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1

Well- all the answers to date contain factual information. But none tell the whole story and might over complicate the matter. The least you need to know is that the chord used as the basis for your question (D/A) is known in guitar chord notation parlance as a "slash chord". In simple terms, when a slash chord is used in guitar "notation" the author ...


0

Directly addressing the exact chord: There are some, myself included that always play D/A when they see the D chord. Technically, a true root position D chord has D as the lowest note. Guitarists are limited somewhat in their voicings, and often play a non-root note in the bass for a chord that might not have the bass note indicated. A root position D chord ...


4

Adding to Wheat's excellent answer, the note after the slash is indeed the bass note, put there to create an inversion of the prevailing chord, but mainly to make a bass line under the song. As such, if there is only a guitar (or maybe piano) playing, it makes sense for that instrument to play the inversion of the chord indicated. However, once the bassist ...


4

The notation D/A refers to a D major chord with the note A in the bass. This is an example of a major chord in second inversion. The letter after the slash indicates a specific note, not the name of a chord, so your idea of "D/Am" would make no sense. Any triadic chord can be played with the root in the bass, the third in the bass, or the fifth in the bass. ...



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