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1

I don't think it's particularly uncommon for popular music to have both the verse and refrain end on a dominant chord, though in many cases the last verse or refrain will be followed by a (possibly instrumental) coda which either resolves to the tonic or fades to nothing. When that pattern is used (each verse or chorus ends with a dominant that leads into ...


1

Ending a tune on the dominant chord is a common technique for performers to keep the suspense and interest going in a given set. Usually that dominant chord will have some relationship to the key of the succeeding tune. (You are in C, end on G, then take off on a tune in G or D or G minor, etc.) It can be over-used, of course. I have also used this device ...


2

The making the ii chord major turns it into a secondary dominant of V (V/V) which makes V a temporary tonic. If you are ending on V in this case you would technically end on a tonic although it is not the tonic present though the rest of the piece. I wouldn't go as far as calling ending on V unstable as it is a very typical cadence that can be seen in many ...


1

In addition to Lee's answer, a Io (just for you Lee!) will sound good preceding the V, which could then end the song. It's not far off being a V/V, as in C, for example, V/V will be spelled D,F#,A,C - with a dominant 7th bit attached - whereas Io is C,Eb,Gb,Bbb (A). Which could almost be D7b9, another sort of V/V.


1

Preceding the V chord with a II chord is actually a perfect way to make it more stable. When using a secondary dominant chord, the song's key is momentarily substituted by the key of the fifth, which means that the II chord functions as a dominant chord for a moment. Hence the V/V notation, and the "secondary dominant" name. A logical consequence is that the ...


1

The reason why the circle of fifths progression works better in minor than in major is the higher flexibility of minor, in the sense that more notes are available than in major, without the need for alteration. In minor, all notes from natural, melodic, and harmonic minor are available without leaving the key. This is not the case in major. The consequence ...


2

One big chord in question is the 7. In minor, if unaltered, this chord is a subtonic chord, as opposed to its altered version where it is the leading-tone chord. So in C minor, diatonically, the 7 chord (subtonic) is Bb D F, while the leading-tone chord would be B D F. You can hear right away that in the minor mode, the subtonic leads just fine to the ...


4

As a bass player, I am typically trying to either play something unexpected/less than intuitive, or really awesome. Only when I am asked to fulfill a role in a band with a traditional approach to the bass part do I consistently end up relying on standard sorts of lines or the expected notes (there are definitely times where it sounds better to just chug on ...


1

Probably because that elusive dim chord moves towards the V then to i in minor better.Or it sounds better as a m7b5 as a 4 note chord, giving the same effect.In major, it sounds quite weak without the root (a 5 note) which would make it a V7.


4

You can try to use chords that are common to both keys, and re-interpret their function. For your example (A minor and B minor), the common triads are D, Em, E, and G (note that in minor both the 6th and the 7th scale degree can be either minor or major). Also note that a ii-V progression always leads nicely to the I chord. Examples: || Am | Dm | Em ...


3

A good way to a modulation is via a diminished chord. Thus Am - Ao - F#7 - Bm. As the dim contains A and F# (Gb for purists, maybe?), it bridges nicely. Or going bluntly, Am - Bbm - Bm. Or a staccato stop on Am, Then a rest, then straight into Bm. It shouldn't be difficult to re-pitch if that bit's sung.


3

The old standby is to treat the last link in the chain as a deceptive cadence, i.e., V-vi or V-♭VI. It's an old chestnut, but very effective at breaking the pattern and keep things moving at the same time. Other landings are possible - Bach used ♭II6 to usher in the coda of the fugue of BWV 582. If you're really feeling sneaky, you can break out earlier ...


0

I sometimes go against the circle of fifth if the chords match the notes well. So sometimes i go I -V-II for instance. occasionally, depending on the notes, i could follow on vi with IV and III with IV instead of vi. Not sure if this helps?


1

the chord tones for #IVdim are: #iv, vi, i , ##ii (where these refer to scale degrees). This contains two tones that are already part of Imaj6: vi, i And it contains two tones that lead into two more Imaj basic chord tones: iv# --> v ii## -->iii so you have a chord that has two leading tones into the target chord, this is why it is a natural choice of ...


2

While Matt's answer is not wrong, I would include a few other thoughts. My initial thought was that this could be a Common Tone Diminished chord. From my experience, this is something that has typically been associated with the Classical repertoire but could certainly be applied elsewhere. This would specifically apply to fully diminished 7 chords, not ...


1

Enharmonically this is the same as Idim7 -> I(maj7), which is a common progression (at least in jazz or jazzy arrangements). One famous example is the beginning of the jazz standard Misty by Erroll Garner. If you really have #IVdim7 -> I(maj7) then you probably actually have #IVdim7 -> I(with 5 in the bass), so the bassline moves up chromatically.


