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12

These are frequency ratios. The first digit is the common denominator (10). In a deminished seventh the following ratios are present: 12/10 = 6/5 = minor third 14/10 = 7/5 ~ sqrt(2) ~ diminished fifth 17/10 : this is trickier In a diminished seventh chord the fourth note is a diminished seventh, which is enharmonic to the major sixth (whose frequency is ...


11

Like you and others said, the main reason of using power chords is to avoid the intermodulation distortion: Thirds sound muddy with distortion. I think that they generally have two functions in rock music. One function is to use it as a substitute for a triad. Here, the third is generally implied. But it may be played by a solo guitar or sung by the ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


10

It's an Eb6/9 chord with a G in the bass. A major 6/9 chord is a chord that has the basis of a major triad and has a major 6th and a major 9th(major 2nd) in it without a 7th. The spelling is Eb G Bb C F. The full chord symbol would be Eb6/9/G. Also as a side note, it would be difficult for this chord to function as a dominant as the leading tone of C ...


10

It would be a G9sus4. It could technically also be F6/9/G but that would look very confusing on a lead sheet. When naming a chord you have to look at what you have and what you are missing. You have the notes G F A C D. While there is an F major triad, having a G as the bass doesn't make it feel like a chord based off F major because it is rare to put a ...


10

This chord progression is extremely common in a lot of rock, pop and R&B music and is usually called bVI–bVII–I (where the b's are flat signs). In other words, the A major triad is generally taken as defining A major as the overriding key, but the preceding chords are taken to be major triads built on the lowered sixth and seventh scale degrees. Bob ...


7

With practice, you'll eventually be able to listen to a passage of music a few times, recognise what the relationships between pitches are, and then notate it straight onto manuscript paper, but this skill takes time to develop. To start with, use an instrument to play along with the audio files, to help you work out the music. Piano is ideal for this, but ...


7

Cmaj7#5 to C doesn't sound far fetched at all. In the end, if something sounds good - use it! But, if something sounds good, there will usually be an explanation for why it works... In this case, Cmaj7#5 is a chord containing chromatic tension, that "wants" to resolve to something simpler. In particular, the two chromatic alterations to the chord (B, the ...


6

Bagpipes come close, even though their drones are at a pitch and its octave. The harmonics come into play here (pun intended), because every instrument produces not only the fundamental note that we think we hear, but some/lots of others too.Each instrument will have particular overtones, partials or harmonics that it will produce in different proportions. ...


5

As you said, the first four chords can be understood as chords from E mixolydian. Note that from then on the chords follow a downward movement in minor thirds (at least enharmonically): E => C# => A#/Bb => G and from there to B, the V of E. The downward movement in minor thirds is equivalent to going from a minor scale to its relative major scale (and that's ...


5

As the other answers have said, a secondary dominant is a 7th chord that resolves to a chord other than the tonic. The classic example is a D7 chord in the key of C: the D7 resolves to G, which itself resolves to C. Dominants create tension To understand the theory and practice behind secondary dominants, you have to understand that all dominant chords ...


5

In a given key, there are basically 3 main major and three main minor chords found in the underlying harmonies. Majors are I, IV and V. Minors are ii, iii and vi.This will translate in C to be C,Dm,Em,F,G and Am.Those chords will cover many, many songs and tunes from many genres, in Western music. First to establish is the tonic - the key chord of a piece. ...


4

In my experience, to avoid this confusion, people generally treat the chord-scale as a giant chord, naming each of its notes as if it were part of the chord. root, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and so on. In other words, the "2" would be referred to as a 9 regardless of if it's inside the voicing or above it. This would give rise to the feeling that "scale ...


4

The voicings possible for piano chords are not always easy to play on guitar. Sometimes they may not be possible at all. There is a simple reason for this. Piano chords are easy to play when the notes are close together, and become somewhat harder as the notes are further apart. Guitar chords, on the other hand, become harder to play, as the notes become ...


