Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

The 'sus' is short for 'suspended'. The term comes from traditional music theory, and it refers to that the chord has a note that was suspended, or 'delayed', or 'carried over', from the previous chord. Traditionally the suspended fourth note in the sus4-chord should also be resolved to the third before any further chord action. Here is an example chord ...


18

Pursuant to Mark Lutton's excellent answer, I'd like to make the point that Chords don't give us feelings, we give chords feelings. The feeling you get after hearing a chord is not inherent in that chord--the only thing inherent in any chord is the physics of the harmonic series. (There is something to be said for consonance vs. dissonance within the ...


18

Context is important -- what else happens around the chord. Let's just take the C major chord for starters. Listen to these examples: The first two measures of Mozart's sonata "for beginners" in C major. A nice, pleasant chord. Happy music. The opening of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony. This has a much more energetic and heroic sound. The opening of the ...


16

There does exist what we call "rootless" voicings in harmony. These are chords in which the root is implied by the upper harmonies. Typically, the 3rd and the 7th are the primary indicators of chord quality, and the 5th is secondary. Rootless voicings are most commonly used in settings where an instrument such as piano or guitar is providing harmonic support ...


16

When a 13th is written in a chord name, this always refers to the major 13th, which is the same as a major 6th - in this case an A natural. This is one of the conventions of how chords symbols are written. It may seem a little odd that the 6th or 13th of a minor chord is major, but there are a number of situations like this. For instance, 7ths are always ...


15

Why? It sounds good. Music would sound boring after a while if all you played were the notes in the scale. I would be hard-pressed to find music that doesn't have notes outside of the scale--scales are just the basis for melodies, and the home base from which you can stray in creative ways. In this particular context (and your chords would be better ...


15

Let's take Tim's major scale as a starting point and build diagrams from there. This will get heavy beyond 7 chords, but they're intermediate/advanced so I may need correcting by some jazz experts! taking 1 as the Root of the major scale, and each number representing the degree of the major scale. so 1 3 5 = the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale. ...


14

A chord does not have to be made up of thirds. A chord is by definition two or more notes heard as if sounded simultaneously. Not all chords have three notes either. There are dyads (two notes), triads (three), tetrachords (four), pentachords (five), and hexachords (six). There's no limit on the number of notes, and also, by definition, there's no limits on ...


14

Yes they exist. I don't know all of them of the top of my head, but I'll give you the three that come to mind easily. The first is a fully diminished chord. Because there are only 12 named notes and a fully diminished chord is made of 4 notes that are a minor 3rd apart from each other (3 semitones) there are only 3 different chords but each can be named 4 ...


13

Unless you have a seven string guitar, this chord is impossible to play on guitar if you want all chord degrees represented. Since it is a G-minor chord over an Fm7, you can really think of the total composite chord as an Fm13, which is a pretty standard jazz chord for guitarists. . . or any jazz player for that matter. What notes you leave out in part ...


13

They are called "5 note chords" and "6 note chords" because they are not so fundamental a component of music that they need a shorter name. A "triad" applies to many different three-note chords - always based around the root, a third, and a fifth -- but the third may be major (4 semitones from the root) or minor (3 semitones from the root), and the fifth ...


12

To be clear: "sus" does not equal "add" - they are two different types of notation used for different purposes: Sus chords show a substitution of a pitch within a chord - whether it is sus2, sus9, etc etc, and typically illustrate the function of a moving line. A suspension is just one of three parts for controlling dissonance: preparation (sometimes ...


12

It sounds dissonant because it is ! It is, and has been, for hundreds of years,the means of moving to the subdominant chord. Containing a most unstable tritone, as in E and Bb, in your example in Cmaj.,it needs to resolve to an F chord. Don't worry that Bb is not in the key of C, as it's in F, where the music is going, albeit briefly. Your idea of using a ...


12

An interval is the difference between two pitches regardless of whether they are played together or one at a time. A chord is a combination of notes played simultaneously. Just to confuse matters, some sources define a chord as having three or more notes (personally I call two notes a chord).


11

To answer your last question: Yes -- because it sounds cool. A common gospel piano thing is a IV chord with dominant function because it's over the dominant in the bass, i.e. F/G (in the key of C). Inversions were historically notated using a figured bass style. Slash chords are a relatively recent invention, and they can be used both for inversions and ...


