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29

The root note is always the note that is the basis for the chord, regardless of its inversion. In root position the lowest note is the root (hence the name), but other notes are the lowest in other inversions of the chord. For example, take a C Major chord. In every position, the root note is C. Whether it is voiced as C-E-G (root position), E-G-C (first ...


16

Just to expand on Pat's answer, there is a figured bass symbols for all type of inversion including root position. The picture above shows the complete figured bass symbol and how it will be denoted in analysis. As you can see root position triads and 7th chords have their own complete figured bass symbols, but reduce drastically because how common they ...


12

Wikipedia says "a 6th". It doesn't say what kind of 6th. An interval from any "flavor" (my word) of an E (such as Eb, E, or E#) up to any flavor of C (Cb, C, C#) is a sixth, because E-F-G-A-B-C is six notes. But the kind of 6th---major, minor, augmented, diminished, double augmented, double diminished, etc.---depends on the respective flavors of the E and ...


10

A chord is typically defined by intervals of thirds, minor or major. Intervals are the distance between two notes - if a note is three half steps apart, it is a minor third. If it is four, it is a major. Here is a little visual representation of intervals on a piano in the key of C. Not sure what those numbers on the right are... A typical chord is ...


10

It might also help if you figure out the FUNCTION of the chords. I can't easily tell what chord is what without realizing its function. For example, the most common cadence is V-I. If you're in the key of F major, V is C and I is F. If you have a chord that looks C-ish going to a chord that looks F-ish, that might be your answer! Also, use your ear -- ...


10

As a bass player, I am typically trying to either play something unexpected/less than intuitive, or really awesome. Only when I am asked to fulfill a role in a band with a traditional approach to the bass part do I consistently end up relying on standard sorts of lines or the expected notes (there are definitely times where it sounds better to just chug on ...


10

You need to understand the difference between close and open voicings. In close voicings the notes are arranged in thirds or seconds. Inversions of close voicings are created by moving the lowest note up by one octave. So the close voicings of C7 are C E G Bb (root position) E G Bb C (first inversion) G Bb C E (second inversion) Bb C E G (third inversion)...


8

They are figured bass numbers, as used under bass lines in (primarily) the Baroque era to indicate harmonic content to be improvised by continuo players such as the harpsichordist. The numbers refer to the diatonic intervals above the bass. Look at your 6/4 example above. The two distinct notes above the bass note are a sixth and a 4th above, hence 6/4. This ...


7

I think the confusion comes when ideas are lumped together. From a harmonic perspective, the bass note determines what is the inversion of the chord and given C in the bass and E-G-C the chord is a C in root position. That being said however, from a pianist perspective, the closed form in the upper voices is a C chord in first inversion. When grabbing ...


6

The earliest version I can think of is Bach's Musikalisches Opfer which is a series of canons Bach composed after given a theme by the King. The music can be played forwards and backwards simultaneously harmoniously in various ways (refer to the video). I also remember reading a score of Mozart's violin duet piece called "The Mirror". To play this piece ...


6

I'm going to disagree with Tim (he removed his answer, in case you are wondering what I am referring to). I think it is safe to assume this is an F dominant seventh (f-a-c-e♭). (I don't know the names for chords with sevenths in English.) To determine which inversion a chord is, one should always look at the lowest note, so here it would be first inversion. ...


6

It is not considered a different chord. The name is still the same, the notes are still the same, they are just in a different order - so they are effectively a different voicing. They will sound different, which is why inversions are used - you can impart a number of different flavours of sound to a piece of music.


6

The thing you need to learn is what notes are in a chord. It doesn't matter how they are placed in a chord; it still is the same. The basic chords are built on thirds. So, take the notes you have and try to put them in order of thirds. We need a Root, a third (major or minor) and a fifth. The fist chord you have is: G-E(bass clef) C-G (treble clef). The ...


6

If I'm understanding the terms you are using correctly, I think the notation you are looking for is "G#/H#" in Croatian, or "G#/B#" in English. In classical chord symbols, inversions are indicated with the actual intervals present (that are not 3rds) after the chord name. So a G# major chord with B# on the bottom would be called a G#6 chord (Not to be ...


