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1

The title of that part says 'G minor scale'.No mention of harmonic. There are different minor scales: natural, harmonic, classical melodic and jazz melodic. All have the same first five notes, rising, but it all changes after that. From the 5th (D) Eb, E, F and F# are available from the different minors. So there will be several different incarnations of ...


3

The I,III don't have their 7th lowered. The scale you are looking at is most likely the G natural minor scale and not the G Harmonic minor scale. The notes that are included in the G natural minor scale are the same that consist the Bb Major scale (Bb, C, D, Eb, F, G, A). The correct thing to say here is that on the V and the VII, some notes are raised. ...


4

These are not the seventh chords of G harmonic minor, but just one possible collection of seventh chords in G minor. As you've noticed, only the V and the VII chord are from harmonic minor. The reason is that these chords (usually) have a dominant function where the leading tone (F#) plays an important role. The other chords are based on the natural minor ...


1

As others have suggested, a tritone substitution is probably the best way to look at it. As an additional point of interest, it could also be seen as a form of Augmented Sixth chord on the b2 scale degree. The Db and B form the interval of an augmented sixth, and adding the F makes it an Italian augmented sixth. The French and German aug6th chords would ...


1

It is indeed a tritone sub of V. I hear it as a G9(b5) with the root (G) replaced by the b5 (Db). So as a chord with root Db it is a Db7/#5, as already pointed out in the other answers. Since it is a tritone sub I wouldn't look at it as "borrowed" from some other mode. Possible scales to play over it are the whole tone scale (of course the one including a G ...


1

This chord could be named Db7(5+)/B (Db7(5+) with B in the bass). It is a substitute dominant chord (a tritone away from G7, and sharing a tritone with G7 -- that is, F <-> B), altered in its fifth degree, and played in the third inversion (the 7th degree is used in the bass). Its best enharmonic spelling is B-Db-F-A, as Db and A are made to explicitly be ...


5

It's not really in the key but you could call it a Db7#5 since the notes you have can be arranged as Db, F, A, and Cb. It is the simplest name and you could look at it as an altered chord borrowed from the Phrygian mode thus fitting in with resolving to C.


3

A polychord indicates an explicit superimposition of two or more chords, with full voicing, disallowing the omission of any notes. It is usually used to simplify the notation of an otherwise awkward chord symbol [think of Ebm7 over G, which could result in a bulky GMaj7(#9#11b13)], but can also make clear that the composer was thinking specifically about ...


1

The first thing you need to consider is this: What kind of music are you playing? The use of the extended chords differ from genre to genre. If for instance you are playing a Bach song, it would be hard to find an extended chord, unless the 9th,11th or 13th note exists from a previous chord. In Jazz, generally 9th,11th and 13th chords are really common; ...


2

There are two basic rules of thumb for chords. You always want your harmony to reflect your melody so if the melody you are harmonizing has a 9th, 11th, or 13th of the chord you are playing in it it would be easy to use it in a chord. Look for common tones and chromatic movement between chords in a progression that will help lead to other chords in your ...


1

I recommend The Jazz Piano Book by Mark Levine for a fuller explanation of this, but there are some guidelines. In a Western Music context, you can add a 2 or 9 to just about any chord. A true 9th chord also includes the flatted 7th. That chord is most commonly used as a dominant, so a G9 in the key of C, A9 in the key of D, F9 in the key of Bb, etc. The ...


4

I wasn't clear what your question really was to be honest, but I think you were asking how you create such colourful sounding chords, so I've added that question and I'll try to answer it a little bit here. There are 3 aspects I'd like to talk about, but they both stem from a similar concept of dissonant. When you hear a single tone, what your ear is ...


0

The Go can be seen as an A7b9, which also would lead to D/Dm, but without the A, obviously. An F7 does the job, too, but needs particular melody note/s over it to sound convincing. Using a tritone substitution works as well, going from Am through Eb7 to D.


1

I'll explain why why Gdim7 works so well. The notes contained in Gdim7 are G, Bb, Db(C#), and Fb(E). One of the properties of a fully diminished 7th chord is because it is symmetric chord, it can function as a Gdim7, Bbdim7, Dbdim7 (C#dim7), or Fbdim7 (Edim7). Since C# is the leading tone of D major/D minor this chord acts as a dominant chord to the Dm chord ...


-1

All theories are only tools to serve a purpose. Chord theory serves the purposes of systemisation so as to communicate information. There are NO rules in music. One can make any sound and if is pleasant to the performer and his/her audience then throw the rule book into the garbage !


0

JP Doherty has correctly identified the chord. A more mainstreamed naming convention of his answer, however, is DbMsus4+. From my "Understanding Guitar Chords": "Distinguishing between chord quality & interval quality. A symbol specifying chord quality, when necessary, appears directly after the chord name; otherwise the symbol refers to ...


0

Some notation has the - meaning minor chord. Other notation school has - meaning diminished 5th. In that latter school + means an augmented 5th. Abm6/+5 is Abm6(+5) or: A flat minor 6 with an augmented 5th :-)


1

By definition all chords are "complete" if they have 3 or more notes performed at the same time. But depending on how it is used (ie is there a pedal, chords/melody coming from and progressing to etc...) will help you understand its function and therefore can help you in naming it. Function can be thought of as chords that sound at rest or chords that sound ...


2

Dissonances as such aren't much of an issue – resolving a dissonant chord into a consonance to give that consonance a "finality" is one of the most important things in classical harmony. That's not the trouble. Your chord has two other problems though: What's dissonant? Well, as you've written it and intend the "diminished first" to work, the root would ...


10

Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...



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