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1

Others mentioned the possible confusion with note names. And indeed, in some German songbooks (like the 1909 "Zupfgeigenhansel") you might find Cv instead of Cdim (v for vermindert), with v not being in competition with a note name.


4

M cannot be confused with the letter name of a note, whereas D and A can. The + is probably due to the interval (usually 5th) being larger than original by a semitone. That being the case, dim could be -, but that is sometimes used to denote minor , NNS uses it. Why o, not a clue! There isn't even an o in the word!


2

Major edit after OP's clarification I'm pulling nomenclature from a paper written by Myles Skinner, a microtonal community wiki, and Wikipedia. I'll refer to quarter tone intervals as decimals between the semitone intervals. 3.5 is pretty universally called a neutral third. That's from all three of the sources and personal experience. It's a good ...


1

The root of the problem is : how to name chords with quarter tones? I myself have no idea how, to my knowledge quarter tones are either central to a style where chords are second-class citizens at best (indian music) or assigned to either major or minor context at a given time (blue notes). So if you're using classic western harmony, as you seem to consider ...


3

The diminished chord has the function of a dominant chord and wants to go back to the tonic chord (the I chord). For example in the key of C major, Bo would want to go to C. If you're familiar with the concept of the dominant 7th chord (V7) this should make sense as the dominant 7th chord also goes to the tonic the diminished triad is contained within the ...


1

I believe this is exactly what BBNG makes use of in their song CS60 on the first chord when the melody comes in. It sounds to me like an Ab major7 (b9) than then resolves down to the root, G minor and continues to Eb and then basically D minor (the diatonic VI and v respectively). The melody notes go from b9 to major 7 and it works really well in giving it ...


2

It should be mentioned that throughout the whole book there are three occurrences of the statement that triads sound stronger/strongest in second inversion: Ex. 1 Ex. 2 Ex. 3 If you look at the context in each of these cases you'll see that Levine always talks about slash chords. In Ex. 1 he talks about a Gsus4 (actually G9sus4) voiced as a F/G chord, ...


2

In general, when we say 2nd inversion we mean that the 5th of the chord is in the bass. However, the author is treating these slash chords as independent major chords superimposed over a C bass note. These particular chords are the ones in 2nd inversion regardless of the C note in the bass. Moreover, in "close chord position" or "keyboard style" such as in ...


2

When Levine refers to a chord as being "stronger" is can also be read as "more stable", as in harmonically stable. Take the C Major Triad as an example (C, E, G). If you analyze what the intervals are for each inversion (first and second) you can see the following: First inversion; E is root under G and C E,G = m3 E,C = m6 G,C = P4 Second inversion; G is ...


0

A minor 2nd interval (two notes that are one half-step apart) is used in the chord. Minor 2nds generally sound dissonant and not very good. On a piano, try playing B and C or F and F# together. The major seventh chord doesn't sound quite as dissonant as this because the B and C are in different octaves, but it's definitely not as pleasing as a regular ...


6

The answer is actually quite simple: it's called a double-diminished triad. Played in first inversion it's usually referred to as Italian augmented sixth chord. As mentioned in other answers, our ears have a tendency to hear it as a dominant seventh sound.


1

By analogy with Why does the C7 chord on guitar omit the G note (5th) in open position? this chord could perfectly acceptably be named as an F7 (no 5th.) As others have said, Eb F A is going to sound like an F7, and the chord shape discussed in the question I have linked shows there is indeed a precedence set for naming chords like this as 7ths. Many ...


4

A D# chord like this could never occur in any scale degree of a major or minor scale with the #d note as a root so there would be no need to name it with reference to the #d. However this notes could occur together, for example in a B7b5 chord without the root (b). Since music theory doesn't care for something that could only happen outside a harmonic ...


6

This is a tough question. [0,2,6] probably isn't what you're looking for, but I believe is the best way to address it. It's going to sound like an F7(4 2), but is certainly not written that way. It could resolve to E, as F7 can be a tritone substitution for B7 in terms of function. To support this, both D# and F could resolve to E (upward and downward, ...


3

Not every set of notes yields a nice, clean chord name just stacking in thirds. Sometimes it is necessary to rearrange the notes to see how they fit better especially since there are no chords that are contain a diminished 3rd. If you rearrange the letters like so: F A _ D#/Eb You get and F7 like others have stated. The full name would be F/D#. If you ...


3

I would interpret this as an F7 chord with the 5 missing. If you respell the D# as Eb, it will make more sense. In my experience I have never encountered a diminished third as a definitive chord voicing.


1

It'll SOUND like a dominant 7th , although technically it won't be called that. As we are aware, the 5th of a chord is one that can be left out.


0

If your world view contains a system of harmony that tells you what you MAY do, you'd better follow its rules. If it contains one that attempts to describe what IS done, work out what you mean by such a notation. If you have a reasonable answer, it's good!


2

Spacing ("voicing") a chord like that makes the interval between the topmost "seventh" and the melody note a semitone, also called a minor second. A different spacing would change that to a major seventh. Minor seconds sound harsher than major sevenths, because the notes of a minor second usually occupy the same psychoacoustic critical band. That's why, ...


4

Even if the b2 interval mentioned in Dan Davis's answer is avoided by using a different voicing, the problem that is usually meant in this context is the b9 interval between the major 7th and the (higher) root note. The b9 interval is considered a very dissonant interval which in traditional jazz harmony is only "allowed" on a dominant seventh chord ...


3

It looks like that bit of information has been in the article since it was written. From the original 2005 article: Often the melody note or other pitched phenomena influences which of the above chord types a performer selects. For example, if the melody note is the root of the chord, including a major seventh can frequently cause a harsh dissonance. I ...


1

Intervals measure the difference between two pitches. They make sense in a melody (one pitch at a time) as well as within a chord (pitches played at the same time). C, E and G are three notes. If they are played at the same time, we can call it a chord. Chords are named depending on context, but a simple name for this C-E-G would be C Major. In a C Major ...


2

It's important to realize that there are two basic flavors of that chord: the first being the "Hendrix chord", which acts as a I chord, i.e. you use an E7/#9 in a song that is in E (like Purple Haze). Here, you can't use an altered 5th, because this would take away the stability necessary for the I chord. You could use a perfect fifth though (but I've never ...


0

A #9 chord does not mandate an altered 5th. You can get 13th or a b13 (and #9b13 sounds great with a perfect 5th, you'll generally throw in a #11 with it). For a basic #9 chord, a possible mode is the diminished scale, starting with a half step. You can check that this includes a perfect 5th, a #11 and a 13 (unaltered).


4

You have to remember the full chord is an E7#9 meaning that the chord is a E7 with an added #9. The notes of the E7 are standard unless otherwise stated. It is an altered chord because we're adding a #9 which is considered altered tone because we are taking the natural 9 and raising it or altering it to get the sound we want. However just because the 9th is ...



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