11

The notes C, E and G played together are always a C major chord. A C major chord is always the notes C, E and G. Fret that shape on a guitar, and it's always C Major. When you play in a different key, C major's role changes. If you're playing in the key of C major, then C major is the root chord - the I. F is the fourth chord (IV) and G is the fifth ...


11

Dominant is the fifth chord of a scale. For example in the C Major scale,the G chord is called Dominant. The 7th of G is F natural. So the G7 chord would be G B D F, but if you wanted to have maj7 it would be G B D F#, but the C Major scale does not include F#. The C7 would be in the F Major scale. The key to F Major scale is Bb, and the Dominant chord ...


11

Like you and others said, the main reason of using power chords is to avoid the intermodulation distortion: Thirds sound muddy with distortion. I think that they generally have two functions in rock music. One function is to use it as a substitute for a triad. Here, the third is generally implied. But it may be played by a solo guitar or sung by the ...


11

A chord with those five pitches is a Gmaj7(#11). A major-seventh chord has a root, major-third, perfect-fifth and a major-seventh. So, a Gmaj7 chord has the notes G, B, D and F#. The fifth (D) would often be left out of this chord, without affecting the overall sound much, or the naming of this chord type. This article about extended (tertian) chords points ...


10

By staying in the scale of C maj., most notes will work over most chords made from the diatonic C scale.Even an F note over a C chord can be made to sound fine,so yes, stick with C scale notes. Some may sound inappropriate, depending where in the bar they appear. However, taking the second idea, think about, for example, F scale notes - only the Bb is ...


10

Actually the way you describe them in your question is one of the ways, called pitch class sets (http://composertools.com/Theory/PCSets/). EDIT: Except you use C major as a starting point, which I didn't notice at first. With pitch class sets you use the chromatic scale, so your chords would be (putting C at zero) [0,2,4], [0,5,10], [0,9,17]=[0,9,5]. ...


10

A chord is typically defined by intervals of thirds, minor or major. Intervals are the distance between two notes - if a note is three half steps apart, it is a minor third. If it is four, it is a major. Here is a little visual representation of intervals on a piano in the key of C. Not sure what those numbers on the right are... A typical chord is ...


10

It would be a G9sus4. It could technically also be F6/9/G but that would look very confusing on a lead sheet. When naming a chord you have to look at what you have and what you are missing. You have the notes G F A C D. While there is an F major triad, having a G as the bass doesn't make it feel like a chord based off F major because it is rare to put a ...


10

It's an Eb6/9 chord with a G in the bass. A major 6/9 chord is a chord that has the basis of a major triad and has a major 6th and a major 9th(major 2nd) in it without a 7th. The spelling is Eb G Bb C F. The full chord symbol would be Eb6/9/G. Also as a side note, it would be difficult for this chord to function as a dominant as the leading tone of C ...


9

The feelings and emotions associated with chords are completely subjective, influenced by a combination of nature and nurture. This is why I might go into raptures over a piece of music that leaves you cold, and vice versa. Absolute pitch In This is Spinal Tap, the character Nigel Tufnel says that for him D minor is "the saddest of all keys, I find". Most ...


9

A major triad does not contain "a minor third followed by a major third" and a minor triad does not contain "a major third followed by a major third". A major triad contains the root, major third, fifth. A minor triad contains the root, minor third, fifth. Or, counting in semitones: Major triad: root, root + 4, root + 7 Minor triad: root, root + 3, ...


9

Yes it should be noted maj add11 Similarly, is there a way to express in a chord symbol that two notes should be played directly next to each other, creating the same minor second dissonance? No, chords describe notes, not voicing. add4=add11. I jazz theory we don't distinguish octaves, and it's always 11. Guitar players have invented sus/add2 vs sus/add9 ...


9

The other answers to this are all good. However, I can see how they could be confusing to many people. So here is my attempt at explaining why the 7 in a dominant chord is lowered. First off you need the definition of the dominant 7th chord: ♭7 Major 7th 5 contains 3 1 This means, as you already know, that building a Dominant ...


9

Just to expand on Pat's answer, there is a figured bass symbols for all type of inversion including root position. The picture above shows the complete figured bass symbol and how it will be denoted in analysis. As you can see root position triads and 7th chords have their own complete figured bass symbols, but reduce drastically because how common they ...


9

One helpful starting point, though you may need to gather some further information to fully comprehend and apply: Within a given key, all notes of the scale can be harmonized by one of three chords while giving a functional harmony. These 3 chords would be the I, IV and V chords of the scale. We can use C Major as an example: C Major Scale: C, D, E, F, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible