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1

But the C7 (or any 7 chord) is based off of the major scale. It's the V degree of the major scale. So for C major, the V is G7. This is because the V is the only degree that has a major 3rd but a minor 7th. The 7 chord is also known as a dominant chord (so the V degree is known as the dominant of the scale). Based on the phrasing of your question ("the 7th ...


6

The most correct notation for a C7 chord would be C E G Bb and not C E G A#. Note that both Bb and A# are practically the same, but A is the 6th of C whereas B is the 7th of C. Those notes that sound the same but are written different are called Enharmonic notes. So, if you had a chord with these notes: C E A#, then that would be a C augmented sixth chord, ...


3

Okay, so you're talking about substitutions and passing chords in general. I'll try to handle both as best as I can. I'll deal with everything in C major as well. Substitutions Let's take a look at the most typical chords I, IV and V. Each chord in the key of C can be substituted with another chord. The I chord (CEG) can be substituted by VI(ACE) or ...


1

One, of many, reasons is that the melody line contains some of the notes that occur in the particular chord, especially notes on the 1st and 3rd beats (in 4/4 time). Generally an underlying chord reflects the notes in the melody at that point. As Bob says, a lot of the examples are not strictly within the C major framework, so there could be many more ...


1

Csus4 is used to suspend (delay) resolution to Cmajor (C6 or Cmaj7). Cdim7 is used as a passing chord from Cmajor to Dmin7, as in: Cmaj > Ebdim7 > Dmin7 Aflat has a dominant function in the key of C, so Ab is often used as a substitute for a dominant or subdominant chord, so instead of Cmaj > Fmaj > Cmaj you may use Cmaj > Abmaj > ...


4

If you're playing this style, I would suggest that instead of looking for a list of Freddie Green chords, you should procedurally construct all drop 2 chords using string set 6543. Freddie Green chords are merely drop2 chords on strings 6543, but with the note on string 5 always omitted to leave a little bit of space for the rest of the ensemble. (Straw ...


0

Here's an idea. A scale is every possible note for the melody. So for C major it's: C D E F G A B A chord on the other hand is every other note. So a C chord is: C E G A D minor chord is: D F A And all those fancy jazz chords are every other note as well. A C11 is: C E G B D E F only we throw out most of the notes that aren't C E or ...


1

A note about stems and beams: pianists often work with both hands in one register or area of the keyboard, and music notation tells the pianist which hand to use when, such as when hands are crossed over one another in playing a riff or string of notes. When that is the case, stems up tell the pianist to use the right hand, and stems down, the left hand.


5

It's not a different chord, and in terms of guitar I wouldn't even think of it as a different voicing. It's an inversion! That's what the term is for, to describe taking a particular chord structure and changing the order of notes so that a different note is on the bottom. Guitar voicings tend to have specific structures, like closed triad, spread triad, ...


0

The first inversion of a chord is considered to have the same function as the chord in root position. This is esp. true for the primary triads: tonic, subdominant and dominant. That said, the first inversion can help affirm the function of a secondary triad (substitution chord). For instance, in C major, both Am and Em are substitution chords of C, so ...


2

Dr Mayhame is right, but I'll explain a little more. If you have a C, E, G, and no other notes it is a C major chord no matter what order it is on, how far apart the notes are, or if notes are doubled. The only thing that changes is the voicing of the chord which can make the same chords sound totally different. The function of a chord changes depending on ...


6

It is not considered a different chord. The name is still the same, the notes are still the same, they are just in a different order - so they are effectively a different voicing. They will sound different, which is why inversions are used - you can impart a number of different flavours of sound to a piece of music.


0

You ask for a systematic method. If there is only tab to follow, unless you know all the note names on guitar, it's difficult. When the music is there too, it's easier, provided you can name the dots. Make a list of all the notes used, not including the accidentals with a #, b or natural before them. There should be 7, but not all notes are used in every ...


1

You have to hear the song in order to find the strumming pattern. The tabs don't give good rhythm indicators. Basically strumming on quarter notes is down on each beat. On eight notes down on the downbeat and up on the upbeat. Sixteenth notes would be down and up on each. Depending on the tempo it will vary as far as patterns. Get a feel for the rhythm by ...


1

There is a method in discovering the strums. In general you can air strum the entire time doing down, followed by up. If you follow the rhythm and only touch the strings when a chord is played in the song, you will get it. A nice example to discover this (but pretty hard), is Get Lucky. Check that rhythm guitar out :).


2

I was taught that when playing a triad, the third should be played sharper and the fifth flatter than the notes would normally sound. Uh, no? "Would normally sound" is usually used to describe the equally tempered scale whereas "playing a triad" implies a tendency towards pure intervals. A perfect major third is about 386 cents (14 cents flat from a ...


