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Those are often just notes add to chords to give a musical piece depth. Jazz players sometimes talk about coloring chords in with added sevenths and ninths. Am7 This is just a chord with a seventh added. Regular solution of seventh should apply with these chords as well. Am6 Chords with sixths are usually passing chords where the sixth acts as middle man ...


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Honestly, the simple straightforward answer to your question is you simply make the necessary chromatic alterations in order to create the harmony you desire. For example, you bring up the "1-4-5 in major and the rest in minor". You only want to do this if you in fact want to STRONGLY establish the key of of the tonic. By making these alterations, you are ...


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You need to understand why constructing triads on different scale degrees of different modes results in different chord shapes. "1-4-5s in major and the rest in minor " is almost right (for Ionian), but not quite. (in other words : it's wrong!) To start with, forget the other modes and just consider the Ionian / Major scale. Have a look at How to find out ...


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Tricky question. From musical theory I know of no reason not to use any of the chords of the key in any order. Yet actual music tends to be strongly restricted both to a limited set of chords and to a limited set of orderings of those such that it is suprising every time if there are more of them used. A chord progression makes sense if it ...


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Classical harmony revolves around the concept that the music is leading somewhere. So, very generally, if you can enhance the sense that the music is going somewhere, it will work well. The simplest way to get a strong sense of direction is using the progression V-I. You can use the trick for other chords as well. If you know you want one chord at a ...


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Topo gave an excellent answer. I think simply put, your choice of chords (and therefore, your ultimate choice of harmonic progression and overall "harmony" of a bar/phrase/section/piece) should be used in a way that is stylistic (in other words "this is the sound I like/want") but also have a goal. Remember that when composing, it is not just about how one ...


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On a 12 bars blues in A, you can play A minor pentatonic or blues scale trough the whloe blues, once you are confident with that you can play A major blues scale(same notes as F#minor blues scale) over the I7 chord and and A minor blues scale over IV7 and V7 chords is a great way to start geting more sounds into the blues. After you can switch between those ...


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In answer to your penultimate question - Probably the most common chord change is up a fourth, as in Am - Dm, or C - F. It occurs in just about any tune in existence in the Western world. It was found to be something that worked, and sounded good and natural, so it gets used. Any diatonic chord can and does follow any other, without sounding 'out of tune' to ...


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You can think of music theory in two parts : The 'scientific' part : Physics and psychoacoustics The 'stylistic advice' part : Patterns and practices that have been observed to be common to certain musical styles - i.e. if you want this kind of sound, you should do this. From the scientific point of view, maybe we can observe that Some notes have ...


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The big thing here is to understand that you can use any notes you want as long as you do it in a way that will strengthen or weaken your tonality of any given key. There are no set "rules", but understand that by introducing non-diatonic notes, it will have an effect on the tonality of your piece/phrase/bar or on how you are modulating to a new key. EDIT: ...


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Understanding these more complex kinds of musical phenomena depends ultimately on one's own interpretation. The analysis in the first link you've provided calls Bb the tonic chord during the entirety of the chromatic neighbor motion in question. My view of this passage, however, is that Eb is in fact functioning as a local tonic, with Bb as its dominant. ...


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Let's take a look at the successions and see what leaps to the eye. We'll use C major for simplicity's sake. The first one, Ex. 1, has a very nice bass for a cadential progression... in E minor. That's the essential problem with it - B isn't acting as a leading tone, it's acting as if it were a dominant root. Put the C chord in root position, and you've ...


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Because the V6 (first inversion) has the leading tone as the bass note. During the common practice period, if the leading tone was on the bass or the soprano voice, it would go to the tonic. So, following V6 you would need the tonic as the bass note in the next chord; can't be any kind of inversion. Just root position. I don't see anything wrong with ...


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Amateur pop composer thoughts: the augmented tonic gives a method of moving to the relative minor (vi) with an "ascending" (and chromatic) feel. As opposed to using, for example, the iii chord, which feels kinda "descending". Good example is Frank Loesser's "Inchworm".


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Play the C minor (harmonic) scale and form chords (i.e. tonic, supertonic, etc) and discover that it's your Mediant (3rd note) - hence they can work very much in minor compositions but they work more as modulations helping to resolve within the notes/chord tones. Alternatively, you can push deeper a whole tone ahead or a sub dominant.



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