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47

There are a ton of easy and great-sounding substitutions, and you can use them in the turnaround or anywhere else you want. Here are a few of the most common: ii-V sub: Substitute ii for IV, so that you have a ii-V turnaround. For example, if you're playing in the key of C, the V chord is G7 and the ii chord is Dm7. So instead of C-F-G7, play C-Dm7-G7. ...


29

To understand the answer to this question you need and understanding of these concepts: Key center Tonality Chord progressions in functional harmony Cadence A song is regarded as being in the key of C major if the pitch C is its key center, if the notes in the song chiefly fall in the C-major scale (as opposed to the C-minor scale, or one of the other ...


28

I was struggling with my barre chords, but then my teacher showed me two great exercises. I've been doing them for a week or two and--it's a miracle--barre chords started sounding good! 1. Pure barre practicing Just hold all the strings on fret 7 with your first finger and nothing else and check if all the strings sound clear. You can help with your second ...


28

A guitarist has exactly the same problem as you do. If you just strum the chord on the downbeat, or on every beat, it sounds boring. You have to play more interesting patterns. The guitarist does have a couple of advantages over a pianist in this respect. Early on, a guitarist learns to get more rhythmic interest out of a basic chord, by varying the rhythm ...


24

The basic chords that todd suggested are very good as a basic for barre chord: Example E major - note that the B chord is basically A using barre at 2nd fret. E A B Note: If you have problems with barre, you can often cheat with the B and use B7 instead without sounding too wrong (see below in the septim section) Another set of chords that is easy ...


23

I think the only answer to this one is...keep doing it. The reason you're struggling is because your hand and fingers aren't strong enough yet to do it easily. It's like weight lifting, the more you do it, the stronger you'll get. Try playing barre chords further up the neck, around the 5th fret. You might find it a little easier than F on the 1st, then ...


20

One of the best ways is to play scales using chords. Set up a metronome, and change a chord on every forth beat. Choose a slower tempo if you can't do it on time. When you get comfortable, try more complex rhythm or a finger picking pattern. Here is an example of the F scale with jazz chords: Fmaj7 Gm7 Am7 Bbmaj7 C7 Dm7 Ehalfdim Fmaj7 Here are the ...


20

It all depends on which chord you want it to be. With GBD, you have a strong G tendency, and with the Es, that leans E minor. With the A, That's an added 4. So EminAdd4 (not suspended, because you still have the G). But if you want to think of it as an A, With the A and E, you have the root and the fifth. The G is a dominant 7. The B is a 9th away from that ...


20

The root note is always the note that is the basis for the chord, regardless of its inversion. In root position the lowest note is the root (hence the name), but other notes are the lowest in other inversions of the chord. For example, take a C Major chord. In every position, the root note is C. Whether it is voiced as C-E-G (root position), E-G-C (first ...


19

In classical theory, the necessity or lack thereof of a particular chord member is generally determined by the note's tendency to lead to another note. That tendency comes most often from the interval of an augmented fourth or diminished fifth. Enharmonically, those intervals are the same, but in context, they are not, and they resolve differently. In a ...


18

There are, of course, an enormous variety of chord progressions used in jazz. That said, here are three you should know: 12-bar Blues The basic 12-bar blues as played in jazz (not as played in blues) usually goes something like: I-IV-I-I-IV-IV-I-vi-ii-V-I-turnaround In blues, all these chords would be dominant sevenths. Jazz players, however, ...


18

Yes. It has to do with the ratio of their frequencies. Essentially, the smaller the numbers involved the better. The perfect unison, with a 1:1 ratio (e.g., C played with the same C), has perfect consonance. C to the next G has a 2:3 ratio; the perfect fifth is the next most consonant. The minor second (e.g., C to C#) is the most dissonant in Western ...


18

Context is important -- what else happens around the chord. Let's just take the C major chord for starters. Listen to these examples: The first two measures of Mozart's sonata "for beginners" in C major. A nice, pleasant chord. Happy music. The opening of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony. This has a much more energetic and heroic sound. The opening of the ...


18

Pursuant to Mark Lutton's excellent answer, I'd like to make the point that Chords don't give us feelings, we give chords feelings. The feeling you get after hearing a chord is not inherent in that chord--the only thing inherent in any chord is the physics of the harmonic series. (There is something to be said for consonance vs. dissonance within the ...


17

The 'sus' is short for 'suspended'. The term comes from traditional music theory, and it refers to that the chord has a note that was suspended, or 'delayed', or 'carried over', from the previous chord. Traditionally the suspended fourth note in the sus4-chord should also be resolved to the third before any further chord action. Here is an example chord ...


