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0

The interval just refers to the distance between two notes. This is the same irregardless of what key you may be in. C - E is a Major Third in a minor as well as C major. You have there a list of chords and what type they are. This is not the same as the Key signature.


2

If you want to make a nice piece of music (which I presume you do, simply encoding pi would seem a bit wasteful), I'd avoid trying to generate the music mechanically, and instead use pieces of pi as inspiration. For instance: Writing it in 22/7 (an approximation of pi) Using the first 5 or so digits as a motif in some way, and using the others not as ...


0

The Cø7 is also known as Cmin7b5, spelled 1-b3-b5-b7. The C°7 is spelled 1-b3-b5-bb7. (It comes from the harmonic minor scale.) You may frequently find the ø in jazz tunes, however the °7 is less common because it is loaded with tension. An interesting feature of the °7 is that it is symmetric -- any of its four voices may be treated as its root. That ...


1

A half-diminished chord has a root, minor 3rd, diminished 5th and a minor 7th (eg. A C Eb G). The minor 7th is implicit in a half-diminished chord. So it is not necessary to include the 7 after the half-diminished sign (ø). And so, yes, both notations will refer to the same chord. In other words if a chord is named, for example, Cø7, the 7 is redundant. A ...


1

There are three types of diminished chords, Cø and Cø7 are the same. Some people just notate the chords slightly differently because how they learned the chords. A diminished triad is denoted with just a °, i.e. C°, and it contains a root, a minor third and a diminished 5th. A half diminished seventh is denoted with a ø and it is also common to see a ø7 ...


0

There's no reason you have to stay within one octave. You can use, for instance, C-D-E-F-G-A-B-c-d-e for your digits. So the first five notes are E-C-F-C-G-d, for example This has the advantage of being extremely intuitive to any musician, since you'd just be referring to scale degrees in C major (with 10 being 0). I can personally just sit there and read ...


4

Pi can also be expressed through various infinite series. I like François Viète series discovered in 1593: Square root from 2 is half octave distance. Maybe it is possible to represent the series as some sequence of sounds? Or maybe some other series would fit better? This might reproduce the spirit of Pi even better than replaying its decimal ...


1

Other answers have suggested using different bases. For an event in the Physics department, I did play pi in quintal, and there is a video. The sheet was generated using a script and Lilypond. Bonus: also in octal, but this one is not annotated.


3

Why use base 10? You have to make some compromise somewhere, and since π is already transcendental, there is no rational radix that will accurately represent π. If you use heptary, π ≈ 3.0663651432036134110263402244652226643520650240155443215426431025161154565220002622436103301443233631. These digits map perfectly to the seven pitches in an octave. Using ...


0

As a programmer, I love this idea and of course I thought about this as well already but didn't have any time yet to try this out :). Basically, I believe your line with notes is incorrect. You should start by choosing a key in which you want to write it. I believe your key would be Am, or is it a coincidence? I would work with something like this: ...


4

One Idea I haven't seen mentioned is rhythm. Perhaps you can use some of the spare digits as a change in pace (f.e. switch from eights to quavers). Or you could map the spare digits to pre-conceived rhythmic motives. Another idea would be to use the digits that are not mapped to a note to switch instrument. HTH.


2

An option which no one has really mentioned is to use those extra digits for special purposes (ie Change tempo, another instrument). If the primary instrument is a piano, I'd imagine that simply assigning a digit to the snare, bass and cymbal would add a lot of flair to your final music. In fact, adding new instruments will open you up to a bunch of new ...


20

One option if you're primarily interested in representing the individual digits of pi is to use a representation in a base other than 10. For example pi base 12 would have an individual digital for each chromatic note. Here's a website that might help get you started: http://www.virtuescience.com/pi-in-other-bases.html


12

The number 10 doesn't necessarily map well to values in traditional musical theory. (For instance, there are 12 chromatic pitches per octave, using conventional divisions of the octave; diatonic scales have seven pitches; note durations are related as powers or negative powers of 2). So, for this reason, the world is your oyster! I guess you can choose any ...


1

Simple explanation: If you have the C major scale: C D E F G A B If you would want to create a chord (let's say E). You would have to use the notes from this C major scale (while playing in C). As normally, a E chord has the notes E G# and B (triad). Since we don't have a G# in our C major scale (and we are playing in C!), we need to swap the G# for a G. ...


1

There are minor scales for the same reason that there are major scales, or Blues scales, or Klezmer scales: somebody in the past found those scales useful for making what they thought was good-sounding music, and somebody else agreed and used those scales also, and taught them to students, who made even more minor, major, Blues, Klezmer scale music, and then ...


12

When you say "Why are the key signatures in the major key like this", you are misusing the words "key signature", so let's start by explaining that. A key is a combination of: a choice of root note a choice of which set of notes are available to be played In traditional Western music -- the musical tradition in which "major" and "minor" makes sense -- a ...


1

But the C7 (or any 7 chord) is based off of the major scale. It's the V degree of the major scale. So for C major, the V is G7. This is because the V is the only degree that has a major 3rd but a minor 7th. The 7 chord is also known as a dominant chord (so the V degree is known as the dominant of the scale). Based on the phrasing of your question ("the 7th ...


6

The most correct notation for a C7 chord would be C E G Bb and not C E G A#. Note that both Bb and A# are practically the same, but A is the 6th of C whereas B is the 7th of C. Those notes that sound the same but are written different are called Enharmonic notes. So, if you had a chord with these notes: C E A#, then that would be a C augmented sixth chord, ...


3

Okay, so you're talking about substitutions and passing chords in general. I'll try to handle both as best as I can. I'll deal with everything in C major as well. Substitutions Let's take a look at the most typical chords I, IV and V. Each chord in the key of C can be substituted with another chord. The I chord (CEG) can be substituted by VI(ACE) or ...


1

One, of many, reasons is that the melody line contains some of the notes that occur in the particular chord, especially notes on the 1st and 3rd beats (in 4/4 time). Generally an underlying chord reflects the notes in the melody at that point. As Bob says, a lot of the examples are not strictly within the C major framework, so there could be many more ...


1

Csus4 is used to suspend (delay) resolution to Cmajor (C6 or Cmaj7). Cdim7 is used as a passing chord from Cmajor to Dmin7, as in: Cmaj > Ebdim7 > Dmin7 Aflat has a dominant function in the key of C, so Ab is often used as a substitute for a dominant or subdominant chord, so instead of Cmaj > Fmaj > Cmaj you may use Cmaj > Abmaj > ...


4

If you're playing this style, I would suggest that instead of looking for a list of Freddie Green chords, you should procedurally construct all drop 2 chords using string set 6543. Freddie Green chords are merely drop2 chords on strings 6543, but with the note on string 5 always omitted to leave a little bit of space for the rest of the ensemble. (Straw ...


0

Here's an idea. A scale is every possible note for the melody. So for C major it's: C D E F G A B A chord on the other hand is every other note. So a C chord is: C E G A D minor chord is: D F A And all those fancy jazz chords are every other note as well. A C11 is: C E G B D E F only we throw out most of the notes that aren't C E or ...


1

A note about stems and beams: pianists often work with both hands in one register or area of the keyboard, and music notation tells the pianist which hand to use when, such as when hands are crossed over one another in playing a riff or string of notes. When that is the case, stems up tell the pianist to use the right hand, and stems down, the left hand.


5

It's not a different chord, and in terms of guitar I wouldn't even think of it as a different voicing. It's an inversion! That's what the term is for, to describe taking a particular chord structure and changing the order of notes so that a different note is on the bottom. Guitar voicings tend to have specific structures, like closed triad, spread triad, ...


0

The first inversion of a chord is considered to have the same function as the chord in root position. This is esp. true for the primary triads: tonic, subdominant and dominant. That said, the first inversion can help affirm the function of a secondary triad (substitution chord). For instance, in C major, both Am and Em are substitution chords of C, so ...


