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3

This is a tough question. [0,2,6] probably isn't what you're looking for, but I believe is the best way to address it. It's going to sound like an F7(4 2), but is certainly not written that way. It could resolve to E, as F7 can be a tritone substitution for B7 in terms of function. To support this, both D# and F could resolve to E (upward and downward, ...


2

Not every set of notes yields a nice, clean chord name just stacking in thirds. Sometimes it is necessary to rearrange the notes to see how they fit better especially since there are no chords that are contain a diminished 3rd. If you rearrange the letters like so: F A _ D#/Eb You get and F7 like others have stated. The full name would be F7/D#. If ...


2

I would interpret this as an F7 chord with the 5 missing. If you respell the D# as Eb, it will make more sense. In my experience I have never encountered a diminished third as a definitive chord voicing.


1

It'll SOUND like a dominant 7th , although technically it won't be called that. As we are aware, the 5th of a chord is one that can be left out.


0

If your world view contains a system of harmony that tells you what you MAY do, you'd better follow its rules. If it contains one that attempts to describe what IS done, work out what you mean by such a notation. If you have a reasonable answer, it's good!


2

Spacing ("voicing") a chord like that makes the interval between the topmost "seventh" and the melody note a semitone, also called a minor second. A different spacing would change that to a major seventh. Minor seconds sound harsher than major sevenths, because the notes of a minor second usually occupy the same psychoacoustic critical band. That's why, ...


4

Even if the b2 interval mentioned in Dan Davis's answer is avoided by using a different voicing, the problem that is usually meant in this context is the b9 interval between the major 7th and the (higher) root note. The b9 interval is considered a very dissonant interval which in traditional jazz harmony is only "allowed" on a dominant seventh chord ...


3

It looks like that bit of information has been in the article since it was written. From the original 2005 article: Often the melody note or other pitched phenomena influences which of the above chord types a performer selects. For example, if the melody note is the root of the chord, including a major seventh can frequently cause a harsh dissonance. I ...


1

Intervals measure the difference between two pitches. They make sense in a melody (one pitch at a time) as well as within a chord (pitches played at the same time). C, E and G are three notes. If they are played at the same time, we can call it a chord. Chords are named depending on context, but a simple name for this C-E-G would be C Major. In a C Major ...


2

It's important to realize that there are two basic flavors of that chord: the first being the "Hendrix chord", which acts as a I chord, i.e. you use an E7/#9 in a song that is in E (like Purple Haze). Here, you can't use an altered 5th, because this would take away the stability necessary for the I chord. You could use a perfect fifth though (but I've never ...


0

A #9 chord does not mandate an altered 5th. You can get 13th or a b13 (and #9b13 sounds great with a perfect 5th, you'll generally throw in a #11 with it). For a basic #9 chord, a possible mode is the diminished scale, starting with a half step. You can check that this includes a perfect 5th, a #11 and a 13 (unaltered).


4

You have to remember the full chord is an E7#9 meaning that the chord is a E7 with an added #9. The notes of the E7 are standard unless otherwise stated. It is an altered chord because we're adding a #9 which is considered altered tone because we are taking the natural 9 and raising it or altering it to get the sound we want. However just because the 9th is ...


0

Because a b10 = b3 which implies a minor third is used, excluding the major 3rd. But designating a #9 means a major third is also a part of the chord. Together with the minor 7th this is the way to designate a dominant chord with an altered tone.


0

Whenever I suggest the "Spinning Wheel" or "Hendrix" chord sounds a lot more like a flattened third on top of a dominant 7th structure than like a sharpened anything, I am shouted down by supporters of "pile of thirds" orthodoxy. They'll let me have a C6 chord though. So the only answer I can offer is that it's a religious thing.


0

Lets see what exactly is a dominant seventh. It a is a chord which instead of three notes with one of the notes being doubled we have four different notes. So instead of having four notes being C-E-G-C we have C-E-G-B. The seventh chord is a tetrad (Triad but four notes instead of four) Now you could build chords with this added note on any scale degree. ...


0

Shevliaskovic and Tim are both right I just want to point something very important about how chords work in general. Because we build chords in thirds and we consider triads (3 note chords) to be the basic unit of a chord, the more notes you have the more triads you can break them into. For example the E♭Maj7 is spelled: E♭ G B♭ D We can make two ...


1

I find it a bit depressing to see a lot of questions refer to a musical situation as "acceptable" or even "Correct". I think there are three ways of going about making music: 1) Classical/formal training: Learn to play (often amazing) pieces of music written on a page. I've never done this so I'm not going to say too much about it, but having played with a ...


