Hot answers tagged

11

I think you should start as if it is a game. Your child should be interested in this game, and its rules should be easy. There is nothing hard about creating a random sound with a harmonica, and at first it will be ok just to leave him to this. Once your son is more familiar with the instrument, you should start the main phase of the learning: Find the ...


9

Unlikely, because unless your child has a genetic reason for being unable to distinguish pitches (which you apparently may, if what you say is true), he or she will soon learn to identify the inaccuracies in your singing. For example, there has been some noise about bilingual families and a fear that the non-native parent will "infect" the child with bad ...


8

I have to say that a household and environment that fosters a love of music will have a large impact on your daughters interest. Likely only piano lessons with an instructor will assess her interest in that particular instrument, but that's really just the tip of the iceberg. There are lots of other instruments, most just as fulfilling, as well as singing ...


6

You should pay attention to your singing. Tone-deafness is a result of a disconnection between what are you hear and what you produce. It is generally fixable through conscious attention. I work developing musical training computer games for children. My mother sang to me as a child, and she is tone-deaf. I also learned to sing in a tone deaf manner. We ...


6

As much as it bothers you, he's actually naturally doing exactly what he should be doing. I'll explain in a moment. Changing voices for boys who sing is primarily difficult for two reasons: the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. Because many books are written on this subject, I will very briefly address each citing information from a text ...


6

There are hundreds of different types of breathing exercises, so I will mention a few and suggest important concepts to cover. 1.) Teach them how to visualize their breathing. This one is extremely important and is the root of good breathing. I always teach my students to think of taking big, large, open, relaxed, deep breaths. 2.) They should be silent. ...


5

I bought my son a 3/4 scale guitar with nylon strings when he was 5 or 6. That gave him enough interest to start learning, then I let him use one of my cheap full scale acoustics with steel strings at age 8 as his hands were big enough. Currently he has taken up bass, so he is learning on a 5 string that my bass player had spare. It is a challenge as he is ...


5

I disliked piano (particularly lessons) until grade 11. Something just changed and now I love it. Some kids will enjoy it right away, but most of the time I hear stories like mine. I was a disciplined kid but most generally aren't, and practising is a drag. A lack of interest may not be a good indicator that you should stop the lessons -- so many people ...


5

It is a whirly tube, corrugaphone, lasso d'amore or bloogle resonator. To be honest, I was not expecting my search for "whirly music tube" to come straight back like that :o) If you Google "buy whirly tube" you'll get a fair few hits. I'm not going to link them as I have no idea how good any of the sites are. In my opinion, "Bloogle Resonator" should be ...


4

In my experience of leading amateur kids choirs, the comfortable range for most 4-8 year olds would be around middle C (or possibly as low as the B flat just below that) up to around D or E -- that is, just over an octave. Many kids would struggle with a low A or a high F, I think.


4

Hearing (or even listening to !) a rookie drummer practising is not easy. From a parent's point of view there has to be dedication to put up with the noise. Provision of a suitable place to practise, where there is enough room for a kit, and neighbours don't get upset, isn't easy. Have a big detached house, or money to provide a rehearsal room. Have a ...


4

I think it may not be the best vantage to try and "assess" the amount of interest. Look at it this way. Your child's interest in music is not set in stone. It's a living part of her, and if nurtured it can grow. A bad instructor can bunk her desire to ever touch the instrument. But your own interest and involvement in her lessons are primary. So don't ...


4

It may be, genetically, that your child has inherited your amusicality. You won't know for a while. In fact, if only you listen to it, then you'll never know! Children tend to believe that their parents are inscrutable, so your out of tune singing may be acceptable as the right way to your child. This will then oppose renditions by others, giving a bit of a ...


3

I see two distinct problems here: The quality of your son's singing, The fact that you have to listen to him doing it. As others have said, it is very difficult to sing well if you cannot hear yourself doing it - as is the case when you have headphones on. However, this is only part of your problem, because singing well requires practice. Your son's age ...


3

Consider a ukulele. "Real" ukuleles are available cheaply (although you can spend a lot on a really lovely one). It suits small hands. It has nylon strings so it's not too difficult to fret. There are plenty of resources for learning real songs to play on the uke. Having fewer strings makes for easier chord shapes. It's a great instrument on which a child ...


