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-1

This was the initial post: Just for clarification about the term modulation: As a musical term it means the process of moving to another key (as TONICA) (root) by means of a chord-progression that clearly establishes the functional part (TONICA) of the new key. Sometimes it is enough to play a DOMINANT seventh chord to establish the new TONICA of a ...


0

I would rather say that there is no theory behind it but rather a kind of style and a tendency to connect chords in the shortest way possible. That meaning - every note of a chord has to go to the closest note of the following chord with the least possible resistance -> shortest movement and easy to sing if you see each chord progression as different ...


1

This progression works because of its strong chromatic movement. Note that there are two chromatic lines moving downwards. One of them (in the bass) was already noted in Dom's answer. The first is the bass line: Ab-G-Gb-(F) (the Gb can move down to the F, which is the fifth of the Bb chord). The other chromatic movement is F-E-Eb-D. Apart from the chromatic ...


0

Written and played properly, it's also used as a blues turnaround. Often with the notes played as triplets, the first 3 being Ab-F-Ab, etc. Ending with F and D played together.


1

Just studying the basics of music theory and voice leading should give you the tools to notice what's going on. No matter what the chords in the progression, it's pretty easy to figure out what is going on by looking at the notes in the progression, how the move, and what they emphasize. I quickly sketched out one possible voicing for this progression in ...


1

Look for a book on harmony? Schoenberg builds things up from chord positions to progressions (and rants about The War And Other Things!) in "Theory of Harmony" while Piston uses examples taken from common practice music in "Harmony," to name just two books. Some knowledge of counterpoint may also be helpful, e.g. to better understand voice leading.


3

As others have stated there is a temporary modulation. But the particular change you are referring to (IV to iv) actually comes from the Harmonic Major Scale. The scale was named by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. For instance a C harmonic major scale consists of the notes C D E F G Ab B (C). Contrary to the usual (ionian) major scale: C D E F G A B. Some good ...


4

The chord basic progression I - VI - IV - II - V - I has been around almost as long as tonal music. Pop song writers have used it hundreds of times, and so did Mozart. In the key of F, that is F - Dm - Bb - Gm - C - F. Add a few 7ths if you want, of course. But you can precede almost any chord with its "secondary dominant". The dominant of Dm is A, so F - ...


3

This progression immediately reminds me of Creep by Radiohead, though it is in C major, not F major. While there is no natural key containing F major and A major, these two chords together are very common in most genres, but especially in rock, which loves minor to major substitutions. D minor is the relative minor of F major, and while the key of D minor ...


5

A common place for this to occur is IV to iv, often then returning to I, which makes (in your F key) the Db a semitone from C, and Bb a semitone from A, both found in the F chord. The F, of course, remains static. It's the same sort of semitone pull that makes V7 work so well as a dominant, to I. 'Major to minor' is one way to describe it. Ironically, in ...


2

There a lot one can do when writing creating a progression to introduce chords that would not necessarily be found in within the same key. In fact, There isn't a key that naturally contains both an F major chord and an A major chord, but I'll focused on the chords you're interested in which is the Bb major and the Bb minor. For simplicity let's say these ...


3

It's just a temporary modulation. In jazz and older pop music, this shows up frequently in a progression called "downstep modulation", where you have sequential iim-V7-Is a whole step lower, so for example: Am7-D7-GMaj7 Gmin7-C7-FMaj7, Fm7 ...


-1

The upbeat is usually done on the dominant chord. I find it weird that your upbeat begins on the tonic. Your rhythm needs work. We do not want just minims all the way through the passage. The use of non chordal notes or some other rhythm needs to be introduced. Also to have a cadence that ends on the tonic in the middle of a passage is just simply not good. ...


4

Putting on my mathematician hat, the notion of distance is dependent upon many factors. The real question is what is it that you are looking for when you say distance? Do you mean that you are looking for harmonic similarity? Do you mean some sort of measure of auditory similarity? Do you mean how they relate on the circle of 5ths? The construct of a ...


14

The simplest metric, and probably the most frequently used (even if only implicitly), is to count the number of steps between the chords' roots along a one-dimensional line of fifths (or the circle of fifths, if you permit enharmonics and modular arithmetic). I say this is the most frequently used because chord progressions where the root ascends or descends ...


5

This is a big part of voice leading specifically where you look for common tones between chords in the harmony and how you can take advantage of them when transitioning between them. It's not really a formula as much as it is just assessing how related the two chords are. The basic idea is to just look what notes if any are common and if the notes move by ...


0

A fully diminished chord is a V7b9 voicing. So wherever is appropriate to use a V7b9 the diminished chord is already a part of it. In general, a diminished chord has a dominant function because it contains the tritone. A fully diminished chord contains two pairs of tritones, which means it can be used to resolve to four different target chords. For ...


0

If you want to get all pedantic about it, you can think of the I7 chord as being a tonic and ALSO being V7->IV. In other words, you're chaining extended dominant structures together, and when you do so, you create momentary "local" resolution tendencies, but become detached from the grand-scheme dominant resolution architecture. In the blues, the I chord ...


7

You are correct, the piece is in E major. If you use roman numerals to represent the chords, the progression can be written as: I - III - vi - V The reason that the III chord is major, when it should normally be minor is that it is in fact acting as the "dominant" (V chord) of the following C♯m (vi). It's almost as if you were temporarily shifting ...


4

The resolution V to vi is called deceptive cadence. In C major this would indeed be G => Am, and in C minor you would get (maybe even more convincingly) G => Ab. The vi chord (or VI in minor) replaces the tonic and it usually contains the expected melody note but replaces the expected harmony (the tonic chord). This is possible because the vi (or VI) ...



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