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4

The resolution V to vi is called deceptive cadence. In C major this would indeed be G => Am, and in C minor you would get (maybe even more convincingly) G => Ab. The vi chord (or VI in minor) replaces the tonic and it usually contains the expected melody note but replaces the expected harmony (the tonic chord). This is possible because the vi (or VI) ...


3

The verse is just plain E minor. I understand your initial confusion, but you have to remember that you can bring things in from outside the key without changing the key. In this the harmony is simply built on and utilizes the different scales used for minor which are the natural, harmonic, and melodic minor. If you were to naturally build 7th chords off ...


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Thanks for the info everyone. A perfect song example of this is the rolling stones' "can't always get what you want". Key of C, chords are the 1 and 4 and then "but if you try sometimes" goes to Dmaj. So, it essentially changes key momentarily? I'm a self taught guitarist with minimal music theory knowledge, but I think this is a perfect song to use as ...


3

The minor pentatonic scale is just the minor scale without two notes (the 2nd scale degree and the 6th). Any harmony that you can create with the notes of the minor scale also work for the pentatonic scale. So all 6 natural power chords in C minor (C5, Eb5, F5, G5, Ab5, and Bb5) you can use with the minor pentatonic scale as there is at least one note in ...


1

Power chords (As in Root-fifth-octave) don't have a minor or major quality (they lack a third). Buuuut, you could imply a major or minor tonality by following the scale degrees. The Cm pentatonic scale is C Eb F G Bb. If you want to stick to pentatonic, you could use any of the above. For example, C5-F5-G5 would do a I-IV-V progression, which is super ...


0

The issue is entirely the diminished chord (or half diminished seventh chord). Unlike the rest of the chords, the root leaps a tritone instead of a perfect fifth. This makes it the weak link in the chain. In a minor key, it is the 2 chord, which comes fairly late in the progression, after the direction that the progression is going has been well ...


0

I would add something that may very well be controversial. I do believe the only difference between the minor pentatonic and the Major pentatonic is the notes they start on and that they are pretty much the same scale. a minor Pentatonic has the same notes as C Major Pentatonic so you could easily move between the two.


1

First it's important to understand when it is appropriate to mix minor and major pentatonic scales. If you have a piece in minor you will want to stick to a minor (pentatonic) scale. If you have a piece in major which is not meant to sound bluesy, you want to stick to a major (pentatonic) scale. You only want to mix the two in a blues context, i.e. either in ...


1

First, let's establish what those notes are. C maj pent. contains C, D, E, G and A. C min pent. has C, Eb, F, G and Bb. So, the common notes are G and funnily enough, C. C, being the root of each, is pivotal, as is the perfect fifth, G. Playing over a C major accompaniment, Eb will hardly sound diatonic, which is why it often gets bent up at least a little, ...


2

Yes. The last 4 are definitely a blues turnaround. Limited to I IV and V chords is consistent. In fact I can't seem to play it without making it bluesy. But I also agree with @herman's answer. The ear is the true judge. Since it is so short, it could even be just a phrase in a larger lyrical structure. If you play it in 2/4, with a Motown kinda beat... ...


2

There are many variations possible on the 8 bar blues, so this could certainly be one. I'd say it depends on the tune: does it sound bluesy?


1

The notes in your question form a G minor seventh (Gm7) arpeggio. Your voicing doesn't have the root note G as a bass note, but the fifth (D). The 'formula' for a minor seventh chord is root - minor third - perfect fifth - minor seventh (all counted from the root), which for a Gm7 chord gives G Bb D F (you used the enharmonically equivalent A# ...


4

There are a lot of different ways you can look at naming chord in general. I see two very likely candidates for the name, but first let's clean up some note naming so it's a little easier to see. Let's not call the Db a Db, but it's enharmonic equivalent C# as it will make the naming much simpler. We could look at it as some kind of B chord. In this case we ...


0

Since a blues progression usually makes use of the Blues scale, then in this case the C blues scale would be being used. This would be the following notes: C Eb F Gb G Bb C(again) Does the melody only make use of these notes? If so then it might possibly be a blues progression. Furthermore it does seem to look a lot like a blues progression, except instead ...


1

The cycle of fifths and the Phrygian mode are more or less orthogonal concepts. They're not mutually exclusive, but neither will do a good job supporting the other without support from other elements of the music. The Phrygian mode requires careful attention to establish the mode and its final (modal equivalent to a tonic), whereas a cycle of fifths ...


0

Matt is correct, this is characteristic of Flamenco music, assuming E is the root. This question is pretty vague, but I interpret it as saying the song is in A minor and but stays on E and F for extended periods of time during the instrumental, I would associate it with 80's metal, specifically, Randy Rhoads. He popularized the use of harmonic minor in ...


7

I think you're referring to Flamenco music. Its characteristic scale is the harmonic minor scale, which in Flamenco is often used starting from the 5th note, i.e. its 5th mode is used. That scale is usually called phrygian dominant. The notes of the phrygian dominant scale starting on E (i.e., A harmonic minor) are: E F G# A B C D Its main characteristics ...


0

The authentic cadence V7 - I actually has several things going for it. One crucial element you're missing is the movement of the bass. Basses going down a fifth or up a fourth are very powerful and is one of the main reason this works. The movement from iii to I however is quite weak. Another element is the tritone between the 3rd and the 7th of the chord. ...



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