3

I started playing guitar at about 7 years old, I got a classical guitar, slightly smaller than the common size -but very slightly (I think it was larger that the '3/4 size', I actually played until I was 20!). The important thing for a child, I'd say, is that the guitar is confortable to play: rather low action and normal-to-low tension strings. Nylon, of ...


3

I think it is wonderful that your child is showing an interest in playing an instrument and making music. You should certainly encourage that desire in any way possible. There are many very good quality smaller size guitars that might be a good fit for a six year old. In order to increase the chances that your child will actually find the experience ...


2

This is around the same age I started playing guitar. The guitar I started on was my dads first guitar which was from the early 60s, it was a catalog guitar nothing fancy. For strings, since I had an electric I had light gauge steel strings.. The way I got hooked was just by listening to the music my dad liked, which is the same music I like now and then.. I ...


2

I agree on quality. You wouldn't want to give a child a pre-war Martin unless you're crazy and rich or he's Chris Thile in the making, but you wouldn't want to give something that pretended to be an instrument, either. Smaller, but not too small, or else the child will rightfully think it's just a toy. Two crucial things to note: If the child is ...


2

I'm not (really) a guitar player, but I have taught beginners as part of a generalist music-lesson gig. The other answers so far are good, but I would add two essential things from my own experience: The fretboard needs to be in tune. Otherwise, the instrument is going to sound really bad. If you're not sure, tune any string with an electronic chromatic ...


2

At four years old free play is best, with age appropriate instruments. You can get some really cute little percussion instruments and whistles made for tiny hands, and you can make instruments with beans for shakers, etc. Formal learning and games can come later, at about six once his musical ability is more developed. I'd also suggest lots of singing of ...


2

I suggest to buy a digital piano and use it for composition. When drawing notes on a computer screen, you do not actually hear immediately the music you compose and can try less variants than just attempting to play directly. From that I tried, as little as telling "press every second white key, together or in a sequence" (so C, Dm, Em, etc) results ...


2

This isn't a great answer if you just want your kids to make music, but if you want to use music making as a vehicle to teach the kids how to program then I'd take a look at Sonic Pi. The founder of that effort is Sam Aaron the guy behind Overtone, a Clojure dialect that overlays SuperCollider and turns it into an elegant live coding environment. The people ...


2

If you can train your musicians to play more quietly, they will use less air and be able to breath at the regular marks. Playing quietly requires correct embouchure. If you develop embouchure and play quietly, you will solve the breathing problem too. Matching the instrument to the child also helps - a child that is struggling with breathing on a trumpet ...


2

All children are extremely responsive to music; it's simply part of who we are. No special interest is required unless devoting yourself to one particular thing. As a music teacher for children I recommend singing first with simple percussion occasionally, because this helps your child internalise pitch, pulse and so on without struggling with the fine motor ...


2

I think a very safe answer is that interacting with your child is much more important than worrying about unknown risks linked to parental tone deafness. Give and take, have a conversation, sing, smile, dance to the beat of music, and don't hold back - add rich emotional dynamics with your face while you interact with your child. Make sure the musical ...


2

I would go ukulele first, personally. A friend of mine who is a music teacher of primary school children (same age as your daughter) has bought ukuleles for her whole class and swears by them; they all absolutely love them - it's a fun, not too serious instrument that they actively enjoy learning. They are easy to pick up and put down. You can easily take ...


2

I'd say those are boomwhackers... My piano teacher teaches elementary school music (too) and loves those things. product website here: http://boomwhackers.com/ (that I have no affiliation with you moderators)


1

Buy 2 ukeleles, one for you and one for daughter. Then you can have fun together. A few years ago I had to learn to play ukelele to teach a girl, with learning dificulties, having trouble with guitar.I now play it regularly and 2 of my friends now play them as well as guitar. It is great for holidays as you can put it in your luggage. Having taught ...


1

People singing along to a tune when listening through headphones rarely comes out well. The problem is that the headphones mean the singer can't hear themselves - all they can hear is the music, and a muffled rumbling of their own voice through the bone structure in the head. Not much through the actual ear, so no tone to recognise as a note. This is true of ...



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