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I'm going to tell you what I observe in very layman's terms without music theory terms. Let's for simplicity we're in the key of C. A lot of them have this progression: (F F#° or Ab7 /) C/G A7 D7 G7 C especially towards the end of a section. A possible "verse" (very common) is C / / / | / / / / | F / / / | C / / / C / G/B / | Am / Am7/G / | D7 / / / | G ...


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Structurally ragtime harmony is pretty much classical tonal harmony, but there are of course some idiomatic specificities that give ragtime its characteristic sound. One progression very characteristic of ragtime is the so called... ragtime progression (although it was used before, even in classical music, it was mostly popularized in ragtime). It's made ...


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Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


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A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...


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C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


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In E flat (3 flats) the basic chords will be I Eb, ii Fm, iii Gm, IV Ab, V Bb, vi C, vii Ddim. The same I, ii, iii ... sequence as in C major, but transposed. Some of course can be 7s. Use of the notes will focus attention on the fingering; use of the numerals highlights the sequence.


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Yes. But it is all key dependent. In E maj. E will be I, E7 = I7. Minors are usually represented with lower case, so Em7 = i7. Are you a little confused with minors and flats? You won't be the first! Love to know why it happens though. As in the other answer, in A maj., E7 is shown as V7, whereas in B maj., E7 shows as IV7. So it will only work for a ...


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Roman numeral analysis is dependent to the scale you are writing in, while chords are absolute.So, E may be I when writing in E major, but it may as well be III maj in C major. E7 may be I7 in E major, while it may be III 7 in C Major. So, relatively speaking, you can write chords in roman numberals, as long as you define the scale. The very common C - Am - ...


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In rock music it is not uncommon for the root notes of chords to follow a scale, while the chords all are major chords (or distorted fifths, i.e. power chords which have an overtone series much like a major triad). Therefore it can be more meaningful to analyze the harmony of a rock song by considering what scale/mode the root motion implicates. Many of the ...


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Simply put you analyze the score. You need some rudimentary knowledge of non chord notes and the like. Let me give you an example to aid your comprehension. This is an excerpt from the piano piece La Romanesca by Franz Liszt. They key is a minor. In the first bar we have the melody in the right hand and the harmony in the left. The left hand jumps from A ...


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What's to "approach"? Those are the chords. They don't fit any neat system of all being in one scale. It would be ridiculous to invent constant modulations. Lots of music does this. If your system of theory doesn't "allow" it, find a better system!


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First of all, you need to find what scale the song is in (if any). This will be determined by the key signature and if it's a minor scale, there might be some accidentals. After you've found out what scale you are in, you need to see what notes are being played and make out which chord they form. For instance, you might see that the notes being played are ...


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I have the same problem. In Fernando Sor's study in Em (Op. 35, No. 24), the tempo is quarter note=88, and the passage is as follows (the b-chord is in the second measure): If I place the d#, b, and f# fingers first, I can add the b note. But since the b note is played first, and the tempo is 88, I place the b no problem, but I can never nail the other ...



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