Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

52

There are formulas and sets of harmony formulas that musicians know of. ie. Chord Formation. I, IV, V7 sets of harmony; Chord Substitution; Fifth Motion, Dominant motion; Diatonic Cycles of Fifths, Chord Tone Substitutions, etc. Each chords in each set have their own characteristics that you need to know what they represent. I can be indicative of what each ...


51

There are a ton of easy and great-sounding substitutions, and you can use them in the turnaround or anywhere else you want. Here are a few of the most common: ii-V sub: Substitute ii for IV, so that you have a ii-V turnaround. For example, if you're playing in the key of C, the V chord is G7 and the ii chord is Dm7. So instead of C-F-G7, play C-Dm7-G7. ...


21

There are three possibilities: The musicians are "faking it" based on their knowledge of theory. This notion may be romantic but in my experience it is rather unlikely. There's simply too much that could go wrong. This isn't a jam session or a concert, it's a TV performance to showcase a singer. That said, in other situations they might be perfectly ...


19

There are, of course, an enormous variety of chord progressions used in jazz. That said, here are three you should know: 12-bar Blues The basic 12-bar blues as played in jazz (not as played in blues) usually goes something like: I-IV-I-I-IV-IV-I-vi-ii-V-I-turnaround In blues, all these chords would be dominant sevenths. Jazz players, however, ...


19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


16

The ♭III is a borrowed chord from the parallel minor. A bit more info: The bIII is commonly followed by the IV, giving it something of a subdominant function relative to the IV. The ii here is acting as a IV (it's the relative minor of IV) in a plagal cadence, so functionally what we have is more similar to I bIII IV, a common rock progression. Also, the ...


16

Here are quite a few standard substitutions take from page 36 of the free PDF you can download here: http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


15

Why? It sounds good. Music would sound boring after a while if all you played were the notes in the scale. I would be hard-pressed to find music that doesn't have notes outside of the scale--scales are just the basis for melodies, and the home base from which you can stray in creative ways. In this particular context (and your chords would be better ...


15

Tension and release. The point of a leading note is often to give a feeling that it needs to move, as little as possible, to the tonic. As in G chord, dominant of C, contains B, which needs to move to the tonic C. A semitone move is used in this example. The F minor chord has F, Ab and C. To move as little as possible to the tonic involves the Ab going to G, ...


14

Fm/Ab stands for F minor with note Ab on bass. Generically, X/Y is Chord X with note Y as lowest note. This second chord could be read as Gb major with major seventh and added 9th. The slash after a chord alteration serves only as a separator to indicate every simultaneous alteration you should apply to the chord.


13

The short answer is - because they can hear how the song goes, and they know how to translate those pitches into a chord progression on their instrument that quickly. Because they went to music school or because they have many years of experience or both. It's not faked or rigged or a trick. While it does look like magic, it is a surprisingly common skill ...


13

Before you replace chords with 3 or 4 notes with those with 5 or 6 notes (or even more), re-harmonize a melody by applying these 2 complementary strategies recursively (i.e. each is applicable to the result of applying them, so you can do it in many passes) to chord changes: 1) replace one chord with two (duration of 2 chords in new version = duration of ...


13

Well, the I-IV thing is in a sense problem-complete of the question. It shows the relationship of the chords to the tonal center (the key). So we have to do some harmonic analysis just to do this translation. I'll do House of the Rising Sun because that's the one I know. The Am is the root chord i (but the proof is really in the second and fourth lines of ...


13

There seems to be a general confusion here. Everything you can play or imagine is possible. Theory is a means to describe music, but music is by no way bound to any theory whatsoever. Major scales are typically not a good way to describe (or play) Blues. Better suited are scales that are aptly named "blues scales" (see ...


12

Assuming they don't already know the specific song (it's quite likely they do), it's possible it's a contrafact: a song based on the chord progression of a jazz standard; e.g. 12-bar blues or rhythm changes. Or a pop song using a common progression with just 3 or 4 chords; e.g. I I IV V or I V IV V or I IV vi V or I iii IV V, etc


12

Yes, there is a very good explanation. The III chord can be much better expressed as a secondary dominant. Basically, III happens to be the V of vi. A secondary dominant is using a non-diatonic chord (in other words, a chord that does not naturally belong in the scale, containing an accidental, like the G#) to provide a means to change key or shift to ...


12

F#m7b5 -> B7 -> Em7 is ii-V-I minor progression in key of E-minor then Em7 -> A7 can be thought as ii-V7 in Dmajor or Em7 -> A7 -> Dm7 as D minor ii-V7-I Dm7 -> G7 -> Cmaj7 is normal ii-V7-I in key of C major then Cm7 shifts key to C minor and begins chromatic root movement downwards with Cm7 -> Bm7 -> Bdim7 -> Am7 -> Ab7 last four chords is ...


11

Start out by learning the characteristic sound of a V-I progression. Play only the guide tones (3rd and 7th) and note how the 7th of the V moves down a half step to become the 3rd of the I. Then do the same for the ii-V, noticing how the 7th of the ii moves down a half step to become the 3rd of the V. Then put them together. There are many possible ...


11

That is a very complex question. If you are just looking for simplicity, you could follow some fairly straight-forward guidelines though. Choose some "candidate" chords. I would think I, ii (minor), iii (minor), IV, V, and vi (minor) are all very good candidates for a nice sounding progression. vii° could be a used very sparingly (it would be a ...


11

Be careful with the Maj 7 on I chords (ie DMaj7), which will quite often conflict with the root (D) played in the melody : you tend to get a b9 interval between the 7th (left hand) and the root (right hand) with sounds very bad. In that case, substitute DM7 with D6 which will sound smoother. The IVM chord (GM in our case) can often be replaced with a IIm7 ...


11

The chord progressions you want will depend on the sound you're after. You can do quite a lot of creative songwriting without ever straying from the basic "in-key" chords: I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-[vii], and if the Top 40 charts are any indication, you can make a pantload of money with very "safe" chord progressions. However, if you don't want to be safe, and want ...


11

I would analyze it as follows: Em D is indeed E minor. Since you go from D back to Em, it has a "modal" feel - Aeolian or Dorian. In a diatonic E minor scale, I'd expect to see a d# somewhere. (Not saying that you should, it sounds fine) C G Still in e minor. As you repeat it more often, it might start to sound like G major (the relative major of E ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


10

Both progressions contain two subsequent major chords, the first one one whole step below the second. That step is classically reserved for IV - V, as in the cadence I - IV - V - I; and classically, it's among the most "mandatory" things that after this V there be a I. But in both examples that's not what happens! In Karazhan, Bb - C would in fact be the IV ...


10

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


10

This chord progression is extremely common in a lot of rock, pop and R&B music and is usually called bVI–bVII–I (where the b's are flat signs). In other words, the A major triad is generally taken as defining A major as the overriding key, but the preceding chords are taken to be major triads built on the lowered sixth and seventh scale degrees. Bob ...


9

TV-show bands research the music of guest artists beforehand, including the keys in which they work. They do this for a few reasons, not the least of which is the off chance that there is an improvized request for a tune. But on the whole everything is staged including what looks to be a spontaneous jam. The best perfomer in the world will sound bad with bad ...


9

Here are some (partly overlapping) suggestions on how you can vary the sound of a iii-vi-ii-V-I progression: Use different additional chord tones (sevenths, extensions, and alterations) for your chords such as flat and augmented 5ths, 6ths, (major and minor) 7ths, (sharp, flat, and regular) 9ths, (sharp and regular) 11ths, (flat or regular) 13ths, and also ...


9

The chord progression for the introduction is: Am - C+ - C - D7 - F - Fm - C However, you can see it as Am - C - F - C (or vi - I - IV - I), and the chords in the middle are only chromatic passing notes, i.e. • In the sequence Am - C you have (A,C,E) that goes to (C,E,G). E and C are common to both chords and A and G are one tone apart. Add a chromatic ...


8

I would recommend that first of all, you define 'happy', because it means many different things to different people. Here's an exercise I'd use to find out what to do in your own music Find examples of the mood you're trying to set. Write down as much as you can about the tempo, the instrumentation, possibly the scales and types of chords used(from sheet ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible