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2

Minor 6th chords use the major 6 interval off the root, just like major 6ths. The minor bit is the minor 3rd.A minor 6th chord with a minor 6th interval doesn't sound good. So 13ths will use the same 6th interval, but usually an octave higher.Strictly speaking, a 13th should have 1,3,5,7,9,11 and 13 in it, but that's often impractical - on guitar, for ...


0

A b13 voicing can be exactly the same in sound as a #5 voicing, but it depends on the notes you use in the construction of your voicings. The nomenclatures are different because each implies different notes which can be added to the chord. For example, in the case of a b13 voicing, you could use BOTH the natural fifth and the b13th, but in the case of a #5 ...


2

A pair of notes can belong to many chords. If we say that a pair of notes is a chord it allows the possibility that there may be a third, possibly unheard note that is the root note of the chord. And only the context reveals what that root note might be. For example, imagine hearing a car-horn sounding a minor 3rd. When I hear this I consider the two notes ...


3

I find context is everything with dyads. Within a progression, Db-C could function in a multitude ways. While it could function as a DbMaj7 sans the 3rd, it might also function as a C7(b9), F7b13, Bb-9, Gb7#11, Eb13, Ab11, F#7#11, A7#9, etc. With just two notes, the chords list can get just about endless (especially if you're willing to delve into ...


5

That's a valid voicing of both a B7#9#5 and a B7#9b13 as long as we aren't concerned with the spelling. Jazz musicians often are less concerned with spelling and more concerned with things being easy to sight read at the gig. I (and others, but not everyone) often think of the chord nomenclature as implying things about appropriate scale choices: #5 ...


0

B=root. D# =maj.3rd. G = b6. A = m7. D = m10. There is no b13, as G natural is too soon in the rising note list.Had the G been an F##, then B7#5 is a starter. Then the D on top, which could have been a C##, making #9, could have been B7#5#9. BUT it isn't.As is, it may be called B7b6b10, but that's hardly a common chord name.Someone goofed.


5

Chord nomenclature is dependent on context. Without knowing the context, that chord could have different (and possibly equally correct labels) such as Eb+maj7(#11) (if respelled) or Gadd9(b13) to give a couple of examples. I do not think you are correct in your reasoning - read on! I disagree that interpreting the chord with an F## would imply a G# in any ...


1

Since writing music is an art, there isn't a single answer to your question. The approaches that others have offered are sound. I myself have learned how to write chord progressions in a different way. What I've done is taught myself to improvise on the piano. I'm not particularly great at it, but what it lets me do is quickly try chord progressions and how ...


2

If this were my problem, and I was using an equal-tempered instrument like the piano to accompany Carnatic music, I'd keep it VERY simple. I would try to hear the final note (sa, I think it is called) of the rag and play that as an octave in the bass, then try to add very simple pitches over it, experimenting with the perfect fifth above sa, the perfect ...


0

To determine what any chord is, you should just look at all of the notes played and see what chords they match up to. For a piece in Eb Major, you would start seeing if the chords match Eb Major, or its fifth, Bb Major, or its seventh (as it's a jazz piece) Db Major. For a chord like this, if you just list them in order starting on C, you get C, D, Eb, E, ...


9

One helpful starting point, though you may need to gather some further information to fully comprehend and apply: Within a given key, all notes of the scale can be harmonized by one of three chords while giving a functional harmony. These 3 chords would be the I, IV and V chords of the scale. We can use C Major as an example: C Major Scale: C, D, E, F, ...


3

I disagree with your first statement, Rana. Music composition is indeed a learned behavior. Some people can grasp the fundamentals of composition easier than others, but a lot if not most people who write music put a lot of work into developing the ability to do so. With that out of the way, there are indeed a plethora of options for choosing to harmonize a ...



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