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2

Some music stays in a key. It really only uses the 7 notes diatonic to that key. Some music stays in a key for a while, but then modulates to another key. Then it might modulate to another one (that would be literally multiple key changes). Some music has a clear root note (tonic), but uses notes and chords outside of a seven-note scale built on the tonic ...


1

You asked: A major scale is made up of 8 notes right? Really it's just seven notes, unless you add the repeat of the tonic (first pitch) at the end, at an octave higher. And its obvious to me playing sharps/flats over a song in the key of C major doesn't sound very pleasant. You'll soon learn that playing outside of the key can sound quite ...


2

First of all, it's not changing key, it's just using chords not strictly in the key. You're allowed to deviate from the 7 notes that are strictly in key, only extremely boring music doesn't. Second, your chords are a little off. The first one is B minor, not D major. The second is A minor, not C major. It's a little noisy so it's hard to hear, but ...


6

This might be called a Bm(add11) or Bm(sus4), because if you're playing it like so: 7 9 9 9 7 7 (which is a common barre form for adding the 4th above the chord's root), you won't have the third of the chord. On the other hand, if it's like this: x 2 4 4 3 0 then like Dom says, it is a Bm(add11).


3

It's just a Bmadd11 since you're just adding a fourth(aka an 11th) to the chord.


-1

The Eb more typically comes at the top. I hear it much more as a flattened third than a sharpened 9th, so I prefer to label it C7(b10). People who want every chord to be built out of a pile of thirds may strongly disagree :-)


2

It is just convention. If you want, can find arguments for both symbols #9 or b10. For this reason I also think that arguments trying to show that one of the two is "wrong" are rather beside the point. One pragmatic reason to stick to #9 would just be because it's much more common, at least in the Anglo-Saxon world. But to give an example for b10: I live in ...


1

Andrais, even with the flat 7, I still think the effect is one of augmentation or suspension. When I see this chord used, it is over a major sonority, usually. You can skip the #9 (with all its excitement) and play the major chord without doing violence to the harmony. Try to substitute a minor triad only (without the major third) and it likely will not ...


6

It's because how we build chords. The most typical way to build chords is in thirds thus when we name intervals with respect to a chord we use odd intervals to represent them. Also note a 10th reduces to a 3rd which is one of the basic building blocks of chords. It doesn't make sense espically from a functional standpoint to have two thirds in a chord.


7

While most pop and jazz musicians would call this chord a ♯9 chord of some sort, classical people may say that the chord has split thirds, and a theory professor would say that the chord is the pitch class set [0,3,4,7]. There are a lot of ways to rationalize this chord, and any of these would be acceptable depending on who you speak to. If you're just ...


3

When you swap the G for the E, you get rid of a perfect 5th and get a major 3rd. That 5th is being played anyway on fret 5, D string. You end up with: Root Minor 3rd Major 3rd Perfect 5th If you want to see it strictly as a minor C chord, the E is a major 10th tension. This tension is not diatonic to any minor mode from the major scale, so it is an ...


4

Putting in the b7 as well makes it what is affectionately known as the Hendrix chord - 7#9. He didn't invent it - just loved using it. It sounds like the major and minor third are played within the same chord, but technically it's written as a #9. Usually 9ths will incorporate a 7th as well.In this case, a flat 7th. Without the 7th, it'll be, as already ...


17

I'd call it a Cadd#9 and there's a few reasons why. First of all if you think about the chord in terms of extensions a #9 is rather common and if you added a Bb to the chord you described people would hands down call that a C7#9 which is a common altered dominant chord. Second in general when naming chords we typically like to compare the notes to the ...


5

I usually use this chord as an upper structure of a D13(b9) chord: (D) C Eb F# B Used in that way, it is an altered dominant chord. It could also be the upper structure of an Ab7(#9) chord: (Ab) C Eb Gb B Of course, this is also an altered dominant chord. But it can also function as a chord in its own right, i.e. not only as an upper structure. In that ...


2

There have been literally hundreds of alternate tunings, used to play music on a six string guitar. They are now called "alternate" tunings because there is a commonly accepted "standard" tuning for 6 string guitar that we are all familiar with. So anything that deviates from "standard tuning" is now referred to as an "alternate tuning". Many of the ...


2

Beyond the most common tunings, there isn't a hard and fast classification system. I would just generally call the tuning you give in the question as an "open tuning" as it relates to an open chord. Slide guitarists often use this kind of terminology referring to open C or open G tunings. In some older guitar music it was customary to give the tuning up ...


0

YES, but if you RE-NAME the C as B#. Yes B# is the enharmonic equivalent of C. But because the C is assigned to C# we have to bump up the B to take the place of the C. It's a linguistic wordplay game but it is necessary for the rules of the game we have chosen to play. examples: C#maj7 = C# E# G# B# A#m(add9) = A# C# E# B# F#maj7#11 = F# A# C# E# B# ...


0

The chord could have a Chromatic non chordal note that has a C#. If say for argument sake we are G Major and we go from IV to V we may have a non chord note that forms the baseline C-C#-D


1

Following the two excellent answers, Im7 can be used in place of I7, leading, as it usually does to IV. As in C - Cm7 - F. The Cm7 can come over as Eb6, but by keeping the root at the bottom, it works as a dominant of F. Example found in 'The Lady Is a Tramp'. That change from C to seemingly a non-diatonic chord a minor third above can appear subtle and 'in ...


6

Casey's answer is fundamental and should be thoroughly understood. When you're ready to go farther afield, you can use other closely-related minor 7th chords. Consider this chord progression: I-I7-IV-V7-I. The I7 is a "secondary dominant", the "V7 of the IV" chord. It gives a stronger feeling of "fourness" to the IV chord. Now, if you wanted to more ...


4

Minor seventh chords can typically be substituted whenever adding a diatonic 7th (the 7th that is within the current key) to a minor triad leads to a minor seventh. In a major key, this occurs for ii7, iii7 and vi7. In a minor key, this occurs for i7, vi7 and v7. So for instance, if you have a chord progression, like I-iii-vi-ii-V, you could add 7th to ...


0

Need to recognize the difference between a triad sus4 and a dominant 7th sus 4: Csus4 = C F G C7sus4 = C F Bb D So in the book it's a typo, should be "C7sus4"


0

Or Dm7/G. Beware of G11. It's often used as a rough shorthand for F/G. If it matters to you whether the D is included or not, say so by writing F/G or Dm7/G. Think Plagal cadance with a dominant root.


0

Be careful with using CM for C major. In Inkpen, a popular font with users of the Sibelius score-publishing program, lower-case letters are merely small versions of upper-case ones, so CM could easily be confused with Cm. Use Cmaj7 or C^.


4

There are no chords called C1, C2, C3, or C4. In the tab the author just means different versions (voicings) of a C chord; he could as well have called them C_A, C_B, etc. One of those voicings is actually a Cadd9 chord (from low to high): x 3 2 0 3 3 (the note on the third fret of the b string is a D, i.e. the 9th of C). Note that this chord is different ...


2

A standard triad with a bass note a tone higher than the root is often called an 11th.(Off the bass note name). Bb, D and F make up a Bb major triad, and the C is a tone above Bb. So it can be known as C11. The intro to 'Midnight at the Oasis' uses 5 of these 11th chords. Otherwise known as Bb/C, but, as the others have said, it's not a sus4 in its common ...


0

These four notes don't make a sus4 chord, and certainly not a Csus4 chord. If you leave out the D, the other notes make an Fsus4. No other sus4 chords can be made from these four notes. However, like all sus4 chords, the three notes used for Fsus4 (F, Bb, C) can also be thought of as two other suspended chords: these are Bbsus2 and an incomplete C7sus4 (it ...


2

It is a sus4 chord I would not call it a Csus4 though. It's obviously an extension with a suspended third. I would instead call it a C9sus4 because you have everything up to the 9th (it's ok to omit the 5th) and the 3rd is suspended.


7

No, the 7th and 9th are not vital to a sus4 chord. A "regular" sus4 would just have root, fourth, and fifth (so C, F, G, in this case). That said, jazz seems to never play simple "regular" chords without adding at least a 7th. But the chord you have listed could probably be more accurately described as a C9sus4 (without the 5th, if you want to get really ...


3

The question whether Cm7 can be considered a dominant chord has already been answered (the answer is: no). But now for the chord scales. Any scale containing a Cm7 chord can function as a chord scale for Cm7: C dorian: C D Eb F G A Bb C aeolian: C D Eb F G Ab Bb C phrygian: C Db Eb F G Ab Bb The difference is the number of avoid notes that these scales ...


3

It's definitely not dominant because you don't have a diminished triad between the 3rd, 5th, and 7th so it can't function as dominant. If you break it up, you actually get a minor triad between the root, 3rd, and 5th and a major triad between the 3rd, 5th, and 7th. It is just a minor 7th found in a few different scales/modes pretty much any natural mode ...


0

If you limit the case in a modern jazz world, I believe you can consider "loosely dominant" a minor seventh chord if you establish its "tonic" a fifth below. For example in a dorian mode. This one is the first proper mode for a minor seventh chord.



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