Hot answers tagged

6

All new strings need a good stretch to allow them to bed in. The metal itself has to stretch a little, the windings round the post have to settle and the neck has to re-adjust to the tension change. Along each string, pull and push, but not like you'd pull a bow (and arrow). Lift up and push down a couple of inches away from each other - it's not easy to ...


6

It's a really round about way of notating a G7sus4. The + is telling you to raise the note and the 3 is referring to the third of the chord so it's telling you to raise the 3rd. Since a raised major 3rd is just a 4th you'll typically see this chord as just G7sus4 which tells you to play a G7 with a 4th instead of a 3rd. If you even search the chord symbol ...


4

First thing which comes to my mind is that you get a (rootless) D-9 when you play FM7, so you add color to your chord (the 9th). And if you play the root in the melody, you don't "lose" a voice by doubling a note. The second thing is that playing the rootless chords, especially when playing standards, change the feeling of the chord progression: playing ...


4

There are no chords that has a diminished second as part of the chord for the obvious reason that the enharmonic equivalent of it would be a perfect unison which is already part of every chord. If you do come across one, just view it as a unison instead of a second as that's almost surely how it's being used.


4

I'll borrow the arpeggio definition from wikipedia: An arpeggio (Italian: [arˈpeddʒo]) is a musical technique where notes in a chord are played or sung in sequence, one after the other, rather than ringing out simultaneously. So, let's say you have the C major chord, which consists of the notes C-E-G. If you play these 3 notes together, they will form ...


3

Strictly speaking an arpeggio is played in strict note order like a scale, but more informally people use it to describe playing a chord in a broken order rather than all at once. With guitar you can hold a chord and play the notes(strings) in any order and it should sound reasonably ok. All the notes will harmonise. You want to allow the strings to carry ...


3

It's hard to be sure, but I believe the parentheses just indicate that the empty d string can be played at this point, but needn't. Note that d-string on 5th fret gives you the same note already; doubling it on the g-string will merely add some extra grit (but possibly the result will rather be muddy and undefined, due to extra empty-string vibrations).


2

No. But, I can think of two (theoretical) chords, both would have to be inverted. A chord with a doubly diminished ninth, for example, C-E-G-Bb-Dbb. A fully diminished vii chord with either an added flat-ninth or an extra minor third on top, for example, C#-E-G-Bb-Db. The reason you won't see these as functional chords is because of how they would have ...


2

It could be the set up of the guitar, but it could also be the fact that you let the pressure off the strings too slowly and for too long. This gives the sound of a well pressed down string a chance to buzz. Try to hold on to each note, or each note of a chord, until you're just ready to change to the next. Then get there as quickly as you can. It won't ...


1

It's a matter of voicing: many chord changes happen by just changing few notes slightly. If there is a dedicated bass note keeping track of the respective root, it tends to jump around a lot, not maintaining a melodic line of its own. Omitting such a bass line makes the resulting changes more subtle and work on their own, like reciting a poem without ...


1

Depending on how much the audience is used to the type of music being played, it can "hear" the root although it's not there. As if the player was saying "I don't play the root D there, but you know what I mean". The context helps pretending the root was there. A bit like when someone is playing a very minimalistic version of a standard tune, if the ...


1

There are a number of cases where it's possible to think of chords from different perspectives. One example would be the way that a C major 6th chord and an A minor 7th chord have the same notes in, but in different contexts it might make more sense to think of the chord as one or the other. Another example would be when modulating, say using a common chord ...


1

If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


1

Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


1

There are some common ones that will crop up again and again in almost all pop genres and I hear these in house quite a lot: (these are in Am or C for simplicity) C | G | Am | F Am | F | C | G C | G | Em | F F | G | Am | Am Am | C | Em | D By examination you can see the general theme is using C, Am, and F. 1, 3, 6 or 1, 4, 6 in the case of C progressions. ...


1

Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...


1

Well first of all, kudos to you for hearing the problem and wanting to improve. So the overall answer of course is the speed at which you change fingerings, and this is something that will improve naturally over time as long as you continue to HEAR the problem and focus on improving. But there are also techynical adjustments and tricks you can use. There are ...


1

You give us neither the G7 > C or E7 > Am cadences that would answer your question conclusively. Which way will you choose to end the piece of which this is an excerpt? Neither you or you friend is wrong, or right!


1

Check out this link for a good resource on arpeggios. There are literally thousands of picking patterns for arpeggios. As a general rule though instead of strumming or playing the notes of a chord together. (Like this) You pick the notes one at a time in some sort of pattern. (Like this) (OR this) SOURCE:



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible