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1

There are some common ones that will crop up again and again in almost all pop genres and I hear these in house quite a lot: (these are in Am or C for simplicity) C | G | Am | F Am | F | C | G C | G | Em | F F | G | Am | Am Am | C | Em | D By examination you can see the general theme is using C, Am, and F. 1, 3, 6 or 1, 4, 6 in the case of C progressions. ...


1

Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...


1

It's very likely that the mode that Janam Janam uses is very much like the West's Phrygian mode, which features a flat second degree (B♭ in this case), which acts as an upper leading tone to the tonic. It would be common to set such a leading tone with ♭II (B♭ major in this case) or ♭vii6 (G minor in first inversion). It's also quite common with minor-like ...


-1

If you finger pick for example you can use your regular dominant seventh shapes and just not play the string which is the fifth in your shape. You can pick these notes together or you can roll your chords. So for instance in your open E dominant seventh chord which looks like this. Th fifth of E7 is the B. SO you can just omit those notes from your chord. ...


2

As an addition to Tim's answer, the two most common guitar voicings for dominant seventh chords with the fifth omitted and the root as the lowest note are (e.g., for C7, from low to high E string): 8 X 8 9 X X and X 3 2 3 X X Since you mute three out of the six strings, these shapes can be shifted. They are very common in a blues and jazz context. They ...


2

The fifth of a chord can safely be dropped in any inversion. The fifth of a chord (perfect fifth) is always going to be the same note in reference to the root. Thus, root=A, means P5=E. It can't matter when there is a different voicing, as P5 will always be the same note in the same key. It has been said of a dominant chord on guitar that the 3 (C#) and b7 ...



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