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Your confusion lies in the fact that you believe that the 1st inversion of the close voicing will result in a 1st inversion drop-2 voicing when the second note from the top is dropped one octave. This is not the case. As already pointed out by Tim, the lowest note in the voicing determines the inversion, regardless of the sequence of the other notes. It ...


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An inversion is called with regard to the lowest note. Thus 1st inv. would have Ab as its lowest note. On piano, it's very easy to follow on with the rest of the notes going up sequentially, but, due to the tuning of the guitar, it's often not possible to keep the order. So, as long as the other three notes are present, their order is said not to be ...


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In popular music, the most common chord positions are the root and the second inversion. First-inversion chords tend to sound rhythmically "weak". In any case, doubling the third of a major chord between the bass and treble is probably not a good idea, unless you really want that sound for some reason. Try it, and some alternatives, and use your ears! If ...


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Write your bass line. Then fit harmony notes in as they will. It's quite unlikely that both melody and bass will take the third of a major chord. It's also unlikely that block chords in the piano left hand will sound good. They tend to sound muddy.


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For chords at the end of the piece (or really important sectional endings) a root position chord is often best. Other places, the choice of root or first inversion should be (at least in my opinion) which one makes the bass line sound best (in the composer's opinion.) Usually (at least in chorale style with 3 or 4 voices) one prefers not to double thirds of ...


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I'd recommend taking a step-by-step approach: Figure out what the notes are. You can't know what chord it is without knowing what notes there are. From top to bottom, the notes are: G♯, E, C♯ (twice) Figure out what chord it is. You can't know what the chord inversion is without knowing what chord it is. There's only one way to arrange the ...


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An inversion is just determined by what note of the chord is in the bass. Root position has the root in the bass, first inversion has the third in the bass, second has the fifth in the bass, and third has the 7th in the bass. Once you know what chord you are looking at, you know what the root, third, and fifth is. I'm not going to give you the answer to ...


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In common practice four part harmony the bass note dictates the inversion. So, first identify the chord by the notes that make it: C#-E-G# --> that's C# min, or iii in A Maj. So C# is the root of this chord, and it's in the bass, so it's a root chord. If E was in the bass, it would be 1st inversion (C#6); if G# was in the bass it would be 2nd inversion ...



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