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15

Is this handwritten or printed? Is the notation of German origin? In German, the notes E flat and A flat are called Es and As.


9

Yes it is the dominant chord. The third is sharpened to G# to make a major chord, which gives a stronger cadence when moving V-i. This is why the Harmonic Minor has a sharpened seventh degree, to create the sharpened third in the dominant chord (or leading note in the scale, whichever way you want to think about it). In common-practice harmony, the strong, ...


7

I agree that it's probably a sus4 chord, but if it's hand-written, could the "s" possibly be a "5" and it's a power chord? Only other kind of far-out thought...


6

After doing a little bit of digging, I found a source* that uses the s instead of the full sus symbol to notate a suspended chord. They always put the number next to it, but a sus alone indicates a sus4 so I would imagine that they would be equivalent. I would still like to see the context just to be sure but I think it is pretty likely. * I don't really ...


5

The point of any dominant chord is to lead back to the tonic chord. The best way to do this is by using the leading tone (Natural 7th in major, raised 7th in minor). Because of how the natural minor scale is formulated, the leading tone is omitted from the scale. This however does not change the fact that the leading tone gives a very strong pull to the ...


5

It is correct to a certain extent. You are absolutely right that the 'natural' A minor scale has no sharps in it, and the v chord would be an E minor. However, minor scales come in several 'flavors'. There is the natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor. The harmonic minor is the same as the minor scale with the 7th raised by a semi-tone. Ergo, ...


4

Could it maybe be German (or Dutch)? Because in this case it would mean Eb and Ab (i.e. E flat and A flat). And in this case 'Es' would refer to an Eb major triad, and 'As' refers to an Ab major triad.


4

There is nothing really complicated about these chords. What I think is throwing you off is that some of the chords are missing 5ths and some notes are above the staff. Here is the basic analysis of the chords broken down by measure: C | D7 Em | Am7/G Em/B | F#m/A Gmaj7sus2/A | C/G D/F# | C | C5/G Em/B | F#/A Gmaj7sus2/A | C/G ...


4

When people refer to a “minor scale”, they don’t always think of the natural minor scale. Quite often, they think of the harmonic minor scale, which is similar to the natural scale with the seventh degree raised by a semitone. As the seventh degree is the third of the dominant chord, the dominant chord is major in harmonic minor scales. For example, the A ...


4

What I think fits perfectly here is that you are on the G major scale and you borrow a chord from the G minor scale. The chords G major and A minor fit perfectly with the scale and C minor is the 4th chord from the G minor scale. You are allowed to do that and it sound pretty good; it is also pretty common. Here is an example where Elvis uses it: ...


4

If I understand correctly, you find it easy to remember individual melodic lines (monophony), but have trouble remembering chord progressions (polyphony). I'm going to guess that this problem is related to ear training. You can mentally "hear" a monophonic line, and even mentally "sing" it, which allows you to remember intuitively how it goes. You can then ...


3

I see a problem right away in the way you are looking at the analysis. When you analyze something and notate either a chord or a Roman numeral the chord is meant to analyze all notes and pitches up to the next chord/Roman numeral change with the exception of a few non-harmonic tones that are typically notated. Also note you are in the key of C# minor so the ...


3

Far more often than not, the first full bar of a song contains the key chord. This 'sets the scene' for the listener. and establishes 'home'. In this case, it COULD be in C minor, which then brings the Am into question. This is explained away with the idea of 'parallel key', which gives another set of harmonies to use. As in not only the Cm set - Cm, Fm, ...


3

This is described somewhat in the answers here: Scale degree naming Basically, scale degrees are typically numbered according to the (parallel) major key, even if you're actually playing in a minor key, or some other mode. Thus in your case, A major would have a G# and an F#, so the bVII and bVI tells us that they have to be lowered (the sharps removed). ...


2

On an electric or cutaway-acoustic this can actually be done in the obvious way. Without a cutaway, there's two things you can do, if you actually want to preserve that specific chord's sound, rather than just its harmonic function as the other answers instruct: Omit some notes. Crucial is to know which ones are really needed urgently. In your case: The ...


