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1

To me it sounds like quartal harmony and is non-functional in a traditional tonal way, it also has no strong tonal implications. Probably I would name it F7sus4/G although the chord symbol system is not ideal for such harmony. Bearing in mind that sometimes jazz composers write out the scales/modes rather than chords you could just say Eb pentatonic scale/G ...


2

While melodies usually emphasize chord tones of the harmony, the relationship varies greatly between styles and even from one song to another. For example, some blues solos strictly follow the chord tones of the underlying 12-bar progression, but others stick closer to the tonic center while the harmony changes around it. You could even play a legitimate ...


0

I think a simple theoretical concept that might help bridge the gap here is the notion that a chunk of the melody ITSELF can often be reduced to the arpeggiation of one of the basic chords of the key. If you can spot an arpeggiation of this type, you can harmonize a bunch of melodic notes at once, rather than running the "what chords fit under this note" ...


10

It's an Eb6/9 chord with a G in the bass. A major 6/9 chord is a chord that has the basis of a major triad and has a major 6th and a major 9th(major 2nd) in it without a 7th. The spelling is Eb G Bb C F. The full chord symbol would be Eb6/9/G. Also as a side note, it would be difficult for this chord to function as a dominant as the leading tone of C ...


11

A chord with those five pitches is a Gmaj7(#11). A major-seventh chord has a root, major-third, perfect-fifth and a major-seventh. So, a Gmaj7 chord has the notes G, B, D and F#. The fifth (D) would often be left out of this chord, without affecting the overall sound much, or the naming of this chord type. This article about extended (tertian) chords points ...


5

As you said, the first four chords can be understood as chords from E mixolydian. Note that from then on the chords follow a downward movement in minor thirds (at least enharmonically): E => C# => A#/Bb => G and from there to B, the V of E. The downward movement in minor thirds is equivalent to going from a minor scale to its relative major scale (and that's ...


2

Power chords and shell chords both serve a similar function. A power chord strips a triad down to the root and fifth; a shell chord uses the root, seventh, and sometimes the third. Power chords and shell chords both sacrifice some of the chords’ character but still drive the chord progression. They simplify the harmony, which has a couple of major benefits: ...


1

A "power chord" under this name is used for distortion play, period. If you have frequencies f and its harmonics, and 3/2f and its harmonics, the intermodulation frequencies are all multiples of f/2. So that basically means that the harmonics "hint" at a fundamental frequency of f/2 which is in line with the bass note of the power chord. Organs do have ...


2

In the middle ages and before that, they used a system of tuning called Pythagorean tuning (as opposed to 12 tone equal temperament which we use today). This basically meant that you tuned with a stack of fifths until you got 12 notes (and moved the octaves around), as opposed to equally spacing them out. This meant that there were really nice fifths, but ...


3

I would venture that ONE of the functions of a power chord is to provide an open melodic soloing space. I recall an interview with Eric Johnson in which he referred to fifth/power chords as "open chords" -- meaning that the soloing space over the chord was unrestricted. That was a different perspective than I had ever used for that terminology(*). I concede ...


11

Like you and others said, the main reason of using power chords is to avoid the intermodulation distortion: Thirds sound muddy with distortion. I think that they generally have two functions in rock music. One function is to use it as a substitute for a triad. Here, the third is generally implied. But it may be played by a solo guitar or sung by the ...


2

I think they do evoke an emotion, which is quite hard to describe .. I wish I could remember the song but there's a solo in said tune where a fiddle player plays a power chord for a bar or two. It's an american folk/country song- the power chord shines right through everything, even though it's not that loud. The rest of the fiddle solo involves a lot of ...


6

Bagpipes come close, even though their drones are at a pitch and its octave. The harmonics come into play here (pun intended), because every instrument produces not only the fundamental note that we think we hear, but some/lots of others too.Each instrument will have particular overtones, partials or harmonics that it will produce in different proportions. ...


2

OK, here's the real answer, which hardly any theory texts explain properly and I only learnt when doing special studies in microtonality at music school. Western harmony is derived from what Harry Partch called the five limit. You get your triadic chords by making intervals with fractions that have a denominator of less than five. Just tuned intervals ...


3

There is one overarching reason it's not a G11 chord, and that's because it's missing the third. You need to have a major 3rd and flat 7 in there for it to be any part of the G dominant family, those are the defining notes. So G7, G9, G11, G13, none of those can be voiced missing the B or F, no matter what. After that point, it's arguing enharmonics as to ...


-3

I'd say forget the all-to-common fetishistic obsession over forcing notes into extended chords and just label what's there: As has been written already, F6/G. Dm7/G is also possible. The context of the notes during and preceding it will influence how it's perceived by a listener. There's no 3rd (B or Bb) for it to be a G and that influences the G's reign ...


2

First, I would say G9sus4. To simplify or leave it open to interpretation (depending on the context), Gsus. I've seen it written as F/G, is technically correct (or F6/G in your case). If it should be helpful for a player like you said, then use Gsus, IMO. update Maybe F/G (or F6/G) is not technically correct, because it's not an inversion. But I believe ...


4

F6/G is one choice.G9sus4 is another. And because Dm7 has exactly the same 4 notes as F6, Dm7/G is another.As the piece is in C, any would do, although it would be helpful if the name it used was a V of the next chord. (Cycle of 4ths/5ths).


10

It would be a G9sus4. It could technically also be F6/9/G but that would look very confusing on a lead sheet. When naming a chord you have to look at what you have and what you are missing. You have the notes G F A C D. While there is an F major triad, having a G as the bass doesn't make it feel like a chord based off F major because it is rare to put a ...


1

I'm writing them in a spreadsheet. So far so good but it's far from complete. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1AL18KVDIsJvRTpW567dVlJRfrORWA9k_sh6rBYqu5lc/edit?usp=sharing


2

Falling back on the limiting definition of a "note" as any discrete frequency that can be detected, then the largest theoretical chord is a computer synthesizing noise. (The phase relationships between frequencies must change with time for as long as the "chord" is sounding; fixed phase relations create wave interference, reducing the volume of some specific ...


3

I suppose you're asking about what the largest named chord is. You can have a chord with as many pitches as you like, across the whole range of the instruments playing that chord, and of course even more if you are using quarter-tones and micro-tones (as you say in your question). However, as you also say, the largest number of different pitches you could ...



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