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14

The simplest metric, and probably the most frequently used (even if only implicitly), is to count the number of steps between the chords' roots along a one-dimensional line of fifths (or the circle of fifths, if you permit enharmonics and modular arithmetic). I say this is the most frequently used because chord progressions where the root ascends or descends ...


8

The Ma symbol is typically used to denote a major chord as in FMa7 (F-A-C-E) or FMa(F-A-C) , but this chord is not an F major chord because there ia no major 3rd which is A in this case. The chord depicted seems to be quintal in nature (built in 5ths) as from the bottom up we have the notes F - C - G - D and then the G and C repeat. This chord is almost an ...


7

You are correct, the piece is in E major. If you use roman numerals to represent the chords, the progression can be written as: I - III - vi - V The reason that the III chord is major, when it should normally be minor is that it is in fact acting as the "dominant" (V chord) of the following C♯m (vi). It's almost as if you were temporarily shifting ...


6

Most players probably don't play full chords above 12th fret; however, you could try using fewer fingers, as in for an E shaped chord, using one finger on 5th and 4th strings, similarly on A shaped chords, play with 2 or 3 fingers - a barre over all 6, and a mini barre over 4,3 and 2. Just playing 3 or 4 notes out of particular chords works well, too, as ...


5

This is a big part of voice leading specifically where you look for common tones between chords in the harmony and how you can take advantage of them when transitioning between them. It's not really a formula as much as it is just assessing how related the two chords are. The basic idea is to just look what notes if any are common and if the notes move by ...


5

A common place for this to occur is IV to iv, often then returning to I, which makes (in your F key) the Db a semitone from C, and Bb a semitone from A, both found in the F chord. The F, of course, remains static. It's the same sort of semitone pull that makes V7 work so well as a dominant, to I. 'Major to minor' is one way to describe it. Ironically, in ...


5

The short answer is - DO NOT give up on playing guitar just because your fingers aren't optimally configured. You can adapt and learn to play quite well - if you really want to! Unfortunately not all of us who aspire to learn to play guitar are blessed with long slender fingers. But if you have a strong desire to play, you can overcome whatever ...


4

Chord inversion simply refers to which note is in the bass (i.e., the lowest note). We start in root position with the root in the bass: for a C major chord, C is the lowest note. If we imagine a simple C-E-G triad, then we can "invert" the chord by moving the C up an octave, getting E-G-C, with E (the third) in the bass. This is first inversion. We do ...


4

The chord basic progression I - VI - IV - II - V - I has been around almost as long as tonal music. Pop song writers have used it hundreds of times, and so did Mozart. In the key of F, that is F - Dm - Bb - Gm - C - F. Add a few 7ths if you want, of course. But you can precede almost any chord with its "secondary dominant". The dominant of Dm is A, so F - ...


4

Putting on my mathematician hat, the notion of distance is dependent upon many factors. The real question is what is it that you are looking for when you say distance? Do you mean that you are looking for harmonic similarity? Do you mean some sort of measure of auditory similarity? Do you mean how they relate on the circle of 5ths? The construct of a ...


3

If you see it from a pure classical standpoint, a 6th can never be a part of a chord-signature. Every chord is built by adding another 3rd to its predecessor note - starting from the root note. So you only get 1 3 5 7 9 11 13... Even a chord like e.g. C6 is interpreted as a minor 7th chord with the 3rd of the chord as root -> A C E G (1 3 5 7) -> C E G A (3 ...


3

As others have stated there is a temporary modulation. But the particular change you are referring to (IV to iv) actually comes from the Harmonic Major Scale. The scale was named by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. For instance a C harmonic major scale consists of the notes C D E F G Ab B (C). Contrary to the usual (ionian) major scale: C D E F G A B. Some good ...


3

Context is always important when naming chords as many chords can be named multiple ways. When given a choice between a chord like Am7/C or C6 the default is to call it a C6 for a good reason because have the bass note be perceived as the root is very typical rather than assume the chord is in first inversion. In almost every case those two chords serve ...


3

I agree with @MattPutnam's answer as far as chord inversions and close/open voicings are concerned, but I'd like to add an explanation of what drop voicings are. First of all, there are no "drop 2 chords", there are only drop 2 voicings of chords. The concept of drop voicings is often applied to four part chords. A drop voicing is obtained by dropping one ...


3

It's just a temporary modulation. In jazz and older pop music, this shows up frequently in a progression called "downstep modulation", where you have sequential iim-V7-Is a whole step lower, so for example: Am7-D7-GMaj7 Gmin7-C7-FMaj7, Fm7 ...


