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I read somewhere that any melody line can be harmonized using the I,IV and V chords of the major scale. The reasoning behind this being that any possible note played in the melody will exist in one of these chords. Firstly, that reasoning only makes sense if the imagined melody line that stays within the major scale. The idea will 'fail' for any ...


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Chords that work together are found using the diatonic notes - C, Dm, Em, F, G Am and Bo. Also found to work are the chords from the parallel minor. So, Cm, Do, Eb, Fm, Gm , Ab and Bb. The chords in the sequence are C, Fm, Ab and G. All part of the previous lists.


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Like with anything else in music, follow the notes and the common tones and they'll tell you all you need to know. The basic idea that is presented in this progression combination of chromatizim though modal mixture along with the traditional resolutions we expect. Let's put a key to this progression. If we were in C major, this progression would map to C, ...


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I read somewhere that any melody line can be harmonized using the I,IV and V chords of the major scale. The reasoning behind this being that any possible note played in the melody will exist in one of these chords. My question is whether this is true, and if not, in what context would this idea fail? I'm going to try and take a stab at this. ...


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This is generally true of a melody in a major key. However, things can be more complicated in actual usage. If the melody contains chromatic notes that are not in the key, the basic three chords may not work. Also if the melody modulates into an entirely different key than the original key, it won't work either. There are many songs where the melody does ...


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The I,IV,V are the basic chords in a scale. The other chords (ii,iii,vi, vii) can be 'created' from these chords by substituting some notes for some other. Let's take the C major scale: I: C,E,G IV: F,A,C V: G,B,D The remaining chords are: ii: D,F,A -- Take IV, remove C and add D. iii: E,G,B -- Take V, remove D and add E. vi: A,C,E -- Take I, remove G and ...


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I'll start a Community Wiki on this: Over The Hills And Far Away by Led Zeppelin has fairly fast chord changes in the main section of the song. Custard Pie by Led Zeppelin In My Time Of Dying by Led Zeppelin Black Dog by Led Zeppelin (the chorus/chord sections) Under The Bridge by Red Hot Chili Peppers The Greeting Song by Red Hot Chili Peppers Say It ...


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There are several correct answers, but the best is clearly C C/B Amin7. Points other answer missed: Second inversion chords are fairly unusual, and mostly used in cadences. They are particularly "weak", and there's no functional reason to call your second chord an Emin7/B. What is the chord doing? That's the entire question here and why we have the topic ...


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Many (perhaps even most) chords played on guitar could be correctly identified (by itself) as more than one chord! The most appropriate name to use in a given context depends on - the context. Chords in a song don't appear by themselves. They appear as part of the entire song. Things to consider when choosing which of several possible names to call a ...


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C/B could be called an Eminor chord with a minor 6th in second inversion; it's the same thing. It really depends on where you want to go with harmony. Both are valid and both are commonly used, so I cannot decide for sure which one to choose. Both C - C/B - Am7 and Am7/C, Am7/B, Am7 seem correct in a chord progression. I would suggest to look at the melody ...


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Em6 is actually confusing, as it's an Em chord, but the 6th bit is a major 6th - C#. So it can't be that anyway. Best call the sequence C, Am7/B, Am7. That way, musos would see the transition between C and Am7 with an altered Am7 chord sandwiched between. Trying to name a chord from its 'root' note is not going to help. Yes, it could be a B something, but ...


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Any will do actually. Unless you wanna use the relative minor of E major (C#m). Though if you wanna continue with E-E-E, then maybe SAT would be S= E E E, A= B G# B, T= same as A, but an octave lower. It might be hard to figure out though, since E major can't be found in an A minor scale. Are the 3 chords in the same measure?


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These are the 7 chords formed using the notes from the D major scale (D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#). So, yes, the answer is that the progression is in D major


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The old adage still applies, perhaps more than ever: you can't polish a turd. The reason why jazz musicians don't play pop songs is that unlike the blues and American Songbook, pop songs do not have well constructed melodies which naturally suggest sophisticated harmonies. Over the past 50 years I have written well over 1000 arrangements. Some of which I ...


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Whether you move up or down, the progression will sound the same. Which way you choose purely depends on the song. There are times were the composer (or some other musician) will specifically ask you to move a certain way; if not, try both of the ways yourself and see what fits best. If the melody moves up, it might sound nice to move along with it. It will ...


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Yes they are all the same chord progression. When just given the Roman numeral analysis or chord symbols of the progression, the exact voicings do not matter nor does what octave you play them in. However it should be noted that what voicings you use, what octave you play in, and how much you move from one chord to another affect how what you play sounds. ...


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A progression that defines rock music in a way that is derived from blues music, and you'll see that often, is using the bIII chord in a major key, along with the IV and V (or V7) chord. E.g. E and G. G here fits within de E minor pentatonic scale. It's quite common to see E going to G, and then to A, making a I, bIII, IV progression. You can hear it in ...


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Chords that include the tritone - in G7 that's the F and B - have a pull towards resolving the F to E and the B to C. Hence G7 as the "dominant 7th" of C major. Where there is no tritone, though there's always an overall pull towards "home", the tonic note/chord, it's less insistent. You needn't think of a maj7 chord "resolving", more of where ot might ...


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Some chord sequences to explore starting with Emaj7, these may help you to start to develop a vocabulary of sequences that work: Emaj7 - E6 - F#m7 - F#m+6 Emaj7 - F#m7 - G#m7 - F#m7 Emaj7 - Fdim - F#m7 - Gdim - E/G# - G#/F# - C#m/E Emaj7 - C#m7 - Amaj7 - E/G# - A/C# - B/D# - C#/F - Fdim - F#m7 Emaj7 - Amaj7 - B - C#m - A - B/F# - E Obviously this is not ...



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