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16

The triangle symbol Δ originally meant "triad" (meaning major triad) [1]. However, nowadays it is - at least to my knowledge - exclusively used to denote a major seventh chord, even though it is a bit sloppy. I recommend you use Δ7 for denoting a major seventh chord. This will avoid any possible confusion, and it is also the symbol I come across most often. ...


14

It's known as a tritone substitution. In jazz you can substitute any dominant-seventh chord with the one a tritone (b5 or #4) away. This works because of the major-third and minor-seventh which are in every dominant-seventh chord. These make the interval of a tritone, which is exactly half an octave, and so gives exactly the same notes when transposed by a ...


12

In general, smaller intervals do not sound as pleasing in a bass register as they do in a treble register. This is a general effect that occurs regardless of whether you play a consonance or a dissonance, although it is more noticeable with dissonances. What happens is that the overtones of the bass notes end up having more noticeable clashes between them, ...


9

The D7 chord is D (root), F♯ (major 3rd), A (perfect 5th), C (minor 7th). Any voicing that includes all four of those is correct. For example, the barre fingering is A–D–F♯–C, which is correct. Furthermore, the chord is in root position on a soprano or concert ukulele – meaning that the root is the lowest-pitched note – which is ideal for playing ...


8

A D7 chord consists of: D - the root note - if you leave it out the chord is ambiguous, but you might fix that by having another instrument, your voice, or the listener's imagination, fill it in. When you're the only accompaniment, however, you typically want the tonic as one of the lowest notes in your chord, as an anchor (this is why bass guitars often ...


8

Use flats. In fact, write the bass of the 3rd chord as D♭. You're not only running parallel second inversion diminished chords downwards, you're doing so in a key that already uses flats in the key signature. I'd even be tempted to write the soprano and bass of the second chord as C♭ and E♭♭ respectively, but leaving them be might be a little easier to read. ...


8

Actually, a major chord is formed by using a root, a major third and a perfect fifth. Doesn't necessarily have to be the 1,3 and 5 of the scale. Let's take the C major scale and see for which root notes we have the major third and the perfect fifth: C; the third is E (major third), the fifth is G (perfect) -> Major Chord (I) D; the third is F (minor) E; ...


6

Not everybody can do this but the trick is your finger forms a 2nd, partial barre at the 3rd fret, but bends so it raises above the highest string. Some people play A like this as standard however I believe it partly comes down to luck how long your fingers are, how practical this technique will be. Check out this awful drawing:


6

I use this kind of "A-shape" barre chord all the time, although I must admit I rarely teach it to students. I actually find it easier than using fingers 2, 3 and 4 to play the three fret 3 notes. All you have to do is bend your third L.H. finger backwards, so that the joint nearest the knuckle moves forwards and away from string 1. Here's a picture of me ...


5

I'm not sure if you're interested in classical examples, but this kind of thing happens all the time in Baroque music, almost to the point of being ubiquitous. One quick example that pops to mind is this section from Brandenburg Concerto #2. Start the passage right at (or slightly before) 2:00 (apparently SE doesn't honor t=### tags in youtube links). This ...


4

It depends how you want to look at. Practically if you told someone to play a Cadd#9, they would understand to play the notes C, D#, E, and G. However from a theoretical standpoint, most likely the name would not properly show function as technically there are two thirds in the chord (D# is an enharmonic equivalent to Eb). I have seen this chord come up ...


4

First of all, I do not think that there are keys that "do not work well together". There are just better or worse ways to make a transition from one key to another. Obviously, there are keys that are very remote from each other, but nevertheless, a good composer will be able to make a convincing transition. Of course, certain key changes occur much more ...


4

In isolation, FAC doesn't belong to any key. It's just an F major . When it's put into a piece it goes into context. Usually, a piece IN F will end ON F, and feel that it has ended, without the need for any more to follow. Often, that piece will start ON an F (usually in the first full bar if there's an anacrucis) as well. The feeling of 'home'. At various ...


4

The chords available to you in a given key are the same no matter what mode you choose. This is because you're still constructing the chords from the same set of 7 notes. For example, in C major, you have CDEFGAB, and no sharps or flats. That means that (ignoring "fancier" chords"), the chord on C is CEG = C major, the chord on D is DFA = D minor, and so ...


4

You can try to use chords that are common to both keys, and re-interpret their function. For your example (A minor and B minor), the common triads are D, Em, E, and G (note that in minor both the 6th and the 7th scale degree can be either minor or major). Also note that a ii-V progression always leads nicely to the I chord. Examples: || Am | Dm | Em ...


