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2

Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


1

A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...


2

C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


8

They're both C major, first inversion, but the voicings differ. The first chord is in close position, the second in open.


35

This is a common misconception about what inversions are. Inversions only consider what the bass (lowest) note is. If the bass note of a chord is the root of the chord, then it is in root position, regardless of how the chord notes are distributed among the upper (non-bass) parts. Similarly, if the lowest note of a chord is the third of the chord, then it is ...


0

In E flat (3 flats) the basic chords will be I Eb, ii Fm, iii Gm, IV Ab, V Bb, vi C, vii Ddim. The same I, ii, iii ... sequence as in C major, but transposed. Some of course can be 7s. Use of the notes will focus attention on the fingering; use of the numerals highlights the sequence.


0

Yes. But it is all key dependent. In E maj. E will be I, E7 = I7. Minors are usually represented with lower case, so Em7 = i7. Are you a little confused with minors and flats? You won't be the first! Love to know why it happens though. As in the other answer, in A maj., E7 is shown as V7, whereas in B maj., E7 shows as IV7. So it will only work for a ...


0

Roman numeral analysis is dependent to the scale you are writing in, while chords are absolute.So, E may be I when writing in E major, but it may as well be III maj in C major. E7 may be I7 in E major, while it may be III 7 in C Major. So, relatively speaking, you can write chords in roman numberals, as long as you define the scale. The very common C - Am - ...


0

Allen Forte, in The Structure of Atonal Music, lists 220 chords or "prime forms". These include all possible collections of chords of three to twelve notes, where transpositions and inversions are treated as instances of the same chord. Consequently, Forte's pc analysis doesn't distinguish between a major and minor triad, for example. Furthermore, notice ...


0

All chords exist. The real question is: What is the conventional name of these chords? How are chords named? Is this a practical chord? Is this the practical way to name this chord? Depending on your motivations for your "motivation" the question could be re-framed. All possible chords have been classified.. probably many times. Look up Set Theory, and ...


2

As with most aspects of music, music theory doesn't offer one single 'correct' way to think of chords. The most commonly-taught way is to start with the triads that are generated from the set of notes in major and minor keys, and then consider other forms as variations on, or substitutions for, those chords. As others have mentioned, there's also an emphasis ...


0

Any two or more notes form a chord. The other answers all have valid points, but the term itself is quite simple — even if it's not necessarily useful in most contexts.


3

A useful "theory" needs to tell you what you can do with a "chord", not just give it a name. For example the idea of "the chord EFGA" doesn't have much significance, until you put it into a musical context like this when you can understand it either as a dominant 13th, or as two passing notes associated with a dominant 7th - whichever you prefer.


1

Chord theory can be approached in two ways: You can try and understand the frequency of each sound (in Hertz) and discover which frequencies are actually harmonious overlaps. This is approaching it from a pure tone / physics side of resonance. You can also approach it in terms of "traditional" theory which is simpler, and closer to what you are getting ...


5

Yes they are both chords, but how useful they would be alone especially in functional harmony is questionable. The first one C, D, E could actually be viewed as a CAdd9 chord without the fifth as the root implies a perfect 5th pretty strongly. The second one will most likely not be used in any tonal harmony due it's extreme dissonance and will not be given ...


1

This can be done, but not all combinations are always useful. Nicolas Slonimsky's "Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns" basically does this. He lists lots of combinations indexed by number of notes.


3

Adding further to the two existing answers, the notes of MODES will fit slightly better than the notes of each major scale. On chord G, obviously, the G scale notes fit best. Still in the KEY of G, but on a D chord, the notes of D Mixolydian are a (slightly) better fit, and on a C chord, the notes from C Lydian likewise. So, what's happening is that on ...


6

I stand with Shevliaskovic on this: You can indeed do what ever you want. Taking your question as written, that is the exact correct response. However, I believe that this is what you really wanted to know: It is true that G Major key has a D Major chord as the dominant (fifth chord of the key), and that D Major key has G Major chord as the sub-dominant ...


6

First of all, since this is your composition, you can do whatever you want. Unless you're going for something very specific, like you want to write your song in a certain style, there are no limits. Go nuts. In your example, I assume you're in the G major key, and you have a D major chord, right? If this is the case, then yes you can freely use the D ...


2

I'd recommend taking a step-by-step approach: Figure out what the notes are. You can't know what chord it is without knowing what notes there are. From top to bottom, the notes are: G♯, E, C♯ (twice) Figure out what chord it is. You can't know what the chord inversion is without knowing what chord it is. There's only one way to arrange the ...


1

An inversion is just determined by what note of the chord is in the bass. Root position has the root in the bass, first inversion has the third in the bass, second has the fifth in the bass, and third has the 7th in the bass. Once you know what chord you are looking at, you know what the root, third, and fifth is. I'm not going to give you the answer to ...


2

In common practice four part harmony the bass note dictates the inversion. So, first identify the chord by the notes that make it: C#-E-G# --> that's C# min, or iii in A Maj. So C# is the root of this chord, and it's in the bass, so it's a root chord. If E was in the bass, it would be 1st inversion (C#6); if G# was in the bass it would be 2nd inversion ...


1

There are some common ones that will crop up again and again in almost all pop genres and I hear these in house quite a lot: (these are in Am or C for simplicity) C | G | Am | F Am | F | C | G C | G | Em | F F | G | Am | Am Am | C | Em | D By examination you can see the general theme is using C, Am, and F. 1, 3, 6 or 1, 4, 6 in the case of C progressions. ...


1

Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...



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