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26

In classical theory, the necessity or lack thereof of a particular chord member is generally determined by the note's tendency to lead to another note. That tendency comes most often from the interval of an augmented fourth or diminished fifth. Enharmonically, those intervals are the same, but in context, they are not, and they resolve differently. In a ...


21

The 'sus' is short for 'suspended'. The term comes from traditional music theory, and it refers to that the chord has a note that was suspended, or 'delayed', or 'carried over', from the previous chord. Traditionally the suspended fourth note in the sus4-chord should also be resolved to the third before any further chord action. Here is an example chord ...


21

It's a major 7th! C△7 would be C, E, G, and B♮.


20

To be clear: "sus" does not equal "add" - they are two different types of notation used for different purposes: Sus chords show a substitution of a pitch within a chord - whether it is sus2, sus9, etc etc, and typically illustrate the function of a moving line. A suspension is just one of three parts for controlling dissonance: preparation (sometimes ...


19

Context is important -- what else happens around the chord. Let's just take the C major chord for starters. Listen to these examples: The first two measures of Mozart's sonata "for beginners" in C major. A nice, pleasant chord. Happy music. The opening of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony. This has a much more energetic and heroic sound. The opening of the ...


18

Pursuant to Mark Lutton's excellent answer, I'd like to make the point that Chords don't give us feelings, we give chords feelings. The feeling you get after hearing a chord is not inherent in that chord--the only thing inherent in any chord is the physics of the harmonic series. (There is something to be said for consonance vs. dissonance within the ...


18

When a 13th is written in a chord name, this always refers to the major 13th, which is the same as a major 6th - in this case an A natural. This is one of the conventions of how chords symbols are written. It may seem a little odd that the 6th or 13th of a minor chord is major, but there are a number of situations like this. For instance, 7ths are always ...


18

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


17

I'd call it a Cadd#9 and there's a few reasons why. First of all if you think about the chord in terms of extensions a #9 is rather common and if you added a Bb to the chord you described people would hands down call that a C7#9 which is a common altered dominant chord. Second in general when naming chords we typically like to compare the notes to the ...


16

Why? It sounds good. Music would sound boring after a while if all you played were the notes in the scale. I would be hard-pressed to find music that doesn't have notes outside of the scale--scales are just the basis for melodies, and the home base from which you can stray in creative ways. In this particular context (and your chords would be better ...


16

There does exist what we call "rootless" voicings in harmony. These are chords in which the root is implied by the upper harmonies. Typically, the 3rd and the 7th are the primary indicators of chord quality, and the 5th is secondary. Rootless voicings are most commonly used in settings where an instrument such as piano or guitar is providing harmonic support ...


16

Let's take Tim's major scale as a starting point and build diagrams from there. This will get heavy beyond 7 chords, but they're intermediate/advanced so I may need correcting by some jazz experts! taking 1 as the Root of the major scale, and each number representing the degree of the major scale. so 1 3 5 = the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale. ...


16

Yes they exist. I don't know all of them of the top of my head, but I'll give you the three that come to mind easily. The first is a fully diminished chord. Because there are only 12 named notes and a fully diminished chord is made of 4 notes that are a minor 3rd apart from each other (3 semitones) there are only 3 different chords but each can be named 4 ...


16

It would be a G9sus4. It could technically also be F6/9/G but that would look very confusing on a lead sheet. When naming a chord you have to look at what you have and what you are missing. You have the notes G F A C D. While there is an F major triad, having a G as the bass doesn't make it feel like a chord based off F major because it is rare to put a ...


15

In classical Western music theory, each diatonic scale contains seven notes, and each of the notes must be assigned a different note name. (So one also does not write CX for the D in the C major scale.) In non-equal temperament, C# and Db may in fact be two different pitches, and a diatonic scale that contains a C must not also contain a C#. In more ...


15

A chord does not have to be made up of thirds. A chord is by definition two or more notes heard as if sounded simultaneously. Not all chords have three notes either. There are dyads (two notes), triads (three), tetrachords (four), pentachords (five), and hexachords (six). There's no limit on the number of notes, and also, by definition, there's no limits on ...


