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The basics of Roman Notation is that you first have the key. Eb: Then you have a chord that has its root on a certain scale degree. I, ii, iii, iv, V, VI, vii If the Roman Numerals are in capital letters then it indicates Major chords. Eb: V (Major chord build on the Bb) You also have the indications of whether the chord is diminished or ...


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E C#m G# A: Answer, key of E. Sharps in E are F#, C#, G#, D#. A is a natural note in the key. To determine sharps in a key: The note before the Key which would be D# in key of E is the last sharp. The rest follow the circle of fifths clockwise (each a 5th apart): F# C# G# D# and you're at E. C#m, G#, A, E: This is the same, key of E, using the same ...


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In the key of C Major using 7th chords as in jazz, the chords are C Major 7, D minor 7, E minor 7, F Major 7, G7, A minor 7, and B minor 7 flat 5. Count starting with C Major, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7. So in answer to your question, What would a ii, V, I be? Answer is D minor 7 (the ii), G7 (the V) and C Major 7 (the one). Other common chord progressions in jazz are ...


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Chord progressions are written with a sequence of letters representing the chord along with its attributes such as minor, suspended, or diminished. (Note: All chords are assumed to be major unless otherwise indicated.) An example would be C,G7, Am, F with the assumption that it would be repeated. Typically the bass line defines what your progression will be. ...


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They just want to know how the harmony of a song progresses though the chords of a song. The chord progression can just be viewed as the precises order of the chords in a song. The chords used and the order appear in offer a lot of information about the song and how they can play it. For example off the top of my head I know the chord progression for Let ...


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All the answers so far are correct but I would like to see if I can explain it in a different way that might make it easier for some folks to understand. Every song has a basic harmonic structure to go with the melody of the song. The chords provide the harmony and appear in a predictable predetermined order. So the chord progression of a song is not ...


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Actually, "chord progression" connotes a different level of abstraction than simply "chords". For each chord in a particular key, let's say the key of C: C major would be the "I" chord. D major would be the "II" chord, etc., up to B major which would be the "VII" chord. Of course, major chords are composed of minor thirds on top of major thirds. Minor ...


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A chord progression is a series of chords that are played in a song (or a part of the song). If a song has the chords C, Em, F, G, It means that all these chords together form the chord progression of the song. Many people abbreviate 'chord progression' to 'chords'. It's the same thing. You might also hear harmonic progression and/or chord changes (or ...


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Luckiest Man- Dm/F - which when written on the stave have the same key sig. one flat. However, he's playing with capo on fret 1. Say it Ain't So - Eb, moving to relative minor of Cm. Where is my Mind - E, and its relative minor, C#m. All use the V of the relative minor, which is usually a major or 7th chord not found in the relative major's armoury. A ...


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The way I was taught to determine a song's key is fairly straightforward: You list the pitch class (all the known pitches in a melody) and use that to determine the key. In this case, we have a collection of chords instead of a melody, so let's use that. I'm doing this more or less in my head, so please consider this a rough draft and let me know if there ...


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There is rarely one unique scale (key) that a given set of chords will fit into; usually, at least two scales will fit pretty well. Another way to see this: the difference between two scales can be a single note that is different; but if the distinguishing pitch is never played during the song, then which scale is correct? The answer is, whichever the ...


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Scales are in essence a series of notes a certain amount of intervals / semitones from each other. You can have the semi tones in any place in the scale. You can have various amount of notes in the scale. 8 notes in the scale is common as it represents all the scale degrees. Major Scales have the semitones between the third and fourth scale degrees and the ...


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In my own experience, I used to think that in order to compose a happy tune, one must stay away from minor chords. This is NOT the case at all. The diatonic 6 chord (in c major, scale degree 6 is pitch A.) One can construct the diatonic chord (a chord that uses only notes that belong to the key one is using) with 'A' as the root (the pitch on which the chord ...


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I'm going to tell you what I observe in very layman's terms without music theory terms. Let's for simplicity we're in the key of C. A lot of them have this progression: (F F#° or Ab7 /) C/G A7 D7 G7 C especially towards the end of a section. A possible "verse" (very common) is C / / / | / / / / | F / / / | C / / / C / G/B / | Am / Am7/G / | D7 / / / | G ...


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Structurally ragtime harmony is pretty much classical tonal harmony, but there are of course some idiomatic specificities that give ragtime its characteristic sound. One progression very characteristic of ragtime is the so called... ragtime progression (although it was used before, even in classical music, it was mostly popularized in ragtime). It's made ...



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