2

Most songs are built within a key, however it is not uncommon to have chords outside the key in a song. There are several ways to incorporate chords outside the key including: secondary dominants Substitutions Borrowing Chromatic With all the above examples you are still in the key you started in, just the harmony is temporarily not reflecting the key. ...


2

Caleb Hines' answer is very spot on. It all comes down to ear training. You're also gonna have to identify chords by ear i.e., know when a chord is a minor, a major, and any other voicings. I say this because it's going to be useful in identifying whether a specific chord is a 'I' or a 'II' etc in relation to the song. Interestingly, in my experience I ...


1

I've been playing guitar for about 7 years now and I also had difficulties with memorizing chord patterns in the beginning. What I discovered after a while is, that every song has his own movement. When playing a chord, you have to imagine your hand as a single "position" on the guitar neck. I will use the famous chord progression of "Wonderwall" by Oasis: ...


1

Something which may help is training the process of memorising the chord progressions, for instance you play along with the sheet music or chord chart a few times for just the verse and then look away from the chords and play from memory. Repeat this with each part of the song (verse, chorus bridge etc) Wait a few minutes and then try again. By repeating ...


1

Write the song with the melody BEFORE you worry about what key it's in. I think you'll only limit yourself (box yourself in) if you try to choose a key first (since it sounds like you've mostly learned by ear up to this point, anyways.) Make the song/tune/piece sound good to you first and then you can figure out what key it's in. I've played with some ...


1

Honestly, it could fit in several different keys, including C major, C minor, G major. There's not enough data here to tell for sure. At least one of the chords must be borrowed, though, since there is no single key that contains the E natural (in Am and C) and the E flat (in Cm). In order to define a key, you really need a cadence: a dominant-tonic ...


1

If your guitar has a fat/wide neck, you can try to position your thumb parallel to where your index finger is when barring. Make sure it's flat against the neck, with mostly the force on the joint of your thumb. You can also try changing to lighter string gauges and making sure your guitar has proper setup and action.


1

There's nothing wrong with barring all the strings on an A shape chord. In fact, there's nothing wrong with playing all six strings. It just gives the 2nd inversion of the chord, which can sound just as good in some songs. You could consider playing strings 2,3 and 4 in different ways. The most common is with 3 fingers, obviously middle, ring and pinky. ...


1

E7 is the Dominant of A minor. E major is almost correct but, you are missing the minor 7. The major third and the minor 7 of every dominant chord make the interval of a tritone.


1

The notes of the dominant chord of a minor is E/G#/B. E - G# is a Major third while E - B is a perfect fifth. This makes the chord Major. I think you are getting confused by what it means for a scale to minor / Major and what it means for a chord to minor / Major. A Major Chord is one with a Major third and a perfect fifth. This can happen in both minor ...


1

It's probably more often the V because it has that G#. That comes from both the harmonic and the melodic minors. Sometimes Eminor is the V and it is used in lots of songs.Yes, it originates from the natural minor (or in some cases the melodic). It isn't so decisive, but still pushes towards I, which is the job of any V chord.


1

Don't bother playing this chord because John Frusciante doesn't play it either. In this part he sometimes plays x 9 9 9 7 x and other times he plays x 9 9 9 11 x


1

It depends entirely on the genre, and that is actually one of the defining characteristics of genre. most pop: probably, and mostly. Sometimes augmented by the occasional secondary dominant. Part of why they are so "easy to hear". But if it's torch-songy pop, probably not because they borrow a lot from the style of standards musical theatre or standards or ...


1

In addition to jadarnel27's excellent answer, I think it's worth discussing diatonic intervals. A diatonic internal is one that is composed entirely of notes in a scale. For example, in the key of C, a C major chord is made of the notes C E G. The interval between C and E is a major this. A d minor chord is spelled D F A and has a minor third between the D ...



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