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While melodies usually emphasize chord tones of the harmony, the relationship varies greatly between styles and even from one song to another. For example, some blues solos strictly follow the chord tones of the underlying 12-bar progression, but others stick closer to the tonic center while the harmony changes around it. You could even play a legitimate ...


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I think a simple theoretical concept that might help bridge the gap here is the notion that a chunk of the melody ITSELF can often be reduced to the arpeggiation of one of the basic chords of the key. If you can spot an arpeggiation of this type, you can harmonize a bunch of melodic notes at once, rather than running the "what chords fit under this note" ...


10

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


5

As you said, the first four chords can be understood as chords from E mixolydian. Note that from then on the chords follow a downward movement in minor thirds (at least enharmonically): E => C# => A#/Bb => G and from there to B, the V of E. The downward movement in minor thirds is equivalent to going from a minor scale to its relative major scale (and that's ...


2

I'm an accompanying musician and I do this all the time with the musical styles that I'm familiar with. Have you ever faked singing along with a song that you've never heard before? It's the same thing with musicians writ large. The very brief gap in the first bar is where the musicians establish the key, the style and the general form of the song. All ...


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D7/A says play a D dominant 7th chord, with an A bass.That should be sufficient. The other part gives the same information in a different way.The chord will contain D, F# A and C, with A underpinning the rest of the notes.


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This is a tonic (chord I) seventh chord in second inversion. It could also be written I7c; the use of numbers is called figuring (or figured-bass). (However, it is odd to see D7/A written below it, as this implies a dominant seventh chord, rather than a seventh chord on chord I.) The "I" refers to which degree of the scale the chord is built on; in this case ...


3

The problem is IV doesn't lead very well to V. You will not be able to keep any common tones going from IV to V unless it is a 7th. Just let the tenor drop a 3rd to the C, let the Alto go down to the F, and let the Soprano go down to the A. Your outer voices will have to be in contrary motion with each other and the only parallel motion will be 3rds.


2

There are no common tones unless you change one of the chords, say, make the F chord an F7. Assuming this is some kind of music theory class homework assignment, my advice to you is just try to make the upper voices move contrary to the bass. After that, you can just let the common tones guide you through the rest of the exercise.


3

You've already received several good answers, but I would like to add one thing that I consider important. The progression in your question is a well-known example of a more general concept know as modal interchange. Modal interchange is the borrowing of chords from parallel tonalities. The most common form of it, which can be found in thousands of pop ...


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Borrowed chords—that is to say, chords that belong to the parallel key—are actually quite common, and borrowed IV or iv chords are probably the most common of all. This is an example of a iv chord borrowed from the parallel minor. In general, the function doesn't change—the normal IV would have functioned as a predominant chord leading to V, the borrowed ...


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I agree with the other answers that iv contains a chromatic passing tone that enhances the horizontal (melodic) structure. For a vertical (harmonic) perspective, iv is closely related to the neapolitan sixth chord (in this context, Db major in first inversion), a standard 19th-century substitution for IV or ii. Thinking this way, the substitution of ...


0

I analyze the first two lines as follows: I - vi - IV - (passing iii) - ii - V - iii - V/ii - ii - iv - V - I To my ear, ii (Bm) and iv (Dm) have the same harmonic function, so @rlo's answer is a good horizontal (melodic) interpretation. I think the reason it is also effective vertically (tonally) is that the F-natural implies the neapolitan chord. (Try ...


2

I think what's happening is .. Your ears become accustomed to the C maj key F is a nice chord to deviate to from C Fm is the same but the major note (A) is flattened from A to Ab. Kind of implies it's going somewhere but for that moment it sounds a bit out of place .. Finally it resolves to a C. the Ab is flattened again to a G (5th of the C). So your ...


8

The chord progression for the introduction is: Am - C+ - C - D7 - F - Fm - C However, you can see it as Am - C - F - C (or vi - I - IV - I), and the chords in the middle are only chromatic passing notes, i.e. • In the sequence Am - C you have (A,C,E) that goes to (C,E,G). E and C are common to both chords and A and G are one tone apart. Add a chromatic ...


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Bm chord - (B D F#) to Dm (D F A) I could only guess that the writer wanted the notes F# - F -E leading to a resolution on the following E chord.


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Tension and release. The point of a leading note is often to give a feeling that it needs to move, as little as possible, to the tonic. As in G chord, dominant of C, contains B, which needs to move to the tonic C. A semitone move is used in this example. The F minor chord has F, Ab and C. To move as little as possible to the tonic involves the Ab going to G, ...


1

The others have adequately addressed the theory. It could be interpreted as centered around B major (with the 6th flat) or the B may be a dominant of E minor. It really depends on context and most analysis in Western Classical Music is comparison with conventions anyway. More importantly: You may want to listen to Purcell's Music for the Funeral of Queen ...


1

The convention is "Roots a second apart": "Roots a Second Apart (no common tone): Move the upper three voices in contrary motion to the bass, making sure each voice moves to the nearest chord tone of the next chord; the roots of both chords should be doubled." Though the first chord is an inversion: "When one of the two triads is in inversion, write to or ...



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