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2

Playing the 1 op 10 after 5 years is a little "ambitious" should we say :-) That being said: that etude has caused tendinitis to many piano players so be on the watch for that: never let the increased speed cause you to tense up your forearm. Not to mention that relaxing will be key to keep your performance accurate. accuracy is tough on that etude as ...


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This was intended to be a comment, but since I don't have enough reputation I must write it down here. Joseem gave you very good advices, but I wanted to add a few things. No one requests you to play at 170 bpm. There's no point in trying to play like Cziffra and other professionals. If you can play it consistently at 130 bpm and cannot go any higher, ...


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I can play it consistently at 130, but every time I try to go higher, I stumble and play very badly. Don't forget the remark attributed to Einstein: "Insanity is endlessly repeating the same procedure, but hoping for a different result". If you are "stuck" at a particular tempo, and you have been playing for (only) 5 years, most likely your technique ...


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First of all, attempting that piece after 5 years of study is probably too early. I guess it's possible, depending on your study "regimen" for these 5 years, your age, and your natural talent, but to give you a reference, Chopin's Op.10 is in the Syllabus of the Associate Diploma (ARCT) in Piano Performance of UK's Royal Conservatory. I'm not fully familiar ...


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It seems user314159 got it right in his comment where he said there is no consensus, and to prove it here's yet another approach by the composer and piano pedagogue Louis Kholer, where he, interestingly enough, specifies the finger for the f# in the second (an octave below) passage, but not in the first passage. The two phrases are almost identical and ...


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I think it depends very much on whether you take the "old school" view that fingering a passage like this involves "passing the thumb under", or the more modern idea the that driving force comes from your hand and arm moving sideways, and not from your fingers. There is nothing "wrong" with either method. The difference is mainly in how you move and ...


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You should consider that whole six note passage, rather than just that one note/finger. Changing that 5 to 4 changes how the other surrounding notes lie on the hand, and requires changing those fingerings as well. Playing the six note group E-D#-F#-C# B#-D#, try first with the fingering as written in your excerpt, and then with 1241 24. For most hands and ...



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