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1

You can write a circle of 5th's progression in the Phyrgian mode, but it won't make the progression sound Phyrgian. This site shows you how to build a circle of 5th's progression in any key in any mode, but doesn't really explain what is going on. If you look at the progression for C Phygian you will see: Db - Ab - Eb - Bbm - Fm - Cm - Gdim However, if ...


0

Lets have a review about what exactly those Roman Numerals mean. They Indicate the scale degree on which the chord is build and also what sort of chord we have to do with and also the inversion. The Four Main chord types you will have to do with in your harmony work is... Major (Major Third / Perfect Fifth) minor (Minor Third / Perfect Fifth) Augmented ...


3

Chord progressions are nice, and a lot of good songs have been made using them, but to move on to more complex patterns (or make your own progressions) you really need to learn the personalities of the different chords as well as some common transitions between chords. I'll try my best to explain it, but it is really hard ... especially on a forum. I'll ...


2

The progression F - Fm - C/G is a technique used in many songs. The F is the IV of C. The walk down is in the third of the F chord (A) to F Minor (Ab) then to the C Major (G), there is a G bass note over the C chord. So their is a chromatic movement of A-Ab-G in the harmony. 'Wake Me Up When September Ends' uses this over the hook in the song. It is used ...


3

The answer is in fact "C#/G#" (a C# with a G# as the bass note). That chord can be played as an A shaped barre chord on the 4th fret (446664). But playing the progression - Am, C, E, Am, G, F, Fm, C/G a semitone higher will mean having to play all barre chords instead of the open Am, E, and G and C/G. Not sure why you would want to do that. If your ...


8

C#. Because it's the same thing, shifted up a semi-tone.


1

That's a great question. Let me tell you what works for me. When I write a song, I usually start with a chord progression because that is easier than starting with a melody in my experience. A chord progression will provide the framework for the melody. You need to know what chords go in the key you want your song to be in. Some handy charts might ...


7

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


4

Start small. Although it's possible to change chord progressions and scales in a song, it sounds to me like doing so effectively is currently beyond your skill level. So, what you will want to do is pick a scale and then harmonize the chords to it, or vice-versa. The first thing you need to do is decide what key you're in; this will determine the scale ...


-1

There are three basic functions a chord can have in a song: Tonic Function, Subdominant function, or Dominant Function. They get their functions from their numerical position in a key. Tonic Function (stability) I, III, VI Subdominant Function (contrast) II, IV Dominant Function (tension) V, VII This works in Major or Minor, A III chord and a bIII chord ...


4

Subdominant and dominant are tonal music terms, they may or may not make sense in a modal context. In tonal music (like common practice era classical music) you are hard pressed to find an Em functioning as dominant for Am. E is used almost exclusively. Today's popular music has more modal roots. A (non-raised) seventh degree major chord (G in Am) is a very ...


2

Maybe it comes down to the Human predilection to label everything. In, say, Cmaj., all the white notes( aka keys) on a keyboard can be used; n Amin., the same. They're the diatonic notes. So if a melody is only using those white notes, any chords produced from their combinations will fit the melody at some point. When the melody seems to gravitate more ...


0

Those are often just notes add to chords to give a musical piece depth. Jazz players sometimes talk about coloring chords in with added sevenths and ninths. Am7 This is just a chord with a seventh added. Regular solution of seventh should apply with these chords as well. Am6 Chords with sixths are usually passing chords where the sixth acts as middle man ...



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