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1

You might want to consider the chord-scale technique too. Take a look at scales that can be used over each chord. Since you are playing major chords without extensions, you can imply an extension from the scale. You may use a G note over the A Major chord or C note of D Major chord for a Dominant/Mixolydian sound. Using Pentatonics over each chord (E major ...


3

While experimenting with those last two bars a bit, I came up with the Cmaj7(#5) chord, which in my opinion sounds quite good. The G# can resolve to the C chord's G, and the B can resolve to the C chord's C. An alternative interpetation is that your chord is actually a (enharmonically equivalent) Ab9(#5) chord (omitted 7th). There is a "rule" that ...


4

It's certainly possible for these notes to resolve to the I. Only, I'd argue what you have there is not so much Imaj7(♯5) as Imaj7(♭6)... and immediately it makes sense. For that chord is basically just V♭9 plus a I pedal bass note. If you ignore the pedal and add an F, since you omit the G note it's simply the standard diminished seventh ...


8

Cmaj7#5 to C doesn't sound far fetched at all. In the end, if something sounds good - use it! But, if something sounds good, there will usually be an explanation for why it works... In this case, Cmaj7#5 is a chord containing chromatic tension, that "wants" to resolve to something simpler. In particular, the two chromatic alterations to the chord (B, the ...


4

When in doubt, refer to the first rule of composition: If it sounds cool, it’s right. However, there’s also a sound theoretical basis for what you’re doing here. The common V–IV–I–I blues turnaround has the same problem as your song when leading back into another I chord, and the solution is similar. In blues, you usually substitute in a V chord at the end ...


-3

In music there is rules , one of them says that you can break rules so if G# to C sounds ok then use it , G# to C sounds a bit wired for an ending , But it can resolve to C because it has chromatic voices to the C chord. Sorry this is a short answer I'm away


-1

It all depends what the underlying key is. By itself the sequence means nothing, or anything. In C major at the end of a piece you would call it a tierce de Picardie.


0

I bVII IV is a very common progression in rock and pop and can be found in the following songs: Rolling Stones - sympathy for the devil Lady Gaga - born this way Lynyrd skynyrd - Sweet home Alabama (though, some hear this as a V IV I) Elton John - Saturday nights alright for fighting U2 - desire Van Morrison/Them - Gloria And literally thousands of other ...


10

This chord progression is extremely common in a lot of rock, pop and R&B music and is usually called bVI–bVII–I (where the b's are flat signs). In other words, the A major triad is generally taken as defining A major as the overriding key, but the preceding chords are taken to be major triads built on the lowered sixth and seventh scale degrees. Bob ...


4

Interesting harmonies can often be produced by moving a single chord shape/type around (transposing it), rather than by strictly using chords within a particular mode, scale or key. One example that has always fascinated me, for instance, is transposing major chords by the intervals in a minor pentatonic scale, something that is often done in pop/rock music. ...


1

Another way to look at it, apart from Bob's as usual, good answer, is to consider that E,D and A are all the major chords found in A major. If you were to solo over a piece in A maj., you'd use A maj. notes. O.k., you'd centre more on A, but probably on, say, E, you'd centre more on E. So the A maj. scale notes will still work, very similarly to how you ...


5

A good starting point is to write out all the notes in the chords you're playing (although if there are more than a few this might be harder). Usually (but not always), these chords are likely to be linked in some way harmonically, and so you may notice that all the notes are within one or more familiar modes or scales. For instance, the notes in the chords ...


1

The role of the bass primarily is to highlight not only the chord's root but it's fifth as well. You can approach the root and/or fifth with either: a chromatic approach (half-step below) a diatonic note (from the scale of the key the passage is in.)


5

When I'm composing a walking bass line, I think there are a few goals to complete, depending on how well I can play the tune or the progression. Play simple chord tones, maybe 1-3-5-3 or 1-3-5-7 through the tune. Better this than a trainwreck! Play only chord tones, but connect them to create a smooth motion. So for a I-IV progression I might play ...


8

The point of a bass line is to express the melody and harmony of a song. This means that you should play the notes that make up the chord as well as the notes of the melody. I know that sometimes this is hard, because a chord has (usually) a minimum of 4 notes and the melody can have as many and even more, but you need to find the most important ones. So, ...


5

I once wrote a software walking jazz bass line generator that created reasonable bass lines in 4/4 time given a key and a sequence of chords (one chord per measure). Source code is not available but I'll explain the basics of the algorithm here. I know it's not really art and it only represents a gross simplification of the actual practice, but it can give ...


5

Mark J. Smith’s video lessons at TalkingBass.net include an excellent introduction to walking bass lines. His technique is to target a chord tone (usually the root) at each chord change, using three kinds of walking movement to make the musical journey between each target note. You can use arpeggios, scales, or chromatic passing tones to make the journey. ...


8

A walking bass line can in principle contain arbitrary chromatic runs, but obviously it's not a good idea to do that all the time. Often it's best to keep mostly to the chord notes and add some extra melodic spice just when it makes sense for supporting the harmonic movement. Other times, there may be a particular melodic line consisting almost entirely of ...


0

These chords are known as slash chords or hybrid chords. For example: C/B, where C is the chord and B is the bass note. From Jazzology: With a diagonal line, the symbol above refers to a chords while the one below to a bass note only. Note that when there is a horizontal line, it refers to a different thing (polychord). A slash chord might sound ...


3

In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


0

Changing the doubling of IV6 will not help, as the issue concerns the progression of the root, which must appear in at least one inner voice. The doubling is definitely the lowest-priority rule, so 4 should proceed to 2, possibly jumping up to 5 if necessary to connect to the next harmony. (Taking advantage of the fact that the original asker did not specify ...


5

As the other answers have said, a secondary dominant is a 7th chord that resolves to a chord other than the tonic. The classic example is a D7 chord in the key of C: the D7 resolves to G, which itself resolves to C. Dominants create tension To understand the theory and practice behind secondary dominants, you have to understand that all dominant chords ...


3

Theory Secondary Dominants are chords that are the Dominant (V) chord of a certain key other than the Tonic (I) key. For example, let the current key be C Major. An F Major chord is the Subdominant (IV) of the current key (C Major). How about a C Dominant 7th chord? That is not in the current key, but you know it's the Dominant 7th (V7) of F Major, and F ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


2

A secondary dominant chord is when you turn a minor or major 7th chord into a dominant chord, in order to make another chord the tonic chord. I can't tell you exactly what's the theory behind this, but I can tell you a bit about how they're used, not so much for composition but for arrangements: Take for example a typical chord progression I-VI-II-V. If we ...


2

While melodies usually emphasize chord tones of the harmony, the relationship varies greatly between styles and even from one song to another. For example, some blues solos strictly follow the chord tones of the underlying 12-bar progression, but others stick closer to the tonic center while the harmony changes around it. You could even play a legitimate ...


0

I think a simple theoretical concept that might help bridge the gap here is the notion that a chunk of the melody ITSELF can often be reduced to the arpeggiation of one of the basic chords of the key. If you can spot an arpeggiation of this type, you can harmonize a bunch of melodic notes at once, rather than running the "what chords fit under this note" ...


10

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


5

As you said, the first four chords can be understood as chords from E mixolydian. Note that from then on the chords follow a downward movement in minor thirds (at least enharmonically): E => C# => A#/Bb => G and from there to B, the V of E. The downward movement in minor thirds is equivalent to going from a minor scale to its relative major scale (and that's ...



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