0

i agree with previous posters that there is no hard and fast rule on how long and how much each chord should be played. If the song is upbeat or high spirited, i might play the chords twice in a bar, or if a part of the lyrics needs an emphasis i could even play the chords at each beat. Sometimes there is a dominant prolongation that can encompass more than ...


3

The one that immediately comes to mind for me is the jazz tune "Autumn Leaves." It was originally written in Gm, but for analysis purposes it's easier to think of in, say, Em. In that case the chord progression goes Am7 - D7 - Gmaj7 - Cmaj7 - F#m7b5 - B7 - Em7 (ivm7-VII7-IIImaj7-VIMaj7-iim7b5-V7-im7) - and there's your diatonic 4-7-3-6-2-5-1 progression ...


6

I'm not sure if you're interested in classical examples, but this kind of thing happens all the time in Baroque music, almost to the point of being ubiquitous. One quick example that pops to mind is this section from Brandenburg Concerto #2. Start the passage right at (or slightly before) 2:00 (apparently SE doesn't honor t=### tags in youtube links). This ...


2

Especially in minor you'll find this progression quite often, actually so often that it has become a cliché which many people try to avoid. One example of this progression (in minor) is "Still Got The Blues" by Gary Moore (in A minor, so it starts on the D minor chord). The II chord (which would be the VII chord of the relative major key) is a ...


4

I have a tool made just for this: http://www.michalpaszkiewicz.co.uk/chordprogressiontool/ The program is open source too, so you can take the code and do what you like, or improve upon the project itself.


1

This is pretty close, but not exact. This site has a good amount of chords under separate urls. http://classpiano.com/chord-dictionary/ You could send your friend: AbM7 : http://classpiano.com/a-flat-maj7-chord/ AbM7 : http://classpiano.com/a-flat-maj7-chord/ Bb : http://classpiano.com/b-flat-chord/ Gm : http://classpiano.com/g-m-chord/ Ab : ...


5

I'm hearing two questions: 1) What notes are safe for me to play? 2) What notes are important? While overlapping, these are different questions that will each have a large impact on your solo. The first is easier to answer, but understanding the second will make you a better musician. tl; dr Try them all, but only repeat the notes you like. 1) Safety ...


0

It's easy to see a figure consisting of a stack of thirds, and think that this represents the chord. But this isn't necessarily the case. The figures here could more plainly be seen as merely ornamenting a central pitch with upper and lower auxiliary tones, a third above and below. It may seem odd to think of notes a third away as neighbors, since that term ...


2

When you wrote C#, by convention, you wrote C# major. And so in C#, the B and A chords are altered. The B and A chords do fit diatonically in C# minor. So you do have some interesting things you can do with this. It might help not to think so much of scales, but rather, neighbor notes and the possibilities you now have. This is especially true for the A ...


5

In general you don't need to use the same scale over every chord. This case is a very interesting, but common one in modern music and can be seen in a few songs including Unchanined by Van Halen. If we slightly modify one of the chords, the key becomes apparent. If you change the C# to a C#m it is easy to see the chords C#m, B, and A are in C# minor. Thus ...


3

If I may offer a different analysis of the excerpt in question, it appears to me that the progression moves as thus: I6/3 - ii - V6/5 - I Intermediary arpeggiations are upper-tertian embellishment that essentially just serves as smooth harmonic leading between chords. This is a very common progression for the period and a very common progression for JS ...


2

I'm inclined to agree with @dwn. The relative major here isn't particularly tonicised: it is just emphasised a bit by melodic motion through the upper auxiliary, and a slowdown of harmonic rhythm. It is otherwise just a natural conclusion to the preceding sequence. It's the next 2 bars that start to look a bit more like a conventional cadence, only Bach ...


0

I'm not well versed, but to me it just looks like a sort of not-yet-rooted tonic, with the G (last treble note in the 2nd measure) being a neighbor tone. I'd agree that the effect of mediant as anticipation seems negligible.


-1

Chords don't resolve, notes do. Don't worry about trying to make each chord a full dominant 7th of the next one. Look for melodic tensions and resolutions. Look in particular for tritones - the main tension element of a dominant-tonic type progression. There's a tritone between the G# and D in the E7 chord. Standard resolution would be to the A and C in ...


-1

I'd describe it as Dm going to C going to Bb (it seems perverse to call it A#, when apparantly in Dm, with a key signature of one flat!). I'm not sure Roman numerals are a particularly useful tool here, but (assuming Dm tonality) you could say Im, b7, bVI. Does an A7 come next?



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