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A triad is the simplest type of chord (The AB Guild to Music Theory) The three notes of a triad can be arranged in two different ways : in close and in open position. In other arrangements, they are called 'chords'.


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The word Temperament.can be used in regards to using a kapo but not in the sence that you suggest.depending on the fret location of the kapo. It can enable a vocalist to sing lower or higher or you can sing a song in the master key and change the chord pattern completely .to my understanding using the word temperament in relation to any musicial devise is ...


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Seeing as the vast majority of country music has the basic 1/4/5 chord progression, and no one is really questioning Brad Paisley's artistic integrity, I think you are OK. Also there are a fair number of jazz standards than many musicians play differently, even though they may all be built on the same harmonic structure. It is clear that this... ...


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As you're trying to write six songs, it's probably no bad thing that they share some harmonic material, as it will help them sound like they belong together. Say songs 1 and 6 share a common chord sequence - the audience will get a satisfying feeling of closure because they're hearing material they heard earlier. If you think two of your songs sound much ...


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I know your question has been answered well by Tim. Also what matters is the performance. People love a great performance and if you can do that your songs will be a success. If it pleases that is what counts. If you want to experiment you might try some chord substitutions such as tritone subs. I don't know your songs, but probably most important idea is ...


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The resolution to vi (E7 => Am in the key of C) is the most obvious one. It represents a tonicization of the relative minor key (A minor in the key of C). A very common alternative would be the resolution to IV, as pointed out by you and in ttw's answer. This is a deceptive cadence, where a dominant seventh chord does not resolve to its related tonic chord, ...


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V7 of vi resolves nicely to vi or vi7 or VI or VI7 or your suggestion of iv or IV.


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Another possibility (and my preference) would be C7+5. (Or C7#5, as discussed in the comments.) This way we clearly see that the chord is based off of a dominant C7: C E G Bf. It's fairly common to alter dominant chords in various ways, so the +5 just indicates that the chordal fifth of the C7 (G) is raised to G#. You could also have C7b5 which would be C E ...


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No. It's already shorthand.Nomeclature for chords has been established for a very long time now, and is pretty well universally accepted. The + sign means the 5th of a chord is played one semitone higher than P5. The 7 sign means include the b7 note. As it's written, it could nearly be construed that the 7 part is augmented, but with experience, one would ...


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I'm not sure there's anything simpler. It's a C augmented with an added seventh in first inversion. C+ is often used of augmented and the 7 is added. However, as augmented chords are not that common, I'd probably write C+m7/E as I'm not sure which seventh is the default for augmented chords and nothing the C+7 indicates an inversion. Had I seen a C+7 in a ...


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Slight correction to Tim's nice explanation above: Tim wrote, "So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, it gets called Am7." Actually, it is the root note A, a flat minor 3rd C, major 5th E, and a flat dominant 7th G, which makes it an Amin7. F/E is commonly listed as an F chord ...


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Most natural instruments will produce a tone which contains frequencies that are near-multiples of the tone; for some instruments such as the clarinet most such frequencies will be near odd multiples (3x, 5x, 7x, etc.) while other instruments will produce a mixture of even and odd multiples. For any two frequencies x and y which are present in a signal, ...


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The most common way to resolve any suspension is downward by step. Moving upwards is done, but suspensions are generally a tension-release technique, so in this case the standard resolution would be down to a D#. But there’s a bit more to it here. This isn’t really a true suspension, since the E isn’t actually held over in the voicing you have here. As ...


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It's fairly simple: if you are writing a block chord of any sort that contains the interval of a second, the lower note of the second is to the left, the upper note is to the right. If there is more than one interval of a second, the lowest is to the left, and the notes alternate sides. The exception here is for even numbers of seconds (the intervals, not ...


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To expand on Farbod's answer, chords sound consonant, when the overtones seem to belong in the same "class" of frequencies, most often harmonic or near-harmonic series, corresponding to periodic sounds we commonly hear, like human or other animal's voices. When you put those C1 & G1 bass notes together, they are approximately harmonically related (3/2 ...


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The issue is not due only to equal temperament, which makes the fifths slightly smaller (so "dirtier") than they should be, but also due to inharmonicity. Inharmonicity means that, due to the nature of the strings, the harmonics deviate from their theoretical pitch. That means that, for lower notes, the high harmonics may be quite "out of tune" so to speak. ...


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Another angle to this -- the slash/chord is often written on lead sheets / cheat sheets to help bassists understand what notes they should be playing over a particular passage. If you see G, D/F# and Em, for example, the guitar player would play G major, D major and E minor but the bassist would play G, F# and E. This gives a feeling of walking down to the ...


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The function of the second chord can pretty reasonably be analyzed as dominant, as we'd have i - V - III, making it a sort of small deceptive cadence. In this case, the C is just a flat 13 of the E dominant, and these kind of extensions aren't exactly strange. This would make a lot more sense than a C aug in the context of the progression, so the actual name ...


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One thing that springs to my mind is to resolve the suspension by keeping the suspended note and moving the chord underneath it to achieve a consonance, which should serve as a resolution, of sorts. For a Bsus4 in the key of Em, the options are C (which jumps out to me as the obvious first choice), Em, or A (resolving to the fifth feels weak, but may be ...


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There are chords that are played one over another, called bichords or polychords in general, such as the Petruschka chord (C over F#). They rarely occur in popular music. The naming convention is "X over Y", e.g. "A over Cm7". The notation looks like a fraction, with a horizontal line rather than a diagonal slash between the chord names: I don't think ...


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There's no "correct" way to exactly name this chord using the standard nomenclature.


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Given the notes C G A Bb, I would think of it as a Gmadd2 (no5)/C or taking the notes in the order which would come from C13 removing the third, ninth, and eleventh [C G Bb A] I would think of it as a Gm add9 (no 5)/C.


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The chords that we know and love are produced by basically using 1,3 and 5 of a major or minor scale. Thus, Cmaj. is made up from C,E and G. This odd number pattern continues with 7, 9, 11 and 13, the chords named after the appropriate number. So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, ...


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The reason the first section sounds dissonant is because the perfect fifth is very low, and so this may sound dissonant even though it is not. You can hear a similar (or possibly increased) effect if you have a major third instead of your perfect fifth at a similar pitch, because the notes will be closer together at the low pitch. In the second section, it ...



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