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There are some common ones that will crop up again and again in almost all pop genres and I hear these in house quite a lot: (these are in Am or C for simplicity) C | G | Am | F Am | F | C | G C | G | Em | F F | G | Am | Am Am | C | Em | D By examination you can see the general theme is using C, Am, and F. 1, 3, 6 or 1, 4, 6 in the case of C progressions. ...


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Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...


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That's just for root movement. So, measures 7 ad 8 are: C6 Am7 Dm7 G7 The Am7 leads to the Dm7 much more naturally that C6 -> Dm7 would. Also, right before the C6 in measure 7 is a G7 so that resolving to C6 instead of Am7 makes a lot of sense as well. Remember, the strongest root movement in western music is V -> I. A good first place to start ...


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Assuming by /C it means a D13#11/C, play D, F#, (A), C, B and G# between the hands, with D as the root, and then drop the left hand lowest note to the C just below.Leave out the A if you want, and put the C and B in the first chord as far apart as you can. It doesn't have to be so in the slash chord, as the lowest note is C. Play around with the voicing till ...


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The bass part probably changes, maybe from a C to an A. I agree, the difference is subtle, and hardly worthwhile, especially if the rest of the chord voicing is static.A copy of the sample would give a better clue.


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You give us neither the G7 > C or E7 > Am cadences that would answer your question conclusively. Which way will you choose to end the piece of which this is an excerpt? Neither you or you friend is wrong, or right!


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This is very general question, and the "right" answer depends very much on what sort of music you want to create. But here two simple "rules" to get you started, without stifling your imagination too much (because "use your imagination" beats all other rules - the final definition of "right" is always "that's what I wanted it to sound like"). Choose one ...


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To get started with simple chord progressions you can download some charts and graphs on line that will be very helpful. There are no rules in music but if you stick to the most common progressions found in most popular music, you will be safe. For example, in a major key for a three chord song, a common progression would be I - IV - V. Another might be I ...


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I'm new to this community, but maybe I can be helpful. You say that you have some basic music theory down, and that is great. Are you aware of the concept of an interval ? It basically means the distance between two given notes. So, for example, an C to D is a whole step (2 semitones), which is the same interval as a G to A (same distance). It can help to ...



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