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0

Not really. I mean, you could make that, but it's unlikely to sound good without some pretty sophisticated AI. At it's simplest, you could be using any diatonic chord for which the bass note is either the 1st, 5th, or 3rd. But if you step outside really simple pop music, then the bass note could be all kinds of things as many chords are voiced with a bass ...


4

Even though Shevliaskovic's suggestion that this could be an Em9 (no 5) chord is theoretically correct, it is hardly ever used that way. If that voicing were used as an Em9 chord there would be no reason to indicate that the low E string should be muted (note the cross on the low E string). With the note D in the bass, the Em9 chord would have its seventh in ...


2

This could be Em 9 without the 5th, which is a common note to omit, with the 7th on the bass; third inversion. So, if you played it in root position, it would be: E,G, (B which is omitted),D,F#.


2

If you think a minor chord is sad, try a fully-diminished chord. The sadness seems to come from the minor third in its prominent position. A diminished chord has 4 of these, splaying out across the octave, at the nexus, the infinite-point of unresolved wrt to the tonic. C - E♭ - G♭ - A (or B ♭♭ to be more proper). ...


2

This is what I have been taught in High school and university: Theoretically, you can say that G11 is the chord with the notes G, B, D, F, A and C. But in practice, the third (in this case B) should be omitted, because of the dissonance! The 5th (the note D in G11) may be omitted, but not necessarily. So in practice G11 is the same as G9sus4. This is also ...


1

To me it just seems to be saying you take the chord/scale, whatever that happens to be, and any triads you can build from that chord/scale can be used in place of the 7th chord built from its tonic. What type of chords those will be will just depend on the chord/scale. It's really just seems to be a heuristic for voicing the chord/scale.


2

Yeah I'm going to have nightmares tonight. Definitely A is the root, there's no doubting that. That makes E the dominant, which is why the song has strange E chords before A chords - a "V - I" progression. Upon listening to the melody, it seems to me that the notes in the scale are all natural except for that pesky Bb. This means that the major scale for ...


0

The voicings you wrote are two root position chords, specifically V to I, resolving in parallel. This is the absolute most basic way to "voice" these chords and is generally considered cheesy and un-interesting, mostly because the sounds is boring, or maybe too strong of a resolution for the middle of the piece, maybe ok at the end. It is a very flat, ...


4

The point of avoiding certain parallels is not that it would "sound bad". On the contrary, it sounds really good - so good that for centuries, this was the only kind of polyphony anyone ever used. The point is rather that if you want to write a polyphonic piece of music (and that was a radically, heretically new idea at th time), you'd better not lead your ...


6

It depends on what you are trying to do. If you are using the chords as harmonic colour, parallel triads work fine. If you need some independence between the voices, parallel octaves and fifths aren't so good. Both with and without are perfectly acceptable, and have been since the end of the 19th century, provided you accomplish what you are setting out to ...


6

You are right that a chord without a root can usually be interpreted as a different chord, and without any context, nobody can tell which chord is meant. So it is mainly the musical context that identifies the chord. Take as an example a part of a simple blues progression in C: | G7 | F7 | C7 | C7 | If in this progression you replaced the C7 chord by an ...


2

I think you are under some misapprehension of what the word resolve means in a musical context. There is typically only two types of notes that for the first while of your musical education you need to know resolves. The Leading Tone Seventh / Ninths of Chords The leading tone resolves to the Tonic. ALWAYS!. There is some things to consider. If a whole ...


6

Either one, really. It depends on the voice leading to a great extent. (I'm assuming common practice voice leading here.) Let's have a look: The first example holds the common note (G) in the descant, and uses the usual G-C drop in the bass. The neatest place for D to go in such a case is to E; otherwise you're faced with a bare fifths sonority (which can ...


2

You can resolve D in either C or E (or G -- why not?). It doesn't make any difference. Or, it does make a difference, it's just that you have to look at the context to see what fits better. But, there isn't any rule like there is for the leading tone. I mean B most likely will go to C, but D and G can go wherever. This depends on where the note is coming ...



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