3

This progression immediately reminds me of Creep by Radiohead, though it is in C major, not F major. While there is no natural key containing F major and A major, these two chords together are very common in most genres, but especially in rock, which loves minor to major substitutions. D minor is the relative minor of F major, and while the key of D minor ...


3

FWIW: to me, a jazzy accompaniment like that rather ruins such a minimalistic spiritual as Amazing Grace. I would in fact prefer a bordun G! But to answer why chord changes make sense – often there's a simple reason: some parts of the melody are in dissonance with the tonic. In Amazing Grace that's actually not the case, but in many pieces changing ...


3

Could be a few things to look at, with the best/most likely at the top Finger and hand positions, experiment with different techniques until you find a perfect hand position/shape for EVERY chord you are getting bum notes with that reduces the chances of a bad sound, trying alternate places and or missing out notes to get a chord that sounds best Have ...


2

Google has been my friend to at least establish that I'm not the only one with this problem :) It isn't so much making the chord, but doing so without compromising either the high E or the Bb. Even professionals tend to either duck the high E in order to get a nice full C7 (including John Williams, yes check it out!), or stretch to the high E and partially ...


2

There a lot one can do when writing creating a progression to introduce chords that would not necessarily be found in within the same key. In fact, There isn't a key that naturally contains both an F major chord and an A major chord, but I'll focused on the chords you're interested in which is the Bb major and the Bb minor. For simplicity let's say these ...


2

Here's what I was taught by my teacher with regards to solo piano when I was first starting off with him. It is a method to play solo piano with the chord spread out between both hands and the melody as the top note of the chord. It's definitely not the only approach to this, but it is a systematic approach that really helped me. Let's say you're playing ...


2

You've lots of low notes at your disposal! Just use them with l.h. and put the top parts of the chords in with r.h. Assuming you're accompanying a soloist of some sorts. If not, then you'll have to maybe arpeggiate 1,5 etc. with l.h. and some sparse chords along the melody with r.h.


2

Well there is a chord that fits that description if you look at it that way, but you would never call it that. The actual chord is an augmented major 7th chord which built on C would be a C+M7. With a root of C it is spelled C, E, G#, B which can be respelled E, G#, B, C. The reason why you'll never see it called an E b6 is one it look way too much like ...


1

One answer about b6 chords is that they are ALMOST ALWAYS mis-identified as such. In almost every real book/fake book/chart, if you see a b6 chord it has an enharmonic equivalent spelling that makes far more sense in the harmony analysis than the b6 chord spelling does.


1

If you're going to call it C6, it's because it's in a sequence where C is more predominant than A, for instance, in a sequence C, C6, Cma7, C6. If it was preceded by the dom.5 of A,(E), it would then take the mantle of Am7. If it was, say, C6, 1st inversion, thus, in isolation, could be either, then the chords either side would dictate technically what it's ...


1

There is a best way to do this, and it's the accepted practise in jazz, I've taught this lots and watched it work. You need to drill all keys changing roots and chords in every possible permutation, starting with the most common movements. You put on a metronome, and you play em. Start as slow as you need to in order to get through all keys with no hiccups. ...


1

The question is "what's the best way..." The answer requires a tiny bit of setup: In the past, musicians were well-versed in reading sheet music and had a decent understanding of at least simple functional harmony. Today, that "baseline" level of knowledge has been eroded by the use of tablature and other "rote" notations, which by simplifying the ...


1

A friend o' mine did the double barre in a song many years ago and I was like, "Whoa, what's that?" He showed me and I went home and practiced it until my fingers ached, then practiced more. It's great to have that major chord at such a quick flick from the majors above it G to C, A to D, etc.. Nice for speed songs like punk rock too. Attack it and ...


1

Your answer is fine. The books answer is fine. Jazz. Altered dominants. You could also call b13 a #5. avoiding the altered fifth nomenclature may indicate the 5th is included E.g. #11 might indicate inclusion of the fifth. While b5 mans no unaltered fifth. Same goes for b13 vs #5 b9 and #9 are also used on some altered dominants - These indicate not ...


1

Not knocking bagpipe music in any way, but since the drones stay the same, as they don't change notes, the tunes played effectively stay on the same chord. This means that sometimes the melody line doesn't seem to fit exactly, but that's part of the nature of bagpipe tunes (there's probably a word for them - skirls?) and also the reason they don't seem to ...



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