Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Pursuant to Mark Lutton's excellent answer, I'd like to make the point that Chords don't give us feelings, we give chords feelings. The feeling you get after hearing a chord is not inherent in that chord--the only thing inherent in any chord is the physics of the harmonic series. (There is something to be said for consonance vs. dissonance within the ...


18

Context is important -- what else happens around the chord. Let's just take the C major chord for starters. Listen to these examples: The first two measures of Mozart's sonata "for beginners" in C major. A nice, pleasant chord. Happy music. The opening of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony. This has a much more energetic and heroic sound. The opening of the ...


17

The 'sus' is short for 'suspended'. The term comes from traditional music theory, and it refers to that the chord has a note that was suspended, or 'delayed', or 'carried over', from the previous chord. Traditionally the suspended fourth note in the sus4-chord should also be resolved to the third before any further chord action. Here is an example chord ...


15

There does exist what we call "rootless" voicings in harmony. These are chords in which the root is implied by the upper harmonies. Typically, the 3rd and the 7th are the primary indicators of chord quality, and the 5th is secondary. Rootless voicings are most commonly used in settings where an instrument such as piano or guitar is providing harmonic support ...


15

Why? It sounds good. Music would sound boring after a while if all you played were the notes in the scale. I would be hard-pressed to find music that doesn't have notes outside of the scale--scales are just the basis for melodies, and the home base from which you can stray in creative ways. In this particular context (and your chords would be better ...


15

Let's take Tim's major scale as a starting point and build diagrams from there. This will get heavy beyond 7 chords, but they're intermediate/advanced so I may need correcting by some jazz experts! taking 1 as the Root of the major scale, and each number representing the degree of the major scale. so 1 3 5 = the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale. ...


13

Unless you have a seven string guitar, this chord is impossible to play on guitar if you want all chord degrees represented. Since it is a G-minor chord over an Fm7, you can really think of the total composite chord as an Fm13, which is a pretty standard jazz chord for guitarists. . . or any jazz player for that matter. What notes you leave out in part ...


12

An interval is the difference between two pitches regardless of whether they are played together or one at a time. A chord is a combination of notes played simultaneously. Just to confuse matters, some sources define a chord as having three or more notes (personally I call two notes a chord).


10

To answer your last question: Yes -- because it sounds cool. A common gospel piano thing is a IV chord with dominant function because it's over the dominant in the bass, i.e. F/G (in the key of C). Inversions were historically notated using a figured bass style. Slash chords are a relatively recent invention, and they can be used both for inversions and ...


9

A major triad does not contain "a minor third followed by a major third" and a minor triad does not contain "a major third followed by a major third". A major triad contains the root, major third, fifth. A minor triad contains the root, minor third, fifth. Or, counting in semitones: Major triad: root, root + 4, root + 7 Minor triad: root, root + 3, ...


9

The feelings and emotions associated with chords are completely subjective, influenced by a combination of nature and nurture. This is why I might go into raptures over a piece of music that leaves you cold, and vice versa. Absolute pitch In This is Spinal Tap, the character Nigel Tufnel says that for him D minor is "the saddest of all keys, I find". Most ...


9

By staying in the scale of C maj., most notes will work over most chords made from the diatonic C scale.Even an F note over a C chord can be made to sound fine,so yes, stick with C scale notes. Some may sound inappropriate, depending where in the bar they appear. However, taking the second idea, think about, for example, F scale notes - only the Bb is ...


9

Actually the way you describe them in your question is one of the ways, called pitch class sets (http://composertools.com/Theory/PCSets/). EDIT: Except you use C major as a starting point, which I didn't notice at first. With pitch class sets you use the chromatic scale, so your chords would be (putting C at zero) [0,2,4], [0,5,10], [0,9,17]=[0,9,5]. ...


9

Just to expand on Pat's answer, there is a figured bass symbols for all type of inversion including root position. The picture above shows the complete figured bass symbol and how it will be denoted in analysis. As you can see root position triads and 7th chords have their own complete figured bass symbols, but reduce drastically because how common they ...


9

One helpful starting point, though you may need to gather some further information to fully comprehend and apply: Within a given key, all notes of the scale can be harmonized by one of three chords while giving a functional harmony. These 3 chords would be the I, IV and V chords of the scale. We can use C Major as an example: C Major Scale: C, D, E, F, ...


7

Your question covers several different topics but I think what you're interested in is Harmony. This is a very vast subject. As for the importance of what you lack as a rhythm guitarist, it largely depends on the style you play. Lots of artists just don't know what they're doing when writing stuff and just happen to know empirically what goes well with ...


