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1

If you're going to call it C6, it's because it's in a sequence where C is more predominant than A, for instance, in a sequence C, C6, Cma7, C6. If it was preceded by the dom.5 of A,(E), it would then take the mantle of Am7. If it was, say, C6, 1st inversion, thus, in isolation, could be either, then the chords either side would dictate technically what it's ...


3

Context is always important when naming chords as many chords can be named multiple ways. When given a choice between a chord like Am7/C or C6 the default is to call it a C6 for a good reason because have the bass note be perceived as the root is very typical rather than assume the chord is in first inversion. In almost every case those two chords serve ...


3

I agree with @MattPutnam's answer as far as chord inversions and close/open voicings are concerned, but I'd like to add an explanation of what drop voicings are. First of all, there are no "drop 2 chords", there are only drop 2 voicings of chords. The concept of drop voicings is often applied to four part chords. A drop voicing is obtained by dropping one ...


2

Listen to, oh, I dunno...Paul McCartney. He's ALL OVER THE PLACE in terms of busy lines. And his stuff works great. One of the issues with catching tension notes in the bass is the concept of "low interval limits." What happens when you violate low interval limits, is that the interval that you're playing ceases to sound like that interval, instead ...


4

Chord inversion simply refers to which note is in the bass (i.e., the lowest note). We start in root position with the root in the bass: for a C major chord, C is the lowest note. If we imagine a simple C-E-G triad, then we can "invert" the chord by moving the C up an octave, getting E-G-C, with E (the third) in the bass. This is first inversion. We do ...



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