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11

You don't want to "push hard", that's more likely to result in injury than in more endurance. As soon as your muscles start to feel tired, you should take a break. Here are some tips on managing your endurance: Take care of your general health. Eat right, stay hydrated, get some cardiovascular excercise, and get plenty of sleep. Use proper technique. Make ...


6

There is no need to strengthen your R5 for this passage. It's not a question of force, but of control. This is a piano passage, so what you should so is reduce the energy in the three remaining notes. Then the highest note will automatically sound accented. But even if you did have to increase force on the highest note, you wouldn't do it with an isolated ...


4

If it helps, I can tell you that Ohlsson's statements don't mean a huge amount to someone with a full musical training and 50+ years of practical experience either! He's telling us something about his personal reaction to the two pieces. He feels (I think) that in one the "fireworks" are sufficient to maintain interest, in the less showy piece he has to ...


3

First of all, attempting that piece after 5 years of study is probably too early. I guess it's possible, depending on your study "regimen" for these 5 years, your age, and your natural talent, but to give you a reference, Chopin's Op.10 is in the Syllabus of the Associate Diploma (ARCT) in Piano Performance of UK's Royal Conservatory. I'm not fully familiar ...


3

I think it depends very much on whether you take the "old school" view that fingering a passage like this involves "passing the thumb under", or the more modern idea the that driving force comes from your hand and arm moving sideways, and not from your fingers. There is nothing "wrong" with either method. The difference is mainly in how you move and ...


3

This part sounds very familiar to me: (As an aside, I also suffer from forearm fatigue (left arm) when playing guitar when there are enough bar chords.) Fatigue (assuming we're no longer beginners) doesn't always occur because the muscles are weak; it can be caused by different sets of muscles opposing each other. (If so, strength exercises won't help.)...


2

You've given a clear hint in your question that it's more likely technique than raw strength. You say it happens very quickly (30 seconds). I bet that if you are playing at a comfortable, slow place, you can play for much, much longer, and play many more keystrokes overall. Instead focusing on building up strength, focus on relaxing your muscles when you ...


2

Keep in mind that you're looking for a melodic phrase with that second note, that imitates the melodic phrase in the first note in the earlier passage. So there are some deeper subtleties than just playing all the accented notes equally. You need to keep some form of primary accent on the first note, and a secondary one on the third note, as in any ...


2

The fingering also articulates the musical phrase better. By using the fourth finger on some of the octaves, the thumb naturally accents the first note of each four note group. It also helps distinguish the third and fourth sixteenth notes in the groups.


2

You should consider that whole six note passage, rather than just that one note/finger. Changing that 5 to 4 changes how the other surrounding notes lie on the hand, and requires changing those fingerings as well. Playing the six note group E-D#-F#-C# B#-D#, try first with the fingering as written in your excerpt, and then with 1241 24. For most hands and ...


2

I'll take a guess: did you learn your "technique" by using Hanon every day, then Czerny? Or did you start by assuming it was "obvious" that you play the piano by pressing the keys with your fingers? That will only get you so far, and pieces like the Chopin etudes will stay out of reach till you back-track and learn a better way. If your shoulders were aching,...


2

Playing the 1 op 10 after 5 years is a little "ambitious" should we say :-) That being said: that etude has caused tendinitis to many piano players so be on the watch for that: never let the increased speed cause you to tense up your forearm. Not to mention that relaxing will be key to keep your performance accurate. accuracy is tough on that etude as ...


2

This was intended to be a comment, but since I don't have enough reputation I must write it down here. Joseem gave you very good advices, but I wanted to add a few things. No one requests you to play at 170 bpm. There's no point in trying to play like Cziffra and other professionals. If you can play it consistently at 130 bpm and cannot go any higher, ...


1

It seems user314159 got it right in his comment where he said there is no consensus, and to prove it here's yet another approach by the composer and piano pedagogue Louis Kholer, where he, interestingly enough, specifies the finger for the f# in the second (an octave below) passage, but not in the first passage. The two phrases are almost identical and ...


1

Barring any physical/medical issues, you should simply relax. It's the hardest thing to do, but will yield the most benefits. Agility, speed, power, and longevity all require relaxation more than any amount of physical strength or finger dexterity. Your spine should be your tree trunk, and try to feel the weight of your forearm at the tips of your fingers as ...


1

Note: Internet advice on piano fingering is always suspect, since it comes from random people all over the world, who probably have completely different physiognomy, experience and attitudes than you do. That said, these left hand figures are clearly intended to be played with one position per group, even though they span more notes than the average hand. I ...


1

I see several parameters that could explain what you hear in these recordings and why you can't reproduce it: You don't have the same piano. A high quality and perfectly tuned piano tends to avoid the "soup of sounds" effect due to the pedal, and allows you to have nice pianissimi with the low notes, which is important in nocturnes (this requires a bit of ...



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