2

Dr Mayhame is right, but I'll explain a little more. If you have a C, E, G, and no other notes it is a C major chord no matter what order it is on, how far apart the notes are, or if notes are doubled. The only thing that changes is the voicing of the chord which can make the same chords sound totally different. The function of a chord changes depending on ...


6

It is not considered a different chord. The name is still the same, the notes are still the same, they are just in a different order - so they are effectively a different voicing. They will sound different, which is why inversions are used - you can impart a number of different flavours of sound to a piece of music.


0

You ask for a systematic method. If there is only tab to follow, unless you know all the note names on guitar, it's difficult. When the music is there too, it's easier, provided you can name the dots. Make a list of all the notes used, not including the accidentals with a #, b or natural before them. There should be 7, but not all notes are used in every ...


1

You have to hear the song in order to find the strumming pattern. The tabs don't give good rhythm indicators. Basically strumming on quarter notes is down on each beat. On eight notes down on the downbeat and up on the upbeat. Sixteenth notes would be down and up on each. Depending on the tempo it will vary as far as patterns. Get a feel for the rhythm by ...


1

There is a method in discovering the strums. In general you can air strum the entire time doing down, followed by up. If you follow the rhythm and only touch the strings when a chord is played in the song, you will get it. A nice example to discover this (but pretty hard), is Get Lucky. Check that rhythm guitar out :).


2

I was taught that when playing a triad, the third should be played sharper and the fifth flatter than the notes would normally sound. Uh, no? "Would normally sound" is usually used to describe the equally tempered scale whereas "playing a triad" implies a tendency towards pure intervals. A perfect major third is about 386 cents (14 cents flat from a ...


3

With tabs you need to know some theory first on how to determine the key by the chord progression. A quick and simple way to do this is to find the first and/or last chord of the song. But learn I - IV - V twelve bar blues and how to solo with pentatonics first before hitting the modes. You need to understand basic theory before you get into anything beyond ...


1

Depending which version of Fruity Loops you are using, there may be no need to look up the chords yourself. Here is a nice tutorial on how to use the chord tool that is built right in to FL Studio. If you are only seeing piano keys instead of the letter names of the notes, try hitting the M key while you are in the Piano Roll view and it should switch.


1

I disagree with the previous posters in that I think there are several good arguments with opposite conclusions. One way to look at it is that the name of a note should depend on how it is written. In this example, a Db is b5 (or b12) and a C# is #11, period. This is the standard practice in the world of classical theory. Another way to look at it (which ...


3

I would say that your answer is actually correct and the book is wrong in this case, and let me tell you why. It seems likely that this is a very modern book and that if they would say it is a #11, they wouldn't penalize you for writing the technical correct b5. Chords are based on scales. In a typical 7 note scale scale, you will write the intervals as so: ...


6

Not a stupid question at all! But, yes, only the bass note is taken into account when naming the inversion of a chord. The voicing above this is unimportant. Indeed, the bass note may be doubled, as can any other chord-tones. (Although, this may be inappropriate, if following the rules of specific styles of harmony or counterpoint.) Also, notes above the ...


2

If it's a #11 then it must be written as such. As a b12 it doesn't make sense, so the dots cannot be accurate.Otherwise we have anarchy. (Again).If you can make anything of this exercise, then maybe you're past this level!!


4

Use a filter. First Edit Filter in the Edit menu to apply copy paste only to Markings > Chords & Fretboards. Then set the menu Edit > Use Filter. Finally copy and paste and those actions will only apply to whatever is selected in the filter.


15

Adding a b9 to a major 7th chord creates a very dissonant sound because the chord then has two different notes that are a half step away from the root. The resolution would be tricky because the b9 would want to go down a half step and so would the 7th and the root needs to go somewhere. That being said however, I found a few voicing that sound good for it ...



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