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17

I'd call it a Cadd#9 and there's a few reasons why. First of all if you think about the chord in terms of extensions a #9 is rather common and if you added a Bb to the chord you described people would hands down call that a C7#9 which is a common altered dominant chord. Second in general when naming chords we typically like to compare the notes to the ...


15

I would argue that your premise that the chords used in a song should be comprised of notes that occur in the scale of the tonic key doesn't really hold. Yes, the majority of songs tend to use almost exclusively diatonic triads, however, there are many example of non-diatonic chords, for instance, borrowed chords and secondary dominants. In traditional ...


12

First let's not look at it as a #V chord, but a bVI chord. This chord naturally occurs in the parallel minor and can easily be borrowed. Let's look at how the notes move with a sample progression in the key of C: IV F - A - C bVI(7) Ab - C - Eb - (G) I C - E - G If you look at this progression without the 7th, you'll notice a few ...


11

On a basic level, this is just a modal chord progression using the Mixolydian mode, which contains a b7 scale degree. That makes the notes you're using G A B C D E F G. The G major triad (G B D) and the F major triad (F A C) are both right in there. But doesn't necessarily reconcile other chords aside from those two (assuming not all the songs you're talking ...


7

No, the 7th and 9th are not vital to a sus4 chord. A "regular" sus4 would just have root, fourth, and fifth (so C, F, G, in this case). That said, jazz seems to never play simple "regular" chords without adding at least a 7th. But the chord you have listed could probably be more accurately described as a C9sus4 (without the 5th, if you want to get really ...


7

While most pop and jazz musicians would call this chord a ♯9 chord of some sort, classical people may say that the chord has split thirds, and a theory professor would say that the chord is the pitch class set [0,3,4,7]. There are a lot of ways to rationalize this chord, and any of these would be acceptable depending on who you speak to. If you're just ...


7

Knowing what modes/scales to use over a chord can be approached a number of ways. Here's an over simplified way to know what scale you can use over a certain chord (DISCLAIMER: THIS IS OVERSIMPLIFIED): Is it Major? (R 3 5 7) Is the fourth sharped? (Yes - you might try Lydian) Otherwise, use Ionian or all of the above Is it Minor? (R b3 5 b7) Is the ...


6

Casey's answer is fundamental and should be thoroughly understood. When you're ready to go farther afield, you can use other closely-related minor 7th chords. Consider this chord progression: I-I7-IV-V7-I. The I7 is a "secondary dominant", the "V7 of the IV" chord. It gives a stronger feeling of "fourness" to the IV chord. Now, if you wanted to more ...


6

You can use V-I, although you need to prep it well. A not-unusual formula is to end with a standard Phrygian cadence (♭vii6-I), and then close it off with V-I or viiᵒ-I (often over over a tonic pedal). Also, less conventional, but using a formula that actually arose from the Phrygian cadence, is to use an augmented sixth as your dominant. (I've closed off a ...


6

It's because how we build chords. The most typical way to build chords is in thirds thus when we name intervals with respect to a chord we use odd intervals to represent them. Also note a 10th reduces to a 3rd which is one of the basic building blocks of chords. It doesn't make sense espically from a functional standpoint to have two thirds in a chord.


5

First, it is indeed a diminished triad. For triads, there is no such thing as a fully or half-diminished chord. The latter two chords are seventh chords. A fully diminished seventh chord has a diminished seventh (i.e. for Bdim7 that's an A flat: Ab), and a half-diminished seventh chord has a minor seventh, i.e. a Bm7(b5) has an A. Both seventh chords add the ...


5

There are already some good answers, but I'd like to add an important term for a concept which is able to explain really a lot of occurrences of non-diatonic chords in popular music (and not only there). The concept is called modal interchange [1], which is the borrowing of chords from parallel tonalities. The borrowing of chords from the parallel minor key ...


5

I usually use this chord as an upper structure of a D13(b9) chord: (D) C Eb F# B Used in that way, it is an altered dominant chord. It could also be the upper structure of an Ab7(#9) chord: (Ab) C Eb Gb B Of course, this is also an altered dominant chord. But it can also function as a chord in its own right, i.e. not only as an upper structure. In that ...


4

I would say it depends much more on the progression then the actual function of each chord. For example, vi to V in isolation would sound nearly identical to ii to I as the same type of movement is used in the chords and in fact in different keys they may be the same chords. However in a I-ii-V or a I-vi-V progression the function in the key is ...


4

Each mode has it's own unique harmony associated with it and Phrygian is no different. The most notable thing about Phrygian harmony is the II chord which in E Phrygian is F. It's really strong and it is very commonly borrowed and used as what is known as a Neapolitan chord. You would want your chord progression to utilize the II chord like a dominant since ...


