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You can isolate each note one by one and find chords that sound well with it. Now the trick is that the next chord must 'flow' nicely while coming from the previous one so that it won't sound like some random chords, but chords related to each other. There is a really interesting done by Publio Delgado here, that uses popular youtube videos and harmonizes ...


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Steps to improvising a melody from random notes: Sing the notes to yourself. See if by singing the notes over and over you spontaneously create a melody. See if a counter-melody suggests itself to you that responds to this spontaneous melody. Play the note sequence as stated Play any melody or counter-melody. Add connecting notes between the notes of ...


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Previous replies should answer a lot of your questions. The first three notes in your YouTube example are B, D and F. Those are the third, fifth, and seventh notes (chords) of the key of G. He is playing some kind of a G Major scale. It sounds like he plays G Major 7, D7 the V7 and the vii, F minor 7 flat V. It could be played as all 7th chords or other ...


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Great scene! Well, it happens that those notes fit on some scale. I don't know, let's say, for example, A major. So, this scale is composed of the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F# and G#. This gives you a framework to work with. With those notes, you can play chords and/or melodies. Each scale gives you a framework to improvise with.


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The easiest way to do it is write all the music for the scene before you shoot the movie! But seriously, this is pretty much the way that composing music has always been taught and learned. It's the same technique as learning a foreign language: you start by responding to simple musical ideas that only require a small musical "vocabulary" and "grammar", ...


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Seeing as the vast majority of country music has the basic 1/4/5 chord progression, and no one is really questioning Brad Paisley's artistic integrity, I think you are OK. Also there are a fair number of jazz standards than many musicians play differently, even though they may all be built on the same harmonic structure. It is clear that this... ...


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As you're trying to write six songs, it's probably no bad thing that they share some harmonic material, as it will help them sound like they belong together. Say songs 1 and 6 share a common chord sequence - the audience will get a satisfying feeling of closure because they're hearing material they heard earlier. If you think two of your songs sound much ...


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I know your question has been answered well by Tim. Also what matters is the performance. People love a great performance and if you can do that your songs will be a success. If it pleases that is what counts. If you want to experiment you might try some chord substitutions such as tritone subs. I don't know your songs, but probably most important idea is ...


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There are many English folk songs and Celtic tunes and airs that use the Dorian Mode, Mixolydian Mode, and the Aeolian Mode (the Aeolian is perhaps not as exotic as the other two, so maybe these don't stick out as much). Dorian tunes include The Swallowtail Jig, Road To Lisdoonvarna, Scarborough Fair, All Things Are Quite Silent (which also has a B Part ...


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Secondary dominants perform a very specific function. They are used to temporarily tonicize whatever the chord is a dominant of. They are not used to modulate as if they were, they just become dominants of the key you modulate to. Let's look at an example using the classic ii7-V7-I in C which is Dm7-G7-Cand a very common use for secondary dominants. In this ...


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One place where secondary dominants are often used is where the music doesn't want to go straight to the dominant, but sounds like it's going to modulate to that dominant, although in reality it's just going through a 'minimodulation' to come back to the original key. It works particularly well if a melody note is in the root chord, but also in the ...


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At the end of the day you should do what resonates with you. A lot of the time, some of the coolest and most interesting sounds/chords come from stepping outside normal scales. I recommend you explore new possibilities, because you might find something awesome which you might wanna use in the future; don't limit yourself. If you really have to, you can ...


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Most excellent responses from Lee and Tim. You can indeed musically explain any pile of notes. That helps you to better understand what you have created, and might help you find the next note or chord. Theory does not tell you what you can't do.


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As technical exercises, you normally do scales, arpeggios and chord progressions. If you want to do a richer combination of those, like doing different things in different hands, etc... you normally don't do exercises, but play Studies. Czerny has hundreds of them, for different levels, and some of them might be useful for what you want. Problem is that ...


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The function of the second chord can pretty reasonably be analyzed as dominant, as we'd have i - V - III, making it a sort of small deceptive cadence. In this case, the C is just a flat 13 of the E dominant, and these kind of extensions aren't exactly strange. This would make a lot more sense than a C aug in the context of the progression, so the actual name ...


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Let's take a step back and just get a grasp of what is being shown here. The notes on the staff represent the melody and the Roman numerals represent the harmony. The Roman Numeral in the harmony is valid until another Roman Numeral replaces it so yes the harmony is an I which is an F major chord throughout the first measure. The melody and the harmony are ...


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When you write the roman numeral denomination of the chords, you are implying that the notes that make up each chord are present, although not explicitly written in the score. So "I" in your example means that the notes F-A-C would be in some fashion played in an improvised manner by a performer or arranged or orchestrated by the composer for the orchestra ...


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The second chord is a chromatic passing chord: the bass line is descending (A -> G#) whereas the top line is ascending (A -> B). It doesn't really have a name which describes it properly (CaugMaj7 is a possibility as is Eaug). The third chord is a true C with G in the bass, so again the bass descends (G# -> G) and the top ascends (B -> C). So, viewing the ...



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