14

Well, a musical chord is by definition a collection of two or more notes sounding simultaneously. So, mathematically, in the usually used 12-tone pitch system of Western/pop/jazz music, there are 2^11 - 1 = 2047 different possible combinations of pitch classes modulo transposition (2^11 is the number of ways additional tones can be added once you fix a root ...


14

Unless you have a seven string guitar, this chord is impossible to play on guitar if you want all chord degrees represented. Since it is a G-minor chord over an Fm7, you can really think of the total composite chord as an Fm13, which is a pretty standard jazz chord for guitarists. . . or any jazz player for that matter. What notes you leave out in part ...


14

Just to expand on Pat's answer, there is a figured bass symbols for all type of inversion including root position. The picture above shows the complete figured bass symbol and how it will be denoted in analysis. As you can see root position triads and 7th chords have their own complete figured bass symbols, but reduce drastically because how common they ...


14

Adding a b9 to a major 7th chord creates a very dissonant sound because the chord then has two different notes that are a half step away from the root. The resolution would be tricky because the b9 would want to go down a half step and so would the 7th and the root needs to go somewhere. That being said however, I found a few voicing that sound good for it ...


13

It sounds dissonant because it is ! It is, and has been, for hundreds of years,the means of moving to the subdominant chord. Containing a most unstable tritone, as in E and Bb, in your example in Cmaj.,it needs to resolve to an F chord. Don't worry that Bb is not in the key of C, as it's in F, where the music is going, albeit briefly. Your idea of using a ...


13

They are called "5 note chords" and "6 note chords" because they are not so fundamental a component of music that they need a shorter name. A "triad" applies to many different three-note chords - always based around the root, a third, and a fifth -- but the third may be major (4 semitones from the root) or minor (3 semitones from the root), and the fifth ...


12

The notes C, E and G played together are always a C major chord. A C major chord is always the notes C, E and G. Fret that shape on a guitar, and it's always C Major. When you play in a different key, C major's role changes. If you're playing in the key of C major, then C major is the root chord - the I. F is the fourth chord (IV) and G is the fifth ...


12

Dominant is the fifth chord of a scale. For example in the C Major scale,the G chord is called Dominant. The 7th of G is F natural. So the G7 chord would be G B D F, but if you wanted to have maj7 it would be G B D F#, but the C Major scale does not include F#. The C7 would be in the F Major scale. The key to F Major scale is Bb, and the Dominant chord ...


12

An interval is the difference between two pitches regardless of whether they are played together or one at a time. A chord is a combination of notes played simultaneously. Just to confuse matters, some sources define a chord as having three or more notes (personally I call two notes a chord).


12

Like you and others said, the main reason of using power chords is to avoid the intermodulation distortion: Thirds sound muddy with distortion. I think that they generally have two functions in rock music. One function is to use it as a substitute for a triad. Here, the third is generally implied. But it may be played by a solo guitar or sung by the ...


12

You can build chords on any scale. You would build chords the same way you build them in the typical major and minor scales. You would take a root note of any scale degree and add the 3rd above the root and the 5th above the root and you get your chord. I'll use the example you've given that is based on the different minors. In A natural minor you have ...


11

What I am going to write below is just simple jazz harmony fundamentals, and should naturally be considered as school stuff ! You have to understand the role of each voice in a chord, to define what should be played, and what can be omitted. Mandatory voices The root note defines the root of the chord, and must be played globally. I mean, if you have a ...


11

To answer your last question: Yes -- because it sounds cool. A common gospel piano thing is a IV chord with dominant function because it's over the dominant in the bass, i.e. F/G (in the key of C). Inversions were historically notated using a figured bass style. Slash chords are a relatively recent invention, and they can be used both for inversions and ...


11

The other answers to this are all good. However, I can see how they could be confusing to many people. So here is my attempt at explaining why the 7 in a dominant chord is lowered. First off you need the definition of the dominant 7th chord: ♭7 Major 7th 5 contains 3 1 This means, as you already know, that building a Dominant ...



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