7

I believe it is a less common alternate way of writing D7(#9), i.e dominant seventh sharp ninth (as in the Hendrix chord), with the notes D-F#-A-C-F. I've only seen it written as D10, but D-10 (as in D7(b10)) to some degree makes more sense in that the 10th is referring to the minor third. If the version of the song that I listened to on Youtube is ...


6

Interesting question! When you say "chord-leading," do you mean "voice-leading" or "chord progressions"? Voice-leading is controlled by the chord progression, so I suppose the rules of the one inform the rules of the other. But my answer, in short, is this: the chord progressions of the modes may differ from one another, but voice-leading rules will probably ...


6

Yes it should be noted maj add11 Similarly, is there a way to express in a chord symbol that two notes should be played directly next to each other, creating the same minor second dissonance? No, chords describe notes, not voicing. add4=add11. I jazz theory we don't distinguish octaves, and it's always 11. Guitar players have invented sus/add2 vs sus/add9 ...


6

There is not quite enough music to really know the key. 3 bars is not enough context. If I were to guess I would say that if this piece is tonal (not modal) that this excerpt is in E minor with the D# from harmonic or melodic minor to create a leading tone. Whether or not a c or c# is used for melodic content it would still be E minor, either melodic or ...


6

What he's pointing out is that you can use multiple names (homonyms) for the same combination of notes. For example, with three notes, C-E-G is obviously a C major chord. But you can also describe it as E minor, with the 5th (B) omitted, and a 6th (C) as the bottom note. In his notation, "Em/6 no 5" I would read this as "E minor over sixth no five". The ...


6

If the chord were a simple triad - D F# A# - then this would be called D Aug (augumented). Adding the C would make it DAug7, adding the E would make it DAug9, and adding the G would make it DAug11. Sometimes the plus sign is used instead of Aug, so calling this D+11 (but not D11+) would be possible. Unfortunately, D+11 tends to give the impression that this ...


6

My reply is based on jazz/contemporary knowledge, it may differ from the classical usage. Whether a 6 or 13 (or 4 or 11) is used depends on the context. When used in chords: C6 = C E G A = R 3 5 6, a major triad and a 6th C13 = C E G Bb D F A = R 3 5 b7 9 11 13, a dominant chord with all extensions up to the 13 (though any chord that has a ...


6

I really think the answer to this question has most to do with how music is composed. Tonal composers are not really thinking at all about the math behind the intervals; they're thinking about the sounds. Another way of looking at this is that all tonal music is scale-based, and when playing a scale from bottom to top you number the notes starting from 1. ...


5

The relationship of chords to scales is an important one to understand, as it serves as a foundation for songwriting, composition, and improvisation. In our chromatic system of harmony, there exists a scale (or many scales) for every chord, and there exists a chord (or several chords) for every scale. As an example, here are several chords that can be ...


5

It could be the case that the Andalusian cadence is attractive precisely because there is a certain amount of ambiguity to it (i.e., it can't be pinned down as either perfect or half cadence). If I may trust my own instincts on the matter, the cadence exhibits neither the "completeness" of a perfect cadence, nor the "incompleteness" of a half cadence; its ...


5

The chord progression you stated, I,II,IV,V, is very common in popular music, and you also let us know that you are playing this in the key of C major. As C is the tonic or root note in this key it would be most logical to play a melody in a C Major scale. Even though your rhythm guitar is playing other chords, all the chords you stated belong to the C major ...


5

All chords have the major scale (Ionian mode) as their starting point. They are based on the root note of that scale, giving the chord name, e.g. C maj. has C as a base (and usually) bass note. A basic chord will then follow notes 3 and 5 of that scale. E.g. C - E and G. To make a chord minor, the 3rd. is flattened, as C - Eb - G. Chords which have a ...


5

I don't have a reference to cite, but from your description and my knowledge I believe this constitutes a functional list of two note chords, exemplified as C chords: Interval | Notes | Chord name (semitones) | | ============|=======|=========== 1 | B C | Cmaj7no3 2 | Bb C | C7no3 3 | C Eb | Cm 4 | C E ...


5

They are figured bass numbers, as used under bass lines in (primarily) the Baroque era to indicate harmonic content to be improvised by continuo players such as the harpsichordist. The numbers refer to the diatonic intervals above the bass. Look at your 6/4 example above. The two distinct notes above the bass note are a sixth and a 4th above, hence 6/4. This ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible