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4

Usually, polychords are written like this: (with a fraction). So, let's say you have Am {fraction} G7 and we are in the C major scale. You could symbolize that as VIm {fraction} V. Notice that for the polychords, there is no slash, but a fraction. Slashes are for the slash chords or hybrid chords (inversions). For the slash chords inversions, if the ...


1

But the C7 (or any 7 chord) is based off of the major scale. It's the V degree of the major scale. So for C major, the V is G7. This is because the V is the only degree that has a major 3rd but a minor 7th. The 7 chord is also known as a dominant chord (so the V degree is known as the dominant of the scale). Based on the phrasing of your question ("the 7th ...


4

The most correct notation for a C7 chord would be C E G Bb and not C E G A#. Note that both Bb and A# are practically the same, but A is the 6th of C whereas B is the 7th of C. Those notes that sound the same but are written different are called Enharmonic notes. So, if you had a chord with these notes: C E A#, then that would be a C augmented sixth chord, ...


1

Use only the major scale as a datum point. As there are different minor scales, it will confuse the issue. Count up using sequential letter names to arrive at the right name. This will put the note on the correct line or space. For example, a major third above A#. A,B,C. Thus it's a C.Because A# key has loads of #s, the C will have to be Cx (C##).Yes, it's ...


4

One trick you can use is to remove the accidental from your starting note in order to make it a more common major scale, and then add the sharp back to the answer at the very end. I'll use your example: I want a major 3rd above G# Using your method, I know the answer should be some kind of B Whoa, G# Major is a crazy scale! Let's pretend it's just a G G ...


5

I use a simpler method; counting semitones. A major third has 4 semitones. So using your example I would think of A, then count up four semitones (Bb, B, C, C#) landing on C#. Interval, Semitone Count Unison, 0 Minor Second, 1 Major Second, 2 Minor Third, 3 Major Second, 4 Perfect Fourth, 5 Tritone, 6 Perfect Fifth, 7 Minor Sixth, 8 Major Sixth, 9 Minor ...


1

I would advise you not to learn the types of chords like this. You need to understand what it means for a chord to be minor / Major and what it means to be Augmented / Diminished. If you only have notes that are in the scale of the Key then sure there are patterns that arise but no composer is forced to only play notes that are comprised of in the scale. ...


1

I disagree with the previous posters in that I think there are several good arguments with opposite conclusions. One way to look at it is that the name of a note should depend on how it is written. In this example, a Db is b5 (or b12) and a C# is #11, period. This is the standard practice in the world of classical theory. Another way to look at it (which ...


3

I would say that your answer is actually correct and the book is wrong in this case, and let me tell you why. It seems likely that this is a very modern book and that if they would say it is a #11, they wouldn't penalize you for writing the technical correct b5. Chords are based on scales. In a typical 7 note scale scale, you will write the intervals as so: ...


2

If it's a #11 then it must be written as such. As a b12 it doesn't make sense, so the dots cannot be accurate.Otherwise we have anarchy. (Again).If you can make anything of this exercise, then maybe you're past this level!!


15

Adding a b9 to a major 7th chord creates a very dissonant sound because the chord then has two different notes that are a half step away from the root. The resolution would be tricky because the b9 would want to go down a half step and so would the 7th and the root needs to go somewhere. That being said however, I found a few voicing that sound good for it ...



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