-3

Yes. Some said it depends on how you arrange the notes. Wrong. It depends on which note you have in the bass. Play a low C with your left hand and you will hear C6. Play a A and you will hear Amin7, no matter how you arrange notes in your right hand


0

There is nothing wrong; it is the order of things. Teenagers find out that driving (and love) is not what they learned in school. College kids find out that their degrees do (and don't) prepare them for their careers. Parents find out that despite all the books, they just sort of make it up as they go along and hope for the best. Music students find out ...


3

From a classical training on piano, where no teacher actually explained that the scales I had to learn would be useful - they were merely something I would have to play in the exam, to realising, 30 years later, that they were in fact the basic formula from which a tune in a particular key could be made. It was long, hard journey, but for many years now, I ...


2

What are we doing wrong? Sounds like teaching theory more than actual pieces. If we never taught theory there would be no concept of key, scale, or chord in a limiting or structural sense. If we taught mostly pieces that challenge (or flat-out reject) typical western music theory and structure, then there would be less of a perception of the theory as being ...


0

Edit: Answering as a student rather than an educator. The biggest factor for me was starting with and focusing on only classical music for years. This "play what's on the page, as perfectly as possible" and a focus on the key signature instructing what "valid" notes are led to my personal conclusion that you must perform in key and block out notes that ...


0

I would like to answer this as a music student who has studied harmony, modern harmony and counterpoint for the last years and I find myself asking the same question as well as others in the same context. I have yet to see a theory method that focuses on the creation of the melody, rather than its harmonization. Also, minimum and untimely attention is given ...


10

It depends on how you arrange the notes in a chord. The answer is yes, but not on all chords. If you play a C major chord with a major 6th, you have: C,E,G,A. This is a major chord. You can rearrange it to create an Am7 chord, if you put the A as the lowest note: A,C,E,G which is a minor 7th chord. So, in your case, you can read your chord as Gm add b13 ...


2

The 13th in a minor chord becomes a 5th when it's flattened. So it reverts in sound to a component of the normal triad.; Thus the chord doesn't really exist. It is Ebmaj7, as you state. Taking D6th notes and swapping them around produces Bm7, so the answer can be 'yes'. At a tangent, the Hendrix chord, say, E7#9 could be construed as both a major and ...


1

This is called comping. You play the same chord in different positions. It creates movement and exhibits the whole range of the instruments while in some cases it generates interesting voicings like your Gsus. It sounds cool and its the dirty job of a guitarist.


1

I don't think that there's a specific name for such a progression. You basically repeat a chord in different inversions. However, the way I hear the second chord (with A in the bass) is not as a version of G. Of course you can call it Gsus2, but the question is if you hear it as a Gsus2. I don't because the 2 in the bass (A) is quite uncommon and suggests ...


0

Slash chords could be what you mean. It's a way of describing a chord with a note other than the root at the bottom. Common are G/B and G/D, which are G chords with B and D as the lowest note respectively. Otherwise called 1st and 2nd inversions. When A is underneath the chord is G add 2 or sometimes G sus 2, if B is absent, and here is written G/A. If there ...


0

You're right that m6 is G-Bb-D-E. It's a bit of a misnomer, but it is a minor triad with a major 6th note added. So I, bIII V VI. The addition of the proper m6 interval clashes with the V, but could be called mb6.It's more commonly found as Ebmaj7, though, and in the order shown would be the 1st inversion - not sounding as good as the root.Sometimes on ...


5

You should name it Eb maj7 because that's what it actually is. If the lowest note is G, then it is just the first inversion of Eb maj7.


3

Some music stays in a key. It really only uses the 7 notes diatonic to that key. Some music stays in a key for a while, but then modulates to another key. Then it might modulate to another one (that would be literally multiple key changes). Some music has a clear root note (tonic), but uses notes and chords outside of a seven-note scale built on the tonic ...


1

You asked: A major scale is made up of 8 notes right? Really it's just seven notes, unless you add the repeat of the tonic (first pitch) at the end, at an octave higher. And its obvious to me playing sharps/flats over a song in the key of C major doesn't sound very pleasant. You'll soon learn that playing outside of the key can sound quite ...


2

First of all, it's not changing key, it's just using chords not strictly in the key. You're allowed to deviate from the 7 notes that are strictly in key, only extremely boring music doesn't. Second, your chords are a little off. The first one is B minor, not D major. The second is A minor, not C major. It's a little noisy so it's hard to hear, but ...


7

This might be called a Bm(add11) or Bm(sus4), because if you're playing it like so: 7 9 9 9 7 7 (which is a common barre form for adding the 4th above the chord's root), you won't have the third of the chord. On the other hand, if it's like this: x 2 4 4 3 0 then like Dom says, it is a Bm(add11).


3

It's just a Bmadd11 since you're just adding a fourth(aka an 11th) to the chord.



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