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Cadences articulate structure; the stronger the cadence, the more important that structural point. You'll never find a composer employing an inverted V or a vii moving to chord to a root position I at a point in a piece that requires the great structural clarity, such as the end of a period, a section, a modulation etc. Root movement = strength. iii-I is ...


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The authentic cadence V7 - I actually has several things going for it. One crucial element you're missing is the movement of the bass. Basses going down a fifth or up a fourth are very powerful and is one of the main reason this works. The movement from iii to I however is quite weak. Another element is the tritone between the 3rd and the 7th of the chord. ...


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To be honest, I've never really bought the idea that the leading tone is all that important in a perfect cadence. How does that explain the pull of say ii7 , V(open fifth) to the Tonic. You could argue that the leading tone is implied in a Major key, but to be honest, I think the jazzier v7 I (yes minor 7th) has more of a pull than a lot of those leading ...


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The root movement of dominant to tonic in an authentic cadence is very powerful -- even more, it could be argued, than the leading tone movement. No other cadential formula has this.


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One important factor that influences how good these progressions sound is the number of common tones between the two successive chords. If we consider vii°-I, there are no common tones between the chords ({B,D,F} vs. {C,E,G}) so all the voices must move, making it a bit rough. On the other hand, if we look at V-I, we see that there is one common tone ...


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Taking C as the key, there's also Bo (inc. Do,Fo and Abo) that leads nicely to the tonic, C. And the triton of G (the dominant), which is C#7.They're probably not so common as they sound a little strange to people who are immersed in only Pop music. V and V7 are obviously far more commonly used, so it's down to familiarity. Which, in jazz players, will often ...


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Wikipedia has a nice explanation for what a cadence is: A harmonic cadence is a progression of (at least) two chords that concludes a phrase, section, or piece of music. There have to be at least two chords to create a cadence. But in your example Imaj7-I, there is only one chord. Just because you remove the major 7th, the chord doesn't change; it's ...


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A chord progression specifies a series of chords, and when they are played: | C | C | C | C | F | F | C | C | G | F | C | C | A chord progression doesn't tell you how to play the chords, only what they are and when they change. It doesn't tell you want instrument to use, what inversion of the chord to use, what rhythm or strum pattern, whether to play ...


2

While many technical terms in music have a solid and commonly understood meaning -- especially a lot of the Italian terms, and words like "bar", "crotchet", "pitch" -- "phrase" is a more informal term. Most people would understand it, but there's no authoritative, constricting definition. Most generally, a phrase is a sequence of notes that belong together. ...


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A riff is (usually) played on top of a chord progression. A riff is a progression of notes, usually played on top of some chords (could be played a capella, could be played over one chord, could be anything). There isn't any rule that specifies how long a riff is. A riff could be half a measure, could be 3, could be 6. A chord progression is a progression ...


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Please note this answer does not apply to classical music. A phrase is usually only part of a riff. For rock music a phrase is a sequence of notes that is surrounded by pauses (actual rests or implied pauses). Rock and blues are both based on narrative form, which on its most fundamental level implies direct vocal emulation. Phrase length is generally set ...


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There seem to be crossed wires here, with respect. Blues progressions basically use 3 chords, I, IV and V. True, often dominant 7ths, but that needn't muddy the water for now. There is a recognized order to the sequence. Actually, almost any notes can be (and are) used to create solos over these sequences. It's just that lots of the time, guitarists in ...


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First off, let's examine what chords are used in this song. There are many versions of the transcription of this song, most do not have the F#7 and instead have just a F#m which after listening to the song to confirm seems right: F#m A B E D C#7 All the chord besides the B,which can be viewed as borrowed from the parallel major key of F# major, can be ...


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To me this just seems obviously to be in F# minor. So: Main riff: i III IV Bridge: VII i VII V7 Then the D and A chords give a D majorish, D lydian kind of sound but it still ends with a VII i cadence so you could maybe argue we're still in F#minor. chorus: VI(I) III(V) VII(II) i(iii) Then the C#7 at the end of the chorus works to take us back squarely ...


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Learning to quickly form certain chords often takes an abundant amount of repetitive practice. There is not really a magic order of finger placement to make the chord in question easier to form quickly. The chord you describe is commonly referred to as an "A shaped barre chord". That chord shape is form of "movable" barre chord that can be used to play ...


