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10

You don't want to "push hard", that's more likely to result in injury than in more endurance. As soon as your muscles start to feel tired, you should take a break. Here are some tips on managing your endurance: Take care of your general health. Eat right, stay hydrated, get some cardiovascular excercise, and get plenty of sleep. Use proper technique. Make ...


6

There is no need to strengthen your R5 for this passage. It's not a question of force, but of control. This is a piano passage, so what you should so is reduce the energy in the three remaining notes. Then the highest note will automatically sound accented. But even if you did have to increase force on the highest note, you wouldn't do it with an isolated ...


5

A curved line connected two notes that are the same pitch is a tie. If they are different pitches, it is a slur. In this example, the C sharps in the bottom voices in the right hand are tied, and the other voices are played legato according to the slurs.


4

Your doesn't show the important fact that the trills start on the upper note. See the Peters edition here, for example. http://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ReverseLookup/102120 The fingering in your edition is good, but it's not obvious what it means (and @MattPutnam guessed wrong about contrary motion). Play the lower trill with your thumb under the second ...


4

If you can play this study beautifully, using your own fingering, any fingering, that should be good enough. But where it fits the hand, why not use 4? I'm looking at the Cortot edition (highly recommended; his fingering in particular is generally very very good), and in the very first bar the first pair of octaves is marked 5-5, the second 5-4. All of these ...


4

If it helps, I can tell you that Ohlsson's statements don't mean a huge amount to someone with a full musical training and 50+ years of practical experience either! He's telling us something about his personal reaction to the two pieces. He feels (I think) that in one the "fireworks" are sufficient to maintain interest, in the less showy piece he has to ...


3

This part sounds very familiar to me: (As an aside, I also suffer from forearm fatigue (left arm) when playing guitar when there are enough bar chords.) Fatigue (assuming we're no longer beginners) doesn't always occur because the muscles are weak; it can be caused by different sets of muscles opposing each other. (If so, strength exercises won't ...


3

The main point of alternating fingers in octave passages is not to enable legato playing. It won't produce a good legato anyway, since the thumb always has to jump/slide (although for psycho-acoustic reaons, half a legato can produce a nice illusion of the real thing). The real reason has to do with finger and hand positions. Judicious choice of the finger ...


2

Don't think of it as two simultaneous trills, think of it as a coordinated single trill or tremolo. Also, I'm not familiar with this piece, but the fingering would seem to indicate that the trills move in contrary motion (which I'm finding to be immensely easier as I test it out by tapping on my desk). Finally, I would note that barcarolles are very lazy ...


2

The fingering also articulates the musical phrase better. By using the fourth finger on some of the octaves, the thumb naturally accents the first note of each four note group. It also helps distinguish the third and fourth sixteenth notes in the groups.


2

Keep in mind that you're looking for a melodic phrase with that second note, that imitates the melodic phrase in the first note in the earlier passage. So there are some deeper subtleties than just playing all the accented notes equally. You need to keep some form of primary accent on the first note, and a secondary one on the third note, as in any ...


2

You've given a clear hint in your question that it's more likely technique than raw strength. You say it happens very quickly (30 seconds). I bet that if you are playing at a comfortable, slow place, you can play for much, much longer, and play many more keystrokes overall. Instead focusing on building up strength, focus on relaxing your muscles when you ...


2

I'll take a guess: did you learn your "technique" by using Hanon every day, then Czerny? Or did you start by assuming it was "obvious" that you play the piano by pressing the keys with your fingers? That will only get you so far, and pieces like the Chopin etudes will stay out of reach till you back-track and learn a better way. If your shoulders were ...


1

Barring any physical/medical issues, you should simply relax. It's the hardest thing to do, but will yield the most benefits. Agility, speed, power, and longevity all require relaxation more than any amount of physical strength or finger dexterity. Your spine should be your tree trunk, and try to feel the weight of your forearm at the tips of your fingers as ...


1

Note: Internet advice on piano fingering is always suspect, since it comes from random people all over the world, who probably have completely different physiognomy, experience and attitudes than you do. That said, these left hand figures are clearly intended to be played with one position per group, even though they span more notes than the average hand. I ...


1

First, I agree with alephzero about the fingering. The fingering in your edition assumes that you start on the upper auxiliary rather than the lower, and as I have detailed in my note to his answer this is not set in blood. If you like the lower auxilary, then reverse the numbers in the fingerings. 4-2 on the lower notes and 5-1 on the uppers, changing to ...


1

I see several parameters that could explain what you hear in these recordings and why you can't reproduce it: You don't have the same piano. A high quality and perfectly tuned piano tends to avoid the "soup of sounds" effect due to the pedal, and allows you to have nice pianissimi with the low notes, which is important in nocturnes (this requires a bit of ...


1

In keeping with the melodic and rhythmic elements Chopin is working with, his intention is to flatten the sixth degree of Eb (key) - i.e., the C. This happens to be the enharmonic equivalent of B. Regardless, his intentions lead him to write Cb. This is an idiosyncratic feature of the key of Eb. Flattening the sixth of other major scales does not lead to ...


1

I haven't checked the sheet music, but in any case, a Cb is enharmonically the same as a B natural. As is always the case, the flat just lowers the note by a semi-tone.



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