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11

I think you should start as if it is a game. Your child should be interested in this game, and its rules should be easy. There is nothing hard about creating a random sound with a harmonica, and at first it will be ok just to leave him to this. Once your son is more familiar with the instrument, you should start the main phase of the learning: Find the ...


7

I have to say that a household and environment that fosters a love of music will have a large impact on your daughters interest. Likely only piano lessons with an instructor will assess her interest in that particular instrument, but that's really just the tip of the iceberg. There are lots of other instruments, most just as fulfilling, as well as singing ...


6

There are hundreds of different types of breathing exercises, so I will mention a few and suggest important concepts to cover. 1.) Teach them how to visualize their breathing. This one is extremely important and is the root of good breathing. I always teach my students to think of taking big, large, open, relaxed, deep breaths. 2.) They should be silent. ...


5

I disliked piano (particularly lessons) until grade 11. Something just changed and now I love it. Some kids will enjoy it right away, but most of the time I hear stories like mine. I was a disciplined kid but most generally aren't, and practising is a drag. A lack of interest may not be a good indicator that you should stop the lessons -- so many people ...


4

I think it may not be the best vantage to try and "assess" the amount of interest. Look at it this way. Your child's interest in music is not set in stone. It's a living part of her, and if nurtured it can grow. A bad instructor can bunk her desire to ever touch the instrument. But your own interest and involvement in her lessons are primary. So don't ...


4

In my experience of leading amateur kids choirs, the comfortable range for most 4-8 year olds would be around middle C (or possibly as low as the B flat just below that) up to around D or E -- that is, just over an octave. Many kids would struggle with a low A or a high F, I think.


4

I bought my son a 3/4 scale guitar with nylon strings when he was 5 or 6. That gave him enough interest to start learning, then I let him use one of my cheap full scale acoustics with steel strings at age 8 as his hands were big enough. Currently he has taken up bass, so he is learning on a 5 string that my bass player had spare. It is a challenge as he is ...


2

Consider a ukulele. "Real" ukuleles are available cheaply (although you can spend a lot on a really lovely one). It suits small hands. It has nylon strings so it's not too difficult to fret. There are plenty of resources for learning real songs to play on the uke. Having fewer strings makes for easier chord shapes. It's a great instrument on which a child ...


2

I started playing guitar at about 7 years old, I got a classical guitar, slightly smaller than the common size -but very slightly (I think it was larger that the '3/4 size', I actually played until I was 20!). The important thing for a child, I'd say, is that the guitar is confortable to play: rather low action and normal-to-low tension strings. Nylon, of ...


2

At four years old free play is best, with age appropriate instruments. You can get some really cute little percussion instruments and whistles made for tiny hands, and you can make instruments with beans for shakers, etc. Formal learning and games can come later, at about six once his musical ability is more developed. I'd also suggest lots of singing of ...


2

I suggest to buy a digital piano and use it for composition. When drawing notes on a computer screen, you do not actually hear immediately the music you compose and can try less variants than just attempting to play directly. From that I tried, as little as telling "press every second white key, together or in a sequence" (so C, Dm, Em, etc) results ...


2

This isn't a great answer if you just want your kids to make music, but if you want to use music making as a vehicle to teach the kids how to program then I'd take a look at Sonic Pi. The founder of that effort is Sam Aaron the guy behind Overtone, a Clojure dialect that overlays SuperCollider and turns it into an elegant live coding environment. The people ...


2

If you can train your musicians to play more quietly, they will use less air and be able to breath at the regular marks. Playing quietly requires correct embouchure. If you develop embouchure and play quietly, you will solve the breathing problem too. Matching the instrument to the child also helps - a child that is struggling with breathing on a trumpet ...


2

All children are extremely responsive to music; it's simply part of who we are. No special interest is required unless devoting yourself to one particular thing. As a music teacher for children I recommend singing first with simple percussion occasionally, because this helps your child internalise pitch, pulse and so on without struggling with the fine motor ...


1

You can't assess your kids interest in music, that's something your kid will eventually be able to do on his own at some point in his life. My parents assumed I have no interest in music simply because I ran away/didn't attend the school choir. Which of course is complete bullshit, because I love music more than anything else really and would have easily ...


1

This is around the same age I started playing guitar. The guitar I started on was my dads first guitar which was from the early 60s, it was a catalog guitar nothing fancy. For strings, since I had an electric I had light gauge steel strings.. The way I got hooked was just by listening to the music my dad liked, which is the same music I like now and then.. I ...


1

I agree on quality. You wouldn't want to give a child a pre-war Martin unless you're crazy and rich or he's Chris Thile in the making, but you wouldn't want to give something that pretended to be an instrument, either. Smaller, but not too small, or else the child will rightfully think it's just a toy. Two crucial things to note: If the child is ...


1

I'm not (really) a guitar player, but I have taught beginners as part of a generalist music-lesson gig. The other answers so far are good, but I would add two essential things from my own experience: The fretboard needs to be in tune. Otherwise, the instrument is going to sound really bad. If you're not sure, tune any string with an electronic chromatic ...



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