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The voicings you wrote are two root position chords, specifically V to I, resolving in parallel. This is the absolute most basic way to "voice" these chords and is generally considered cheesy and un-interesting, mostly because the sounds is boring, or maybe too strong of a resolution for the middle of the piece, maybe ok at the end. It is a very flat, ...


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"All I want is to make song more dynamic, dramatic, more colorful." That is very vague and I have trouble understanding what you are asking. If you are trying to make music, everyone wants to make it more colorful, dramatic, and dynamic. So please forgive me if I answer the wrong question. Pop music uses the same few chords, often, and the use of them is ...


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My saxophone teacher gave me an exercise for practicing the arpeggios of various chords in a given key that contain the root note. The form might be difficult to play on guitar, but I think it could be a useful exercise on piano. The different chords are mostly formed by changing one chord tone by a half step each time. Each arpeggio returns to the root of ...


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You can also try half positions. Instead of using your I-M-A fingers for the left hand use the M-I and pinky. This will allow you to lock your hands and just slide the wholly affair down as you like. The economy of movement is much better like this and you get the added benefit of training your less intelligent left hand fingers (Looking at you pinky) Hope ...


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With time and practice, everything gets easier. Consider just playing the best you can for now, so that you don't stunt creativity by slowing progress while trying to be perfect. As you get more comfortable with playing in general, you'll find it easy some day to add it in the extra notes.


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The point of avoiding certain parallels is not that it would "sound bad". On the contrary, it sounds really good - so good that for centuries, this was the only kind of polyphony anyone ever used. The point is rather that if you want to write a polyphonic piece of music (and that was a radically, heretically new idea at th time), you'd better not lead your ...


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It depends on what you are trying to do. If you are using the chords as harmonic colour, parallel triads work fine. If you need some independence between the voices, parallel octaves and fifths aren't so good. Both with and without are perfectly acceptable, and have been since the end of the 19th century, provided you accomplish what you are setting out to ...


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Slide it, Man! In your "impossible" transition, I'm assuming you are already fingering an open A chord. The 2,3 and 4 fingers are in the same position as the B chord, right? Just two frets down (toward the nut). So, just leave them in position and "slide" them up to fret 4, then as they come into position plop your index finger for the barre. This will ...


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There's a lot of possibles when going into this topic and a lot to be learned. Let's take a look at a typical progression in the key of C to just get an idea of what is possible: C - F - Dm - G I - IV - ii - V The progression above is very typical and consists of triads built in the key. Without going outside the key, we can replace triads ...


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The root of the problem is probably your overall left hand position. The A-shape barre chords need quite a lot of pronation to get the fingers all “in line”. By far the easiest setting to achieve this is a proper classical guitar position, i.e. with the arm reaching towards the guitar neck in almost a right angle from below. Buy a footrest and ...


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Like with anything else, barre chords take time to play properly. I bet that your 1st finger isn't strong enough to correctly bar the 2nd fret all the way. I suggest figuring out where your limit is (where you can actually play an A shaped barre chord) and try switching to and from it to get use to it. A viable option if you need to play this progression ...


3

A couple of points. You don't have to leave out the bottom string. It can still be barred and played on the 2nd fret. You don't have to use three fingers for the strings 2,3 and 4. Obviously, 3 can be used, but you could make do with 2 or even 1, sort of 'barred' across the 3 strings, bent up so that the 1st string still sounds. B7 would work, although you ...


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Check out the Frank Mantooth book Voicings for Jazz keyboard. He gives some excellent worked examples, and the section on fractional dominant chords is an eye opener. That chapter alone lets you voice II-V-I progressions with gorgeous voicings for the V chord. Use this book to spell chords so they don't sound triadic and twee - but instead sound quartal and ...


2

I totally understand what you are after. When I first learned guitar, I just played the basic chords of the song with a strumming pattern that worked. My playing was okay, but I noticed that when more experienced guitar players played the same songs with the same chords, the arrangement sounded far more interesting and musical. Eventually I discovered ...


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The mainstay chords for most standard pop songs are I, IV and V. The minors are sometimes used - ii, iii and vi. The 7th chord, a dim., isn't put into a lot of songs. All these start as triads, and can have extra notes played with those 3. The most common is a 7th, although 9ths, sus 2 and 4, and 6ths work well. Alongside those are chords from the parallel ...



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