New answers tagged

4

The second chord is a chromatic passing chord: the bass line is descending (A -> G#) whereas the top line is ascending (A -> B). It doesn't really have a name which describes it properly (CaugMaj7 is a possibility as is Eaug). The third chord is a true C with G in the bass, so again the bass descends (G# -> G) and the top ascends (B -> C). So, viewing the ...


1

Two better ways of muting the low E: If your index finger is fretting a note on the A string then scootch the finger over until it's just barely touching the low E. That mutes the string more ergonomically. Better: learn to play subsets of your strings cleanly. This is what I do. Without any muting at all, I can play chords on the string sets: EAD ADG ...


3

First off, it's an inversion when the lowest sounding note is anything other than the root note of the chord. If you play an A chord with the low E string sounding, then that's an inversion. Second, perhaps in your particular situation and with your guitar, it's hard to notice a difference between letting the low E sound or not when playing an A chord, but ...


0

The basics of Roman Notation is that you first have the key. Eb: Then you have a chord that has its root on a certain scale degree. I, ii, iii, iv, V, VI, vii If the Roman Numerals are in capital letters then it indicates Major chords. Eb: V (Major chord build on the Bb) You also have the indications of whether the chord is diminished or ...


1

Adding to Dom's answer, C#4 SHOULD include C#, E#, G# and F#. Whereas C#sus 4 will only contain C#, F# and G#. That's because the suspension of the 3rd, replaced by the 4th, is why it's a sus. chord. If the composer wants the triad AND the 4th note, it's C#4. As in other answers, by the time we get to numbers larger than 7, we generally inlclude that 7, and ...


2

In Jazz, they usually think the chords in thirds. This means that they will take the root and ascend thirds to find the other notes: C# (1), E# (maj 3), G# (5), B (b7), D# (9 or D b9), F# (11 -or Fx #11), A# (13). So, if you have a C#7 chord and want to play F#, you would mark it as C# 11 and not C# 4. Like Dom said, this chord will also have D# in it. If ...


4

It's actually a very big difference. C♯11 is easily seen as an a extended chord that contains the notes C♯, E♯, G♯, B, (D♯), and F♯ though typically the 3rd (E♯) is omitted due to the clash with the 11th (F♯). C#4 is ambiguous, but most people looking at it would imply it is a C♯sus4 chord spelled C&...


1

Scales are in essence a series of notes a certain amount of intervals / semitones from each other. You can have the semi tones in any place in the scale. You can have various amount of notes in the scale. 8 notes in the scale is common as it represents all the scale degrees. Major Scales have the semitones between the third and fourth scale degrees and the ...


0

In my own experience, I used to think that in order to compose a happy tune, one must stay away from minor chords. This is NOT the case at all. The diatonic 6 chord (in c major, scale degree 6 is pitch A.) One can construct the diatonic chord (a chord that uses only notes that belong to the key one is using) with 'A' as the root (the pitch on which the chord ...


2

Sounds like you need to check any guitar chord charts, and only consider the bottom 4 strings shown. For some it won't be too satisfactory, as often with open chords, the 6th and sometimes 5th strings are not played (usually because that's where the root should be). The voicings may or may not be to your satisfaction, but the chords are playable straight ...


0

The "base" for naming or constructing any chord is the major scale starting on the root of the chord - the note that gives it it's name. This is completely independent of context - a C major chord will consist of C, E and G whether it is acting as the tonic in the key of C major, the bVII of D major or anything else. Get rid of the idea that every note and ...


4

Cm6 is C Eb G A. C minor triad with an added sixth. It's one of the extended chords that doesn't fit into the "pile of thirds" hierarchy, it's not a Cm13 (C Eb G Bb D [F] A) with missing notes! And it's just fine in the key of G. Here's a common, corny even, useage - firmly within a G major tonality.


2

Yes, according to the most common use of such symbols, in popular music and jazz transcriptions, Cm6 would be C minor chord with an added 6th (i.e. a natural A). The figure 6 (written as superscript) can be used to mean a first inversion of a major or minor chord, but that is usually in the context of the so called "roman numeral analisys" of tonal harmony. ...


7

Cm6 is C-Eb-G-A. It's Cminor with an added 6th note. Note that the 6th note is from the major scale and melodic minor ascending scale, not the harmonic or natural minor.


0

If this chord functions as a D chord in the context of the chord changes (ie: progression), then I would write this as either a D13 (#11), or a DMaj13 (#11), both of which are commonly used in jazz. In my experience, a sharp-11 is a more common extension of a Maj 7 chord than a dominant 7, because it simply extends the Major-third/minor-third pattern of ...


0

Bm6/D is your best bet. It's clean, specifies all the notes, and won't encourage anyone reading it to add in extraneous notes. Yes, D(#4add6) is probably as good as you're going to get if you're insisting on D being the root. If there was also a C# in there, no one would blink twice at a 13 and #11 in there, but the #4 and 6 are definitely odd without a 7th ...


0

If we consider it a D chord, D (b5) add6 seems to me a more natural way to name this chord, a D major chord with the lowered 5th and the added 6th. But the name of the chord, despite having D in the bass, should consider the harmonic function it is fulfilling. For example, say it is working as a Subdominant in the tonality of F#min, then it would be more ...



Top 50 recent answers are included