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7

My answer is ultimately similar to Bob Broadley's, but has one difference that can make for much more readable scores in slightly more complex situations. This is the standard notation for broken held chords like the one you describe, as recommended by Kurt Stone and Gardner Read: The difference here is that you don't rewrite any of the held notes until ...


7

Learning production is like learning any musical instrument in a lot of ways. You first need to practice a lot to become very familiar with your software. The software is your instrument, you need to know it inside and out to become proficient at creating songs. For instruments, daily practice is the fastest way to improve, and the same goes with digital ...


5

"Musical Theater" is as broad of a category as they come. From the almost primitively classical works of Gilbert and Sullivan to modern avant garde styles that defy analysis, and every classical and popular style in between. You'll need to specify a composer or show that you want to sound similar to in order to get a specific answer. One thing I'll point ...


4

Led Zeppelin was impressive for many reasons, including the fact that they relied on musicianship and live performance to produce live arrangements of heavily produced and overdubbed songs that everyone knows. They did not use extra players, recorded tracks, or excessive harmonizers to do more than four players could do with their own four mouths, eight ...


4

I wasn't clear what your question really was to be honest, but I think you were asking how you create such colourful sounding chords, so I've added that question and I'll try to answer it a little bit here. There are 3 aspects I'd like to talk about, but they both stem from a similar concept of dissonant. When you hear a single tone, what your ear is ...


3

I think that starting with C and G chords is a throwback from other instruments, particularly the piano, so things could be learnt easily on the 'white keys'. There are none on a guitar, and initially sharps and flats don't need mentioning. Changing from C to G (and vice versa) involve a big change or finger/hand/arm movement with open chords. Not easy or ...


3

If you want better support than managing a linear history (like being able to merge branches with variants), then you need to work with some plain-text based file format. Naked XML will probably be at best so-so for merging. LilyPond is able to work with tablature output and has the advantage that it is easy to generate high quality normal scores if you ...


3

I agree, these are somewhat dubious designations, but there's a possible justification for looking at them more or less as analyzed in your example, in increasing order of dubiousness. The first example is actually just a deceptive resolution of the secondary dominant, akin to a primary V7 going to vi. V7/vi in C major is an E7 chord that wants to go to A ...


3

Sometimes it will be obvious to a performer that you need to sustain notes that together outline one particular harmony (a single triad, for instance). If you want to make this explicit, though, you could use notation such as the following: I'm not sure that this is used that much in piano music, probably because the pedal will produce the required effect ...


3

The thumb can be used to mute, but there is absolutely no rule about what you 'should' do, unless you are trying to play strict classical. In your D/F# I probably wouldn't mute the A with my thumb, but I might if it made sense based on where my fingers had come from and where they were going next. For that A chord I wouldn't mute the E string at all - I ...


3

A polychord indicates an explicit superimposition of two or more chords, with full voicing, disallowing the omission of any notes. It is usually used to simplify the notation of an otherwise awkward chord symbol [think of Ebm7 over G, which could result in a bulky GMaj7(#9#11b13)], but can also make clear that the composer was thinking specifically about ...


2

I had issues with the G chord as well. Training myself in classical style for discipline requires the pinky to hold down the high E string. Like you, I was either muting the A string with my ring finger or muting the high E string because my pinky wasn't pushed down hard enough. In observing very carefully what I was doing, I noticed that rather than ...


2

The best software that I've heard of is Melodyne. It's capabilities are truly amazing and I think it will do what you want very well. Take a look. It's not cheap though but I think it has a free trial! http://www.celemony.com/en/melodyne/what-is-melodyne


2

I don't have a better answer than the first two, but based on your edit I can elaborate a bit on your options. It's possible we are still misunderstanding exactly what you are asking. The algorithm you described still works on guitar, but only once you have memorized where every note on the neck is. On piano its easier because a "C" always looks like a "C" ...


2

The first statement just isn't true. It really needs a player to use whichever part of the fretting fingers/thumb/hand he is comfortable with. Barre chords will have to utilise the soft parts of fingers, so just tips/tops won't do much of a job. Whilst some players will use a thumb over the top of the neck to play lower strings, in D/F# it's best to play it ...


