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While music can be very formula driven similar to mathematics the real stuff happens when you go away from the formulas or go put of the box. Flat 7 and Flat 3 notes & chords are very common particularly in blues and jazz. These variations from the norm are what can provide color and character to music. When in doubt go with the words of the great Duke ...


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Check both: mDecks "Mapping Tonal Harmony": mdecks.com/mapharmony.phtml and Cognitone "Harmony Navigator" and "Synfire": cognitone.com/products/index/page.stml Either one or the other will blow off you mind :)


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Just done a trawl through sheet music, to find it's been written with key signatures of C, G and E. The original, which lands on A, has no key sig. Most of the solo work seems to be using E minor pent/blues. It could be construed that it's in E, as that's the chord it gravitates to each verse. Or the chords could be explained (in E) as coming from ...


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There are many ways to deviate from the pattern. In this example a very common pattern emigres from the circle of 5ths. The chords don't belong to any one key, but rather come from multiple keys. You start with a C and go to G (I to V in the key of C), then you go from a G to a D(I to V in the key of G), then you go from a D to a A(I to V in the key of D), ...


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It's difficult to tell which are the passing chords from your example because there's no time values. Passing chords are of short duration and/or occur on off-beats. So absent that, I would look at the chord tones for each to determine what melody to play. F#m: F# A C# ("color tones": E G# B D) F: F A C ("color tones": E G Bb D) Esus2: E B F# Ebm7b5: Eb ...


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It is possible to have multiple keys in a song. Charles Mingus in 'Nostalgia in Times Square' changed 3 keys in as many bars. He used chromatic notes in the melody as well. So, don't try to narrow your progression down to only one possible key. Now, let's say you are in D major: F#m -> 3rd chord of the scale. F -> chromatic. The bass goes F# to F(natural) ...


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The song could be on G# major; It would be easier to say it's in Ab major scale. These two are the same scale and they are called Enharmonic scales. (I'm using Ab because it is more common and easier to understand). Here is how: Ab (G#) -> 1st chord of your scale. Ebm (D#m) -> 4th of the minor scale with the same name (Ab or G# minor) -- you are allowed to ...


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I understand your question. I think this is indeed a mistake in the notation, if my music theory isn't too rusty. The first two beats of the second measure are indeed clearly a tonic (I 6over4), considering that the notes are dbdg. And only on the third beat it becomes the dominant (be it dominant seven). The V should indeed be on the third beat under the ...


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It is because the 7 concerns also the dominant. You have two different chords for the same function.


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In figured bass notation thirds and fifths are implicit in root position chords. Therefore, if you just see a "7", this means R, 3, 5 and 7.


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I see a problem right away in the way you are looking at the analysis. When you analyze something and notate either a chord or a Roman numeral the chord is meant to analyze all notes and pitches up to the next chord/Roman numeral change with the exception of a few non-harmonic tones that are typically notated. Also note you are in the key of C# minor so the ...


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I don't know how you practice (you may already do this) but slow it right down to half speed and and focus on your accuracy. Practice the chord changes without the melody lines and go back and forth between each chord very slowly until you can do it without thinking, gradually bring the speed up again. Don't worry about rhythm just yet, all you want to do ...



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