3

With tabs you need to know some theory first on how to determine the key by the chord progression. A quick and simple way to do this is to find the first and/or last chord of the song. But learn I - IV - V twelve bar blues and how to solo with pentatonics first before hitting the modes. You need to understand basic theory before you get into anything beyond ...


1

Depending which version of Fruity Loops you are using, there may be no need to look up the chords yourself. Here is a nice tutorial on how to use the chord tool that is built right in to FL Studio. If you are only seeing piano keys instead of the letter names of the notes, try hitting the M key while you are in the Piano Roll view and it should switch.


1

I disagree with the previous posters in that I think there are several good arguments with opposite conclusions. One way to look at it is that the name of a note should depend on how it is written. In this example, a Db is b5 (or b12) and a C# is #11, period. This is the standard practice in the world of classical theory. Another way to look at it (which ...


3

I would say that your answer is actually correct and the book is wrong in this case, and let me tell you why. It seems likely that this is a very modern book and that if they would say it is a #11, they wouldn't penalize you for writing the technical correct b5. Chords are based on scales. In a typical 7 note scale scale, you will write the intervals as so: ...


6

Not a stupid question at all! But, yes, only the bass note is taken into account when naming the inversion of a chord. The voicing above this is unimportant. Indeed, the bass note may be doubled, as can any other chord-tones. (Although, this may be inappropriate, if following the rules of specific styles of harmony or counterpoint.) Also, notes above the ...


2

If it's a #11 then it must be written as such. As a b12 it doesn't make sense, so the dots cannot be accurate.Otherwise we have anarchy. (Again).If you can make anything of this exercise, then maybe you're past this level!!


4

Use a filter. First Edit Filter in the Edit menu to apply copy paste only to Markings > Chords & Fretboards. Then set the menu Edit > Use Filter. Finally copy and paste and those actions will only apply to whatever is selected in the filter.


15

Adding a b9 to a major 7th chord creates a very dissonant sound because the chord then has two different notes that are a half step away from the root. The resolution would be tricky because the b9 would want to go down a half step and so would the 7th and the root needs to go somewhere. That being said however, I found a few voicing that sound good for it ...


2

The G chord in an A G D progression is the subtonic chord. It is a major triad built on the lowered 7th scale degree of the key. Technically it is considered a borrowed chord since the G major triad can be built from the notes of A natural minor. As mentioned above, many rock and pop songs use this progression: Hey Jude, Don't Stop Thinking About Tomorrow ...


3

Here's a simpler approach because I'm a simple guy who has to figure this stuff out on the bandstand. In pop music, I look for I-IV-V progressions which tend to identify the key of most pop songs. The A G D progression looks like a V-IV-I progression in the key of D. But the tune seems to indicate that it's in some mode of A. So to figure out the mode I ...


7

Okay, so there's a concept missing from this question which is the tonal center. That's just a fancy way of saying the root note, the note which all others gravitate to and resolve to, which would be A in the example of the chords you gave. Key is a bit more specific, and it is usually used to mean not only the tonal center but also the scale used to ...


4

For a classical orchestra the priority is, to be in tune with your voice group e. g. first violins. A voice group consists of same instruments, so no problem, they play as you've been teached. The instruments with discrete tuning are only a few (piano, celesta, marimbaphone, xylophone, organ come to my mind) and these are unlikely to have prominent sustained ...


1

Common name is a pause sign. In 'proper' music (written notes), it means hold the note for longer than the note indicates, as in a four beat note may be held for 5/6 beats. Usually found at the end of a piece, where the last chord lasts longer than it is marked, signifying 'the end'.Not usually found in the middle of a piece.


6

It's called a fermata. It means hold the chord for good long moment. If there are other instruments playing, they will all stop and hold the note together. The whole movement of time in the song takes a pause, just stretching out the single beat.


2

Adding to Dom's answer,yes, there will be more efficiency in changing chords, using barre chords. In a piece with quite a few changes, it's often possible to move from any chord to the next by moving two frets maximum, sometimes one fret, and even no frets at all.Take a simple 3 chord song in A. Play A on the 5th fret barre, with an 'E' shape. Same barre ...


6

Yes, if you move a barre chord to a different fret it becomes a different chord. The one you have used to get the F chord sounds like the E-shaped barre chord. There are a total of 5 different barre chord shapes and they are all based on the open shapes of chords. As you can see in the picture above, these are the 5 open chords and thus each can be ...


1

In fact it is possible to play chords with both hands and a melody at the same time. The trick is to play the melody as the brightest tone, and add one or two chord tones below it in the right hand. The left hand can play the entire chord or just the bas tone (maybe doubled in two octaves). - It is a bit tricky to teach the brain to automatically add chord ...



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