4

F6/G is one choice.G9sus4 is another. And because Dm7 has exactly the same 4 notes as F6, Dm7/G is another.As the piece is in C, any would do, although it would be helpful if the name it used was a V of the next chord. (Cycle of 4ths/5ths).


4

I would definitely say that the most important notes in the chord in this regard are the first and last note, but the bass note more likely will have the most power within the context of a song. I would guess if the bass note is moving up (like, lets say bass is playing A, B, C, D, the movement of the progression would have a higher sound... as in, it would ...


4

There's the standard root-3rd-5th making a root position, then 1st inversion with 3rd-5th-root up an octave, and 2nd inversion, with 5th at the bottom-root (up an octave from original)-3rd(up as well).Go up another step and it's back to root. As there are so many combinations of the three notes available on several instruments, I don't believe there is a ...


4

Interesting harmonies can often be produced by moving a single chord shape/type around (transposing it), rather than by strictly using chords within a particular mode, scale or key. One example that has always fascinated me, for instance, is transposing major chords by the intervals in a minor pentatonic scale, something that is often done in pop/rock music. ...


4

When in doubt, refer to the first rule of composition: If it sounds cool, it’s right. However, there’s also a sound theoretical basis for what you’re doing here. The common V–IV–I–I blues turnaround has the same problem as your song when leading back into another I chord, and the solution is similar. In blues, you usually substitute in a V chord at the end ...


4

It's certainly possible for these notes to resolve to the I. Only, I'd argue what you have there is not so much Imaj7(♯5) as Imaj7(♭6)... and immediately it makes sense. For that chord is basically just V♭9 plus a I pedal bass note. If you ignore the pedal and add an F, since you omit the G note it's simply the standard diminished seventh ...


3

I would venture that ONE of the functions of a power chord is to provide an open melodic soloing space. I recall an interview with Eric Johnson in which he referred to fifth/power chords as "open chords" -- meaning that the soloing space over the chord was unrestricted. That was a different perspective than I had ever used for that terminology(*). I concede ...


3

I think 'chordal' is the term you're searching for. As in that G would be a 'chordal minor third'. Chordal coming from 'of the chord'.As opposed to its place in the parent scale of 'dominant'note.


3

You don't need any programs for this. Just use an extensive chart like the one on chordie.com: link.


3

I suppose you're asking about what the largest named chord is. You can have a chord with as many pitches as you like, across the whole range of the instruments playing that chord, and of course even more if you are using quarter-tones and micro-tones (as you say in your question). However, as you also say, the largest number of different pitches you could ...


3

In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


3

There is one overarching reason it's not a G11 chord, and that's because it's missing the third. You need to have a major 3rd and flat 7 in there for it to be any part of the G dominant family, those are the defining notes. So G7, G9, G11, G13, none of those can be voiced missing the B or F, no matter what. After that point, it's arguing enharmonics as to ...


3

You will overcome this by practising, but you don't need to worry about it just yet. It's not that common to need to play all six strings barred. Concentrate at first on the two most common barred shapes - the "A shape" (for example, a barred Bb) and the "E shape" (for example, a barred F). With both of these shapes you barre across six strings, and fret 3 ...


3

possible voicings of a 3 note chord include those 3 halfsteps in ANY and ALL of the 7.3 octaves. your example is ok for when the 1,3,5 are only used once. But maybe you want 3 separate bass notes in 3 of the lower octaves, plus a 3rd in octave 4, and 2 5ths in octaves 5 and 6. You could have that 3 note chord playing on 21-ish possible notes or any ...


3

Theory Secondary Dominants are chords that are the Dominant (V) chord of a certain key other than the Tonic (I) key. For example, let the current key be C Major. An F Major chord is the Subdominant (IV) of the current key (C Major). How about a C Dominant 7th chord? That is not in the current key, but you know it's the Dominant 7th (V7) of F Major, and F ...


3

Figure out the key. As Tim points out, it's usually the final chord of the song. Use the harmonized scale to find all the possible chords. A "harmonized scale" is just the scale of the key with chords played instead of the notes. For C major, the harmonized scale is C Dm Em F G Am Bdim 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Figure out the roots of the chords played in the ...



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