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12

You can build chords on any scale. You would build chords the same way you build them in the typical major and minor scales. You would take a root note of any scale degree and add the 3rd above the root and the 5th above the root and you get your chord. I'll use the example you've given that is based on the different minors. In A natural minor you have ...


11

It sounds like she may have been talking about the Tristan Chord, a famous chord from the opening of Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde. While it can be enharmonically written as a half-diminished 7th chord (F-A♭-C♭-E♭), it does not resolve in the way a half-diminished 7th chord would, nor is it written as a half-diminished 7th chord. For this ...


8

You can't tell for certain either which key this is in, or which chords would appear above these bass notes, but for different reasons... This short excerpt of music has only four pitches: E, D, F# and G - these notes are found in the scales of several keys: G Major and its relative minor E Minor (natural minor) have these notes: E, F#, G, A, B, C, D D ...


6

At one point in time (mainly the Baroque period,) a common way to notate a keyboard part was to simply write the bass part and then notate with numbers what intervals above the bass note were needed to complete the chord. This is called figured bass. So, for instance, if you wanted to indicated a root position 7th chord, you would write 3,5,7 below the ...


5

The given chord will be the underlying harmony. That does not mean that the notes at that point of time played by the piano will feature every note in A minor, nor does it mean that nothing but notes fitting an A minor chord will be present. It just means that if another accompanying instrument were to play an A minor chord, this would fit with the music. ...


5

Having been a professional music educator, copyist and performer for over 40 years, I see some issues that are based on the habit of mixing "pop lead sheet" theory and knowing the actual spellings of chords. Too many times, writers try to dumb-down chord spellings to make them easy for novices to understand. Not meant as condescending statement, but there ...


4

I see a problem right away in the way you are looking at the analysis. When you analyze something and notate either a chord or a Roman numeral the chord is meant to analyze all notes and pitches up to the next chord/Roman numeral change with the exception of a few non-harmonic tones that are typically notated. Also note you are in the key of C# minor so the ...


4

It's figured bass. The numbers correspond to the interval between the bass note and the notes above the bass. In root position you have the intervals 3, 5, and 7 above the bass. 5 and 3 are just standard triad intervals so the it is simplified to V7 In first inversion you have the intervals 3, 5, and 6 above the bass. We have just a 6 to denote a triad in ...


3

If the notes are A-E-A, the chord is indeed ambiguous. It could be an A or Am chord. However, the context can often tell you what the chord is supposed to be, even if the third (C# in case of A chord, C in case of Am chord) is missing. For instance, this chord will most likely be an Am chord if it appears in a C or Am key. If the sheet music describes ...


2

If it's on sheet music, it probably won't be describing the chord shown. More likely it will be telling you what chord can be played along with that bar/part bar of the music. There may be another part, for example, with just a G note for the bar, and the chord shown may be C. There will generally be chords shown, often for a chordal instrument like guitar ...


2

Using Roman numeral analysis you can look at it as a I - viio/ii - ii7 in the key of F, but I would look at it slightly differently see below. Roman numeral analysis doesn't work in all cases and in fact I wouldn't give this chord a roman numeral since it is a chromatic passing chord between two chords in the key. Think of it this way you are going ...


2

Personally, I find augmented chords (like c e g#) much worse to resolve than diminished chords: diminished chords reduce to a seventh chord by lowering any chord note by a semitone and resolve obviously from there. One can often actually use them functionally instead of a seventh chord in the first place. Augmented chords don't work in that manner. If you ...


1

They may have said the Tristan Chord, but I would argue it is resolvable, and in fact not mysterious... as others have pointed out, the analysis works well if you see the G# as a non-harmonic tone, a lower neighbor (in A minor) to the A at the end of the measure. Then we have the following notes, spelling them out in thirds: (B D# F A). We have F in the ...


1

I'm not sure I could call any chord "unresolvable", though I'd have to know the context of the conversation. However, augmented chords (e.g. C-E-G♯), as well as diminished 7th chords (e.g. C-E♭-G♭-B♭♭) -- both of which have been mentioned in other answers -- share a common trait: they are, in some sense, symmetric. Augmented chords ...


1

While Dom talks about the V chords which in themselves sound unfinished, they are resolvable. I think it may be diminished chords that you have in mind.They use notes which are usually not within the key in question, thus sound a little strange, and can, by their make-up, go to several different places. The V chord, 9 times out of 10, will find resolution in ...


1

It could be written as vo or iiio as both of those notes feature in the diminished chord. Could even be bviio as an Eb may also be played. However, as the lowest note is apparently an F#, it could also be written #Io,(#io) although I've never seen that written. The lower case seems to be used to indicate a 'minor' chord, as a diminished has a minor ...



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