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10

Wikipedia says "a 6th". It doesn't say what kind of 6th. An interval from any "flavor" (my word) of an E (such as Eb, E, or E#) up to any flavor of C (Cb, C, C#) is a sixth, because E-F-G-A-B-C is six notes. But the kind of 6th---major, minor, augmented, diminished, double augmented, double diminished, etc.---depends on the respective flavors of the E and ...


9

Just to expand on Pat's answer, there is a figured bass symbols for all type of inversion including root position. The picture above shows the complete figured bass symbol and how it will be denoted in analysis. As you can see root position triads and 7th chords have their own complete figured bass symbols, but reduce drastically because how common they ...


5

They are figured bass numbers, as used under bass lines in (primarily) the Baroque era to indicate harmonic content to be improvised by continuo players such as the harpsichordist. The numbers refer to the diatonic intervals above the bass. Look at your 6/4 example above. The two distinct notes above the bass note are a sixth and a 4th above, hence 6/4. This ...


3

When you play E-G-A-C, it can be called a variety of names: C6 / E (C6 over E) Am7 / E (Am7 over E) You would use the above in a chart if you need a specific bass note, typically for an ascending / descending bass movement. Otherwise, they are just generally called C6 or Am7, and you may want to specify that it is C6 1st inversion or Am7 2nd inversion. ...


3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music) An interval is simply the count of notes from one to another. So a sixth just means that, including the root, you've counted up six notes in that scale. It's not the count which determines the sharp/natural/flat-ness of the note. The scale determines that. If the scale contains C, then it will always be C, ...


3

The earliest version I can think of is Bach's Musikalisches Opfer which is a series of canons Bach composed after given a theme by the King. The music can be played forwards and backwards simultaneously harmoniously in various ways (refer to the video). I also remember reading a score of Mozart's violin duet piece called "The Mirror". To play this piece ...


2

Ear Training Ear training is a facility that you can develop over time. There are textbooks, tutorials, and even many pieces of computer software that provide courses in ear training. The basic method is to start with exercises that teach you to recognize simple intervals between two notes played at the same time, and then build up to chords from there, ...


2

As @Menglan pointed out, the crab canon from Bach's musical offering is probably the most famous example. I transcribed it and put it on musecore: http://musescore.com/rpbouman/scores/143009 The art of fuge (Also Bach) has 2 fugues which can be inverted. Look for Contrapunctus XII and XIII (there's a rectus and an inversus version for both of them) I ...


2

The roman numerals indicate which chord we are using in the scale. If the Roman numerals are written with capital letters then they indicate a Major Chord. If they are written in lower case letters then they indicate a minor chord. A Major chord has a major third and a perfect fifth. A minor chord has a minor third and a Perfect fifth. I(i) - Tonic II(ii) ...


1

To help you understand where we get the numbers from take the tonic of C for instance. If you would write it on paper it would be C then above it E and then G. Inversions always care about what note is on the bottom. Composers can change the notes above the bottom note as need be without changing the inversion. If count from C to E you get three (C being ...



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