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5

You should name it Eb maj7 because that's what it actually is. If the lowest note is G, then it is just the first inversion of Eb maj7.


4

You have to remember the full chord is an E7#9 meaning that the chord is a E7 with an added #9. The notes of the E7 are standard unless otherwise stated. It is an altered chord because we're adding a #9 which is considered altered tone because we are taking the natural 9 and raising it or altering it to get the sound we want. However just because the 9th is ...


4

Even if the b2 interval mentioned in Dan Davis's answer is avoided by using a different voicing, the problem that is usually meant in this context is the b9 interval between the major 7th and the (higher) root note. The b9 interval is considered a very dissonant interval which in traditional jazz harmony is only "allowed" on a dominant seventh chord ...


3

First of all I want to say congratulations on your decision to learn guitar. As you have already discovered, it is not an easy instrument to master - but once things begin to come together and you start learning to change from chord to chord and play songs, it is very rewarding. And since there is always room for improvement no matter how good you become, ...


3

There are a number of ways to play a G chord in what I call first position (using some open strings). The easiest possible way to play it is to fret the high e (first) string on the third fret with a finger of your choice and play the four strings closest to the floor (the four skinniest strings 1-4). Here are the charts for 5 ways to play a G chord in ...


3

It looks like that bit of information has been in the article since it was written. From the original 2005 article: Often the melody note or other pitched phenomena influences which of the above chord types a performer selects. For example, if the melody note is the root of the chord, including a major seventh can frequently cause a harsh dissonance. I ...


3

When playing in a key, not every single note/chord played needs to be in a key. The analysis you link is as follows: Bb: |B Bb A Bb|B Bb A Bb| | I - | - - | What it mean though is simple. In this section we're perceiving the Bb chord as "tonic"and the B and A chords really don't function in a traditional sense and are more for ornamentation. ...


2

Ah, yes! This tip from Joe is one of my all time favorite things to meditate on. I especially like to pick voicings from the Joe Pass chord book, and apply this concept to them. I think that the main idea here is associating different sounds with chord voicings, and developing your ear to hear different harmonic possibilities over chords. Also, developing ...


2

A good example is used by Bill Evans on So What: Bill used the kind of chords you mentioned, while adding a third at the end. The theorists have categorized these kind of chords as ...


2

This is the 'easy come, easy go' part, right? Firstly, in a rock and pop music in general, taking the same chord shape and moving it around is a common device. Think of the F-C-G-D-A (all major) flourish at the end of the Time Warp chorus, or the all minor chord progression Bm-F#m-Am-Em in Inner City's Goodlife. Obviously doing this often takes you outside ...


2

while triad-based chords imply specific harmonies, quartal chords are more generic and basically don't imply specific harmony in the key you're in, which means you can use them pretty much anyplace and in lieu of regular chord progressions. Quartals are more vague so they fit in a wide variety of situations. Quartals can also be thought of as voicings for ...


2

It's important to realize that there are two basic flavors of that chord: the first being the "Hendrix chord", which acts as a I chord, i.e. you use an E7/#9 in a song that is in E (like Purple Haze). Here, you can't use an altered 5th, because this would take away the stability necessary for the I chord. You could use a perfect fifth though (but I've never ...


2

I once heard from a pianist that the chord you know is what you will hear in a song. This means that if you hear a song and hear a Dominant #5b9 and you were very familiar with dimished chords you will first interpret the chord you heard as a diminshed chord my advise is to learn the different chords. Go to apassion4jazz.net (something like that). You will ...


2

From my experience as a guitar teacher there are some people who (with some practice) are able to play that chord, and some simply aren't. You're dependent on the size of your hand and especially of the flexibility of your third finger. People who can flex their third finger in the "wrong" direction will find it easier to play that chord. Also your pinky ...


2

Spacing ("voicing") a chord like that makes the interval between the topmost "seventh" and the melody note a semitone, also called a minor second. A different spacing would change that to a major seventh. Minor seconds sound harsher than major sevenths, because the notes of a minor second usually occupy the same psychoacoustic critical band. That's why, ...


1

I want set your vocabulary straight before answering your question. An inversion is a very specific idea in music where the lowest note of a chord (the bass note) affects the function of the chord. A voicing is a specific ordering of notes. These ideas are grouped together a lot and sometimes are interchangeable, but this distinction will be important to my ...


1

Practice, practice, practice. What you are experiencing is 100% natural. Every guitarist out there had this problem at first. It's very common for guitar methods to give you the C chord as your first one. This chord is very hard for beginners. Keep practicing, and play chords that you find are easier (like D, E, and Am). You'll get it, just be ...


1

If you are really struggling, make your first 3 chords E A and B7. They all work together, and with them, you will be able to accompany literally hundreds of songs. E and A are quite easy to play separately, and the change from one to the other is simple. If you leave your index finger on 3rd string 1st fret, it can stay there for both chords. It acts as an ...


1

Jazz people call it sideslipping and it's a way of reinforcing your primary chord. Your primary chord is Bb, so if you temporary move up (or down) a half-step and back, it tends to reinforce the sound of Bb as "home base".


1

You can either use them as "sounds" in a more impressionistic way if you play a modal piece (just like on the whole "Kind of Blue" album mentioned in Shevliaskovic's answer). But if you want to play them in "the context of an existing harmony", assuming you mean standard harmony based on thirds, then you can try to figure out how those quartal chords are ...


1

A 20 year old hardware Midi expander/arranger (Ketron MS40 is what I use, but there is a lot of different ones around) will be so much less painful than what you can make Linux software do that it isn't funny. Hydrogen is a reasonably workable drum arranger/sequencer readily available on Linux. It works directly via PCM so you avoid the lousy sample ...


1

First off, two links. One person's transcription of the chords for "Crush": http://www.azchords.com/d/davematthewsband-tabs-1009/crush-tabs-104305.html And another person's "accurate Dave Matthews Band tablature": http://www.dmbtabs.com/song.php?sid=41 Those two seem to match pretty well and seem good to me compared to a live performance with just Dave and ...


1

Here is a link to Jamey Aebersold Jazz http://www.jazzbooks.com/ There is a great pdf that has a book relating to what you may need. http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


1

Good answers here. These are my two cents: Know who your favorite producers are. Have a good sense for what you love and what you don't. Sometimes knowing what you don't want is more important than knowing what you do want. Do your homework - read everything you can about your favorite producers. Through interviews, you will gain insight into their ...



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