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It's a G6 chord: 3 x 2 4 3 x (from low E to high e, counted from the capo); due to the capo it sounds like an Ab6 chord. If you like you could just replace it by a standard G chord.


1

I think it will help you more to look at the chords in closed position to get an understanding of how the chord itself,G7, is built and what the inversions are and why. The picture above is equivalent in nature to the one in your example, but for simplicity the chords are in closed position. Now let's look at the leftmost chord which is G7 in root ...


1

The book didn't make a mistake. Think of the root inversion as the zeroth inversion - or as I prefer not an inversion at all. Then the chord in measure 2 is the first inversion, measure 3 is the 2nd inversion and measure 4 is the 3rd inversion.



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