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6

It's not arbitrary. American accents in choral singing (especially Southern) produce several disadvantages in tone, tuning and volume. Specifically, the American hard "r" forces the speaker/singer to close the jaw and lift the tongue, both of which reduce the air space within the mouth and the back of the throat, reducing resonance. The result when singing ...


6

It's common for a certain musical style to be associated with a certain accent. Adele ditches her Norf Laaaaaaandan accent for a distinctly American sound when she's belting out her latest soul-tinged ballad. Birmingham (UK)-born Ali Campbell of reggae act UB40 does a half-decent job of sounding like a Jamaican. On the flip side, punk singer Joey Ramone's ...


6

It's a bit old-fashioned, and reasons have to do with placement (our accent has a lot of nasalization of vowels) and airflow restriction (try saying "er" as you normally do, and then the way the Brits do it, and you'll see that you don't restrict the airway as much in the latter). However, while these reasons may be musical reasons, they are also pretty ...


2

If you're game to choral works there is a tremendous amount of repertoire available, including more classical based works and popular (i. e. folk) songs from all parts of the world arranged for choir. Try a google search specifying "choral" or "choir score", or let us know some more specific taste preferences for some more oriented guidance. Regarding pop ...



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