5

It's not a different chord, and in terms of guitar I wouldn't even think of it as a different voicing. It's an inversion! That's what the term is for, to describe taking a particular chord structure and changing the order of notes so that a different note is on the bottom. Guitar voicings tend to have specific structures, like closed triad, spread triad, ...


5

One way to think of chords is you're playing a few selected notes from a chord that stretches from sub-bass to ultra-sonic. So the full C major chord contains all the Cs, all the Es and all the Gs. With enough pairs of hands, you could play 8 octaves' worth of this chord on a piano. This is a C major chord, and C is the root note. All of the Cs are root ...


5

The problem is that this is not a common notation, and the meaning of the symbol "C/Em" is unclear. What Lilypond can do - as you know - is add a letter after a slash, e.g. C/E, which means that you're supposed to play a C major triad with the note E in the bass. What does exist are polychords where two different chords are stacked on top of each other. ...


5

It's just basic figured bass which on the V chord in a major key would look like: Root position: V7 First inversion: V65 Second inversion: V43 Third inversion: V42 The above is attached to a Roman Numeral for demonstrations, but would be omitted if you were just doing the figured bass. Figured bass is always built off the key so all the notes used above ...


5

Generally, the only note whose position in the chord matters is the bass note. It's the note that determines if the chord is in root position or in some inversion. After that, the other notes (in our case C,G and Bb) can be in any order you want and the result will be the same. The different ways you put these notes are called 'voicings' and it's good to ...


4

The roman numerals indicate which chord we are using in the scale. If the Roman numerals are written with capital letters then they indicate a Major Chord. If they are written in lower case letters then they indicate a minor chord. A Major chord has a major third and a perfect fifth. A minor chord has a minor third and a Perfect fifth. I(i) - Tonic II(ii) ...


4

As @Menglan pointed out, the crab canon from Bach's musical offering is probably the most famous example. I transcribed it and put it on musecore: http://musescore.com/rpbouman/scores/143009 The art of fuge (Also Bach) has 2 fugues which can be inverted. Look for Contrapunctus XII and XIII (there's a rectus and an inversus version for both of them) I ...


4

I would be careful of how you use the word timbre, which refers to the quality of the sound. There are several embedded questions here, and I will try to address them. Most doubling rules apply to voice-leading, and the treatment of the bass is integral into creating a satisfactory and refined sound. Instead of "accent" I would use the word "emphasize" ...


4

Chord inversion simply refers to which note is in the bass (i.e., the lowest note). We start in root position with the root in the bass: for a C major chord, C is the lowest note. If we imagine a simple C-E-G triad, then we can "invert" the chord by moving the C up an octave, getting E-G-C, with E (the third) in the bass. This is first inversion. We do ...


4

Adding to Wheat's excellent answer, the note after the slash is indeed the bass note, put there to create an inversion of the prevailing chord, but mainly to make a bass line under the song. As such, if there is only a guitar (or maybe piano) playing, it makes sense for that instrument to play the inversion of the chord indicated. However, once the bassist ...


4

The "first" part of the first inversion means the first note that is not the root (aka the third) is the bass note so in this case, all first inversion is telling you is that the E is in the bass instead of the C. The order of what notes come next is not really important. A more in depth explination about seventh chord inversions can be found here. In ...


4

Inversion is determined solely by the lowest note. The rest is voicing - close position or extended position. Guitarists have a limited choice of voicings, defined by the possible "shapes" their fingers can reach. Sometimes if they can get the right note on the bottom and the right one in the melody, that has to be considered a result! Keyboardists have ...


3

You have the notes B, G#, E#, C#. Chords are built in 3rds so you need to arrange the chords until the are in 3rds. Thirds in general are when you skip a letter name. So all the possible thirds are A - C - E - G - B - D - F - A. Only the letter name matters not the quality i.e. if it is flat, sharp or natural. In this case you would rearrange them to C#, ...



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