16

It really depends on context. It could be an Am6, but this is an unlikely inversion, so probably not. It could be an F#m7b5, especially if followed by some form of B7, where it would serve as a II in E, probably E minor. For other functions of half-diminished chords, see Wikipedia: Half-diminished Seventh Chord. It could also be a rootless D9 voicing with ...


16

Basically, neither fingers nor your wrist should hurt. Tension is your enemy, you have to become aware of tension before it becomes pain. In the words of Joe Satriani : No pain, no pain. If it's the thumb, chances are you're grabbing the neck as if you were falling and needed to hold onto it, that's not the way it should be : the thumb is an anchor for the ...


16

Could it be Power Chords you're after? If you add just a fifth and an octave, it gives you a beefier incarnation of the root note. e ---------------------------- B ---------------------------- G --------2-----------3---2--- D 2---5---2---2---5---3---2--- A 2---5---0---2---5---1---0--- E 0---3-------0---3----------- The third (missing here) is called the ...


15

Interesting question, although my answer might be more historical than you'd like ;-) One answer is that it gives you all the notes of the diatonic scale on the white keys, so by transposing to C major you can play any major-key melody that doesn't modulate using only the white keys. Another way of saying this: assume that you are working in our musical ...


15

You're right that the same melody can be played over a variety of different chord sequences, and that the choice of chords will have a marked effect on how the piece sounds. One of the modern jazz performers' favourite tricks is to take a well known melody and accompany it with unexpected (yet still musically pleasing) chords. Note that the key signature ...


15

There does exist what we call "rootless" voicings in harmony. These are chords in which the root is implied by the upper harmonies. Typically, the 3rd and the 7th are the primary indicators of chord quality, and the 5th is secondary. Rootless voicings are most commonly used in settings where an instrument such as piano or guitar is providing harmonic support ...


14

Learn to recognize intervals between notes quickly. For example, notes that skip a line or space are a third apart. Notes that skip seven are an octave apart. When reading a chord quickly, read the root/lowest note and then the intervals above it and place them in the key. With experience you will be able to recognize common voicings by shape alone.


14

It's a mantra of mine that a given chord (or chord name) only properly exists in the context of a specific chord progression. Thus, the name you give to the chord formed by the 6 open strings of the guitar depends on what key and mode you use this chord in. It might have one name if used in the key of A major, another name if used in the key of E minor, and ...


14

Yes, there are ways to measure it, though there are many different algorithms claiming to be more accurate than the others. This formula by Vassilakis is recent (2007). These measure "roughness", which is similar to dissonance. (Dissonance is basically roughness, but weighted towards certain intervals due to cultural conditioning, which is obviously hard ...


14

Use the diatonic harmony trick of stacking notes and see what you come up with. For instance, in G, the notes of the major scale are G A B C D E F# If we stack every other note in that list (wrap to the beginning when necessary) 3 times we get a simple minor or major chord/triad: G,B,D - G Major A,C,E - A Minor B,D,F# - B Minor ...


14

When you play in D minor, the scale -- that is your "palette" of notes -- is: D, E, F, G, A, B♭, and C You'll find it's not possible to play a D major chord using those notes. D major contains an F♯. The simplest way to find the chord you want is to identify its root note, then play a triad starting on that note, using only the notes in the scale. So ...


14

Yes they exist. I don't know all of them of the top of my head, but I'll give you the three that come to mind easily. The first is a fully diminished chord. Because there are only 12 named notes and a fully diminished chord is made of 4 notes that are a minor 3rd apart from each other (3 semitones) there are only 3 different chords but each can be named 4 ...


14

When a 13th is written in a chord name, this always refers to the major 13th, which is the same as a major 6th - in this case an A natural. This is one of the conventions of how chords symbols are written. It may seem a little odd that the 6th or 13th of a minor chord is major, but there are a number of situations like this. For instance, 7ths are always ...


13

Some of the most popular chords in funk include E9, E7, and E7+9 (also widely known as the so-called "Hendrix Chord", since Jimi used it in "Purple Haze" and other songs), transposed as necessary. Here are their canonical voicings: E9 and E13 (Often, players will play these without the bass note): $A.7.$D.6.$G.7.$B.7.$e.7 | $A.7.$D.6.$G.7.$B.7.$e.9 ...


13

Here are some classic combinations for you to play around with. I've supplied each progression with an example of chords in one key and an explanation of the positional formulas that will allow it to be transposed to all other keys - simply choose a position for the first chord and follow the instructions. I've also added some brief comments about the theory ...



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