2

To my ear, the measure sounds like descending diminished 7th chords. Beats 1 and 2 f# diminished 7th and beats 3-4 d diminished 7th. (I'm not sure how Pat gets a d half-diminished chord with that c-flat so prominent, but maybe I've misread it.) On the first beat the g and b-flat are suspensions from the previous measure, which resolve down chromatically. ...


2

Interesting segment. I think that the second half of the measure can be heard as a D-diminished-7th in third inversion, and thus functions pretty normally as vii-dim-4/2 leading to the I6/4 of the following measure that isn't in your example. The Db in the top voice admittedly complicates that analysis, but I don't think it's dispositive. The first half of ...


2

To help you out: I've been figuring out how to make good "EDM" for many years now, and some of the things I've realized about it might be helpful to you. "Normal" music is different than dance music in a number of ways, although they're starting to swap traits in the past few years. 1) Almost all dance music NEVER progresses. What I mean is that there is ...


2

There are two basic rules of thumb for chords. You always want your harmony to reflect your melody so if the melody you are harmonizing has a 9th, 11th, or 13th of the chord you are playing in it it would be easy to use it in a chord. Look for common tones and chromatic movement between chords in a progression that will help lead to other chords in your ...


2

This question will probably get closed soon but the song is "Life in Technicolours"


2

Instead of C/G/D I'd probably start them with Am7, Em, Em7 and CMaj7. They offer interesting sounding chords, are absolutely simple to play and in the case of Am7 and CMaj7, you can transition directly to C and show them the relationship and why one finger makes all the difference. Once they get C, transition to G and so on. If it were me, I'd also start ...


1

When teaching students traditional guitar chords I would start with Em to Am. Students have issues starting on the C chord because of the stretch with the third finger on fifth string. Using Em with second and third fingers to Am, using same fingers and adding the first on the second string first fret, I see more success introducing chords. Use C Major ...


1

The first thing you need to consider is this: What kind of music are you playing? The use of the extended chords differ from genre to genre. If for instance you are playing a Bach song, it would be hard to find an extended chord, unless the 9th,11th or 13th note exists from a previous chord. In Jazz, generally 9th,11th and 13th chords are really common; ...


1

I recommend The Jazz Piano Book by Mark Levine for a fuller explanation of this, but there are some guidelines. In a Western Music context, you can add a 2 or 9 to just about any chord. A true 9th chord also includes the flatted 7th. That chord is most commonly used as a dominant, so a G9 in the key of C, A9 in the key of D, F9 in the key of Bb, etc. The ...


1

I'll explain why why Gdim7 works so well. The notes contained in Gdim7 are G, Bb, Db(C#), and Fb(E). One of the properties of a fully diminished 7th chord is because it is symmetric chord, it can function as a Gdim7, Bbdim7, Dbdim7 (C#dim7), or Fbdim7 (Edim7). Since C# is the leading tone of D major/D minor this chord acts as a dominant chord to the Dm chord ...


1

It is probably best that you write what you want above the first measure then write (sim.) if it continues in the other measures as shown below. If there isn't a simple way to notate something you can use a few words to describe it.


1

The "Cruel but Fair" school of hard knocks would say... Try, try, try again & if at first you don't succeed... try again... [or give up, the choice is yours.] ..& if, after another 10 years, you still get no takers - then either you have a) no talent whatsoever or b) no-one has yet recognised it. It is almost impossible right now to say which that ...


1

To play the chord D/F#, and pretty much anything that involves using my thumb to fret or mute, I usually keep the webbing between my thumb and index fingers wrapped around the neck, so I can bend my thumb over the top. I keep my hand/palm in pretty close contact to the neck- not tight, you don't have to squeeze.. it's hard to describe, but something like ...


1

By definition all chords are "complete" if they have 3 or more notes performed at the same time. But depending on how it is used (ie is there a pedal, chords/melody coming from and progressing to etc...) will help you understand its function and therefore can help you in naming it. Function can be thought of as chords that sound at rest or chords that sound ...


1

Ableton Live has a feature built in called "Harmony-to-MIDI" where it analyzes an audio track (could be piano, guitar, whole song.. anything) and it outputs a MIDI sequence replicating the chords played in the piece. It even chooses the closest sounding synth patch to match the source. Also available is Melody-to-MIDI and Rhythm-to-MIDI. I'm not much of a ...



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