4

0The 'o' bit designates dim, or diminished. Slightly different from the ø which is half-diminished. Wish my keyboard could print it properly - it probably can, but I'm not clever enough to make it work! Half-dim., incidentally is aka m7b5.


3

The reasoning behind the chord voicing you found in the book is that it is a pure four-part voicing of a dominant seventh-chord, without repetition of notes. So you don't need any other strings to play that chord. Of course, the chord shape you suggest is well known and it sound good in most contexts, but it is redundant in the sense that it doubles the ...


3

The different modes derived from any particular scale will contain the same notes. This means that while staying in the key, you will have the same chords available to you. The main difference between being in one mode vs. another is what we treat as tonic, or home base as I like to refer to it for those that don't know the term tonic. This means that the ...


3

There are two common ukulele chords called D7. The traditional D7 chord is the barre chord: This chord has all four of the D7 notes: D, F♯, A, C The other D7 chord is a common alternative on the ukulele: This form of the D7 chord is often called the Hawaiian D7, perhaps because it is popular in Hawaii. As others have noted, it is missing the D note. ...


3

Are you talking about the piano here? Because on the piano, even single notes are more dissonant in the bass clef than in the treble clef (look up "disharmonicity") because of the thickness of strings. Also for low frequency you can hear more overtones, and consequently their possible clashes. And also for lower frequencies more beatings are in the ...


3

the third (A) and seventh (Eb) of F7 also correspond to the third (Eb) and seventh (A) of B7, so you are basically substituting B7 for F7 (with some of the tension notes altered on the B7: #4 and b9 which are typical modifications on a dominant 7th).


3

A good way to a modulation is via a diminished chord. Thus Am - Ao - F#7 - Bm. As the dim contains A and F# (Gb for purists, maybe?), it bridges nicely. Or going bluntly, Am - Bbm - Bm. Or a staccato stop on Am, Then a rest, then straight into Bm. It shouldn't be difficult to re-pitch if that bit's sung.


3

Both answers are great, but do you know there are other ways to play this chord here. The index barre can be over all 6 strings, which can all be strummed. It just gives an inversion of Bb. 3 fingers can be used, on 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Otherwise, two fingers can be used, with two strings held down by one finger, and the other with another finger. As ...


2

C G B F (C-M9sus4? C-M11?) C Maj7 add 4, or C Maj11 Ab C E B - Ab aug add #9 Ab C E Bb - Ab aug add 2 G B D# A# - G aug add #9 B Eb Gb Bb - Ebmin add #5 (first inversion) C Gb Bb D - C9 add b5 F C Eb Bb - F7 add 4 (could be major or minor) B E Gb Bb - 057e (12-tone) Bb F C E (Bb-M11? Bb-Aug11?) - Bb add #4 add 2 (could also be major or minor) C# G B ...


2

You can easily check what 4 notes are played in each chord if you know your musical alphabet. If you have the same notes in both, but in different orders, they are just different voicings of the same chord and it comes down really to choice or how they sound in each song you use them in. Assuming your uke is tuned A-E-C-G then your first version has notes ...


2

1+2+3+5. If I get what you mean, some keys do not work well with each other, so make sure that you find out if the two keys sounds nice together before you make the change (plan). Use a circle of fifths! If the two keys you want are far from each other, they don't sound good as a transition! To change midway, you need to "prime" the audience - make them know ...


2

Yeah, most of the basic chords will be the same, but how you use them will differ. Most of the minor-like modes will need some help with leading tones, that is, melodic semitones into the final (the tonic note of the mode), which will add altered chords. Also, you will probably tend to avoid certain progressions so as to keep the tonic from being ...


2

To add to Patrx2's answer, you will call the note Ab (for the key Bb). The reason why is because you're referring to the seventh scale degree when you label the pitch "ta" (we called it "te" but that's not the subject of the question :) ). Ti, Te, or Ta all refer to a pitch of the seventh scale degree. And so it must be a note that starts with the letter ...


2

Oddly enough, I actually ran into this very scenario yesterday as I was giving a guitar lesson. I initially had the student play the G in the way you describe, with pinkie on the high "e" (I always play this way as it is much easier for many other chord shapes). After seeing the student struggle quite a bit, we switched to the other fingering indicated in ...


2

It's something , as a teacher, that I've never addressed. Whichever is the easier option is the one taken. It's after all, within the first half a dozen chords a beginner will learn. Fingers will be weak, but one way or other will suit most.At some point, they need strengthening, so why not start immediately? Occasionally, pupils will also use the 3rd fret ...



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