4

There are no chords called C1, C2, C3, or C4. In the tab the author just means different versions (voicings) of a C chord; he could as well have called them C_A, C_B, etc. One of those voicings is actually a Cadd9 chord (from low to high): x 3 2 0 3 3 (the note on the third fret of the b string is a D, i.e. the 9th of C). Note that this chord is different ...


4

Minor seventh chords can typically be substituted whenever adding a diatonic 7th (the 7th that is within the current key) to a minor triad leads to a minor seventh. In a major key, this occurs for ii7, iii7 and vi7. In a minor key, this occurs for i7, vi7 and v7. So for instance, if you have a chord progression, like I-iii-vi-ii-V, you could add 7th to ...


4

The best way is for you to practice a bunch of simple songs - folk tunes, Christmas carols, children's music - learning the chords to these songs. This will train your ear as to the appropriate ways of using chords. There is no software which will add chords to a tune because for any particular melody different chord progressions can be used, it's partly ...


4

This is a good example of a non-dominant diminished chord with a diatonic function (i.e. resolving to a diatonic chord). Note that often diminished chords function as dominants. This is the case when the root of the diminished chord is the leading tone to the root of the diatonic resolution chord. However, in your example this is not the case because then ...


4

Putting in the b7 as well makes it what is affectionately known as the Hendrix chord - 7#9. He didn't invent it - just loved using it. It sounds like the major and minor third are played within the same chord, but technically it's written as a #9. Usually 9ths will incorporate a 7th as well.In this case, a flat 7th. Without the 7th, it'll be, as already ...


3

The others are spot on in saying that learning some music theory is the best way to be good at this, but I think I can help you with a simple technique on piano to find some chords that work together. I should stress that this is method will limit the chords available to you, and limit you to just a few keys, but limiting yourself can be great for ...


3

I agree with Tim's answer, but I'd like to add that you shouldn't think of it as changing chords. What you're doing (i.e. playing this on two strings) is actually correct and it's not like 'getting away' with something, but that's all that's to it. It's a line imposed over a chord: the chord is a dominant seventh chord (i.e. in a basic blues either the I7, ...


3

There are lots of theory and technological reasons why this works, but I think the question is about its effect on the listener. The #V (or #V7,rather than #Vmaj7)) can be thought of as the dominant of #I - as in heralding a key change rather than a modulation.Most listeners would expect the song to go up in pitch. What a surprise when it doesn't. The change ...


3

Maybe because Gdim7 is the same thing as C♯dim7? That means that, between the C♯m7 and the F♯m7, two notes are going to be held from the first chord, mainly C♯ and E, and there is going to be descending chromatic motion in parallel minor thirds between G♯ and B in the C♯m7, and F♯ and A in the F♯m7, because the remaining two notes of the C♯dim 7 are G and ...


3

All chord progressions can be labelled by the degree of the chord within the scale. Most chord progressions will contain the I, IV and V major chords. They also may contain a ii, iii, or vi minor chord or a diminished 7th. Some chord progressions will contain other variants but every key has only certain type chords that can be derived from the notes in ...


3

The nature of any diminished chord is going to be harsh as just the natural spelling of the chord outlines the tritone used in it. Simple voice leading and making sure the tritone does not show up in the outer voices. This is why it is rather typical to see a diminished chord in an inversion As to why going from iim75b to bVII7 and vii° to V7 you have to ...


3

When you swap the G for the E, you get rid of a perfect 5th and get a major 3rd. That 5th is being played anyway on fret 5, D string. You end up with: Root Minor 3rd Major 3rd Perfect 5th If you want to see it strictly as a minor C chord, the E is a major 10th tension. This tension is not diatonic to any minor mode from the major scale, so it is an ...


3

To understand how chords with 7ths work, you need to know the scale you are using. The chords most commonly used are built on thirds, so if you choose a scale and then a note from that scale, you'll see what chords are maj7 chords, by ascending thirds from the note you chose. * In the major scale, only the I and IV are major chords and have a major 7th. ...


2

A complete Cm11 chord is: C Eb G Bb D F, i.e. the 7th and 9th are implied. This does not mean, however, that you always have to actually play them. The 9th can be left out, and the 5th is very often left out because it doesn't add much color to the chord. On the guitar there are two voicings that are used a lot (from low to high): 8 x 8 8 6 x, i.e. C Bb Eb ...


2

A standard triad with a bass note a tone higher than the root is often called an 11th.(Off the bass note name). Bb, D and F make up a Bb major triad, and the C is a tone above Bb. So it can be known as C11. The intro to 'Midnight at the Oasis' uses 5 of these 11th chords. Otherwise known as Bb/C, but, as the others have said, it's not a sus4 in its common ...



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