin to sustaining a long hum vocally.


2

A major 9th double stop is not possible using just the four fingers in conventional position -- in that case the maximum double stop would be a minor seventh (or a major seventh with an extension). However, it is possible using an extended thumb position, especially if the notes are high (e.g. the lower note around an octave above the string on which it's ...


2

1/4, 2/4... 4/4 are instrument proportion measurements. A child will often play in a 1,2 or 3 quarters of original size (4/4). Normally a professional instrument is a 4/4 size. The term 4/4 is most used in Schools/Student context. What changes between them is the string length, and with that the space between fingers to tune properly. The proportion between ...


2

In the bass world, size matters. :) Very few players use a full size bass (it's huge), except some orchestral players. The standard size is ⅞, and ¾ size basses are popular, too.


1

Samuel, There are many great answers above, here's a bit more. I play the cello, and as mentioned above, you can play 2 strings at a time. This is known as a double stop. It is quite common and I think it sounds great. If you're utilizing sampled cello sounds, you'll definitely meet a challenge in trying to make it sound convincing or realistic. However if ...


1

The answer to this question depends of course from person to person. Myself and many colleagues think of the bow to the violin as the diaphragm is to a singer. Like that we talk sometimes about "breathing" with the bow. Not forced rule like bow up = breath in but to phrase a melodywith the bow as if it was air inside the lungs that has to be enough to sing ...



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