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0

The Go can be seen as an A7b9, which also would lead to D/Dm, but without the A, obviously. An F7 does the job, too, but needs particular melody note/s over it to sound convincing. Using a tritone substitution works as well, going from Am through Eb7 to D.


1

I'll explain why why Gdim7 works so well. The notes contained in Gdim7 are G, Bb, Db(C#), and Fb(E). One of the properties of a fully diminished 7th chord is because it is symmetric chord, it can function as a Gdim7, Bbdim7, Dbdim7 (C#dim7), or Fbdim7 (Edim7). Since C# is the leading tone of D major/D minor this chord acts as a dominant chord to the Dm chord ...


-1

All theories are only tools to serve a purpose. Chord theory serves the purposes of systemisation so as to communicate information. There are NO rules in music. One can make any sound and if is pleasant to the performer and his/her audience then throw the rule book into the garbage !


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JP Doherty has correctly identified the chord. A more mainstreamed naming convention of his answer, however, is DbMsus4+. From my "Understanding Guitar Chords": "Distinguishing between chord quality & interval quality. A symbol specifying chord quality, when necessary, appears directly after the chord name; otherwise the symbol refers to ...


0

Some notation has the - meaning minor chord. Other notation school has - meaning diminished 5th. In that latter school + means an augmented 5th. Abm6/+5 is Abm6(+5) or: A flat minor 6 with an augmented 5th :-)


1

By definition all chords are "complete" if they have 3 or more notes performed at the same time. But depending on how it is used (ie is there a pedal, chords/melody coming from and progressing to etc...) will help you understand its function and therefore can help you in naming it. Function can be thought of as chords that sound at rest or chords that sound ...


2

Dissonances as such aren't much of an issue – resolving a dissonant chord into a consonance to give that consonance a "finality" is one of the most important things in classical harmony. That's not the trouble. Your chord has two other problems though: What's dissonant? Well, as you've written it and intend the "diminished first" to work, the root would ...


10

Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...


0

Good info above, but I think the progression for the jazzy part of the tune is simply this (in E): ('-' == minor, sorry for the jazz shorthand) F#-7 B9 E6 C#-7 F#-7 B9 E6 C#7(#9) Or if you prefer, back in C: D-7 G9 C6 A-7 D-7 G9 C6 A7(#9) This is just a ii-V-I based progression, very common in jazz. The fourth chord prepares to ...


2

I'll address the B F G question first... the simplest way to put these notes into a "common practice" chord is to arrange them with G as the root, i.e. G B (D) F == G7. Try spelling the chord with B or F as the root for comparison! Yuck. Also, it is quite common, when voicing a dominant 7 chord with only three voices, to eliminate the fifth (D in this ...


1

The first one can be E6/9. The instrument it's played on is inconsequential.More to follow.


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Not every group of notes has a name, but with most you can put together some name. Your first unknown E, F#, and G# can be looked at an Eadd9 (thanks Charles). Your last example B, C#, and F# is just a Bsus2. A chord is technically any set of 3 or more notes so technically any group of 3 or more notes is a chord regardless if it seems to be missing ...


1

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...


0

Neutral intervals are usually voiced with the major and the minor simultaneously on chromatic instruments that only have semitones (fretted instruments, most valved winds and keyboards without pitch bending). Eg. an A neutral consists of an A, a C half-sharp (it's the quartertone between C and C#, for the notation imagine the # but with only one vertical ...


1

You are correct that Ab minor must contain a Cb, not any form of B (even though Cb and B are "enharmonically equivalent", Cb is the correct spelling here). However, there are contexts in which two different versions (e.g. sharp and natural) of the same base note can sound together. When this occurs, it is called a "chromatic contradiction," or a False ...


15

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


0

In Neo-Riemannian theory, this relationship is called a Leading Tone Exchange (often abbreviated "L"), and is one of the three fundamental transformations that can be performed to a chord. The other two are Parallel (P) and Relative (R) which are much better known. If you look at the geometric triangle that a chord makes on a Tonnetz map, these three ...


0

There are only 351 possible different chords (strictly chord classes). This is considerably less than the 2047 suggested above because some chords are inversions of others. Fore example C6 has the same notes as Am7. So if you want to know how many different chords there are (counting all As for example as the same note) there are 19 with 3 notes 43 with 4 ...


5

I'm wondering about the second chord here, FABD. What exactly is this chord? In root inversion, the chord would be written BDFA. It consists of root, m3, d5, m7. Since the 5th is diminished but the 7th isn't (otherwise it would be an A♭, as you note), this chord is called a B half-diminished seventh chord. It is notated as Bm7♭5 ("B minor-7 flat-5") or ...



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