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2

re 1) I think what the text might mean is .. If the melody is the sung melody, you probably don't want to play it while you're singing it. You'd just be playing over your own singing. Normally this doesn't work too well.


4

If you're playing the chords with the right hand and your left hand is playing the bass line, you have a couple options. The book suggests that you sing to it, but somebody else can play the melody using another piano, sing, or even play it on instruments like the harmonica, violin, or saxophone, which can closely mimic the human voice. Piano sheet music ...


3

While you do sing many notes a chord is composed of at least 3 notes and forms the harmony to support the melody(the notes you sing). The chord being played will not only support the melody, but it will help give the song a tonal center. Any melody can have harmonic tones(chord tones) or non-harmonic tones(non-chord tones). A harmonic tone is a note in the ...


6

Good question! The answer requires at least a little music theory. Vocal melodies (or any melodies, for that matter) are likely to use the notes within accompanying chords to some extent. However, melodies are unlikely to only use notes within the accompanying harmony (chords). In fact, melodies would be rather dull if they did! Depending upon the style or ...


0

Get a hold of "George Van Eps Guitar Method" - buy it, find it on the interweb thing, check out triad exercises on ewetube. It is the ultimate foundation guide for triads that will open up the fretboard and unlock your hidden potential, the enabler to show music aficionados why you are on this planet.


3

I know how you feel Rich. Genres like jazz and gospel tend to use a lot of "weird" chords that don't fit into whatever the home key is. Knowing the bass note of the chord is crucial in my opinion. Sometimes people can't hear it and that makes chord identification difficult. If you can hear it, then it gives you a ton of info. Let's say the bass note is C. ...


3

Figure out the key. As Tim points out, it's usually the final chord of the song. Use the harmonized scale to find all the possible chords. A "harmonized scale" is just the scale of the key with chords played instead of the notes. For C major, the harmonized scale is C Dm Em F G Am Bdim 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Figure out the roots of the chords played in the ...


3

While experimenting with those last two bars a bit, I came up with the Cmaj7(#5) chord, which in my opinion sounds quite good. The G# can resolve to the C chord's G, and the B can resolve to the C chord's C. An alternative interpetation is that your chord is actually a (enharmonically equivalent) Ab9(#5) chord (omitted 7th). There is a "rule" that ...


4

It's certainly possible for these notes to resolve to the I. Only, I'd argue what you have there is not so much Imaj7(♯5) as Imaj7(♭6)... and immediately it makes sense. For that chord is basically just V♭9 plus a I pedal bass note. If you ignore the pedal and add an F, since you omit the G note it's simply the standard diminished seventh ...


5

In a given key, there are basically 3 main major and three main minor chords found in the underlying harmonies. Majors are I, IV and V. Minors are ii, iii and vi.This will translate in C to be C,Dm,Em,F,G and Am.Those chords will cover many, many songs and tunes from many genres, in Western music. First to establish is the tonic - the key chord of a piece. ...


8

Cmaj7#5 to C doesn't sound far fetched at all. In the end, if something sounds good - use it! But, if something sounds good, there will usually be an explanation for why it works... In this case, Cmaj7#5 is a chord containing chromatic tension, that "wants" to resolve to something simpler. In particular, the two chromatic alterations to the chord (B, the ...


4

When in doubt, refer to the first rule of composition: If it sounds cool, it’s right. However, there’s also a sound theoretical basis for what you’re doing here. The common V–IV–I–I blues turnaround has the same problem as your song when leading back into another I chord, and the solution is similar. In blues, you usually substitute in a V chord at the end ...


-3

In music there is rules , one of them says that you can break rules so if G# to C sounds ok then use it , G# to C sounds a bit wired for an ending , But it can resolve to C because it has chromatic voices to the C chord. Sorry this is a short answer I'm away


-1

It all depends what the underlying key is. By itself the sequence means nothing, or anything. In C major at the end of a piece you would call it a tierce de Picardie.


10

This chord progression is extremely common in a lot of rock, pop and R&B music and is usually called bVI–bVII–I (where the b's are flat signs). In other words, the A major triad is generally taken as defining A major as the overriding key, but the preceding chords are taken to be major triads built on the lowered sixth and seventh scale degrees. Bob ...


4

Interesting harmonies can often be produced by moving a single chord shape/type around (transposing it), rather than by strictly using chords within a particular mode, scale or key. One example that has always fascinated me, for instance, is transposing major chords by the intervals in a minor pentatonic scale, something that is often done in pop/rock music. ...


3

In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


-2

There is a general distinction between "closed" and "open" voicings of chords -- what you gave as an example looks like a closed voicing (where the notes of the chord are as close as they can be). When creating an open chord voicing using many notes spread over a number of octaves, it is often good to follow the spacing of the overtone series: use octaves ...


5

As the other answers have said, a secondary dominant is a 7th chord that resolves to a chord other than the tonic. The classic example is a D7 chord in the key of C: the D7 resolves to G, which itself resolves to C. Dominants create tension To understand the theory and practice behind secondary dominants, you have to understand that all dominant chords ...


3

Theory Secondary Dominants are chords that are the Dominant (V) chord of a certain key other than the Tonic (I) key. For example, let the current key be C Major. An F Major chord is the Subdominant (IV) of the current key (C Major). How about a C Dominant 7th chord? That is not in the current key, but you know it's the Dominant 7th (V7) of F Major, and F ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


2

A secondary dominant chord is when you turn a minor or major 7th chord into a dominant chord, in order to make another chord the tonic chord. I can't tell you exactly what's the theory behind this, but I can tell you a bit about how they're used, not so much for composition but for arrangements: Take for example a typical chord progression I-VI-II-V. If we ...


3

possible voicings of a 3 note chord include those 3 halfsteps in ANY and ALL of the 7.3 octaves. your example is ok for when the 1,3,5 are only used once. But maybe you want 3 separate bass notes in 3 of the lower octaves, plus a 3rd in octave 4, and 2 5ths in octaves 5 and 6. You could have that 3 note chord playing on 21-ish possible notes or any ...


4

There's the standard root-3rd-5th making a root position, then 1st inversion with 3rd-5th-root up an octave, and 2nd inversion, with 5th at the bottom-root (up an octave from original)-3rd(up as well).Go up another step and it's back to root. As there are so many combinations of the three notes available on several instruments, I don't believe there is a ...


1

As your wrist starts to strengthen through practicing bar chords, your positioning will become more supple and flexible to create a good contact between your finger and the fretboard. This will come from practice, but can also be enhanced by some practice techniques to vary the method slightly. One thing I found useful was "building" shapes from the top 4 ...


1

Adding to slim's answer, the only time you'd need to be accurate with the barre finger on the 3rd string is when you play minor, minor 7th chords, using an 'E' shape, and dominant 7th ,minor 7th chords using an 'A' shape.As a beginner, as you get better on the barre chords that are not any of those, you will improve enough to cope. You may also consider ...


3

You will overcome this by practising, but you don't need to worry about it just yet. It's not that common to need to play all six strings barred. Concentrate at first on the two most common barred shapes - the "A shape" (for example, a barred Bb) and the "E shape" (for example, a barred F). With both of these shapes you barre across six strings, and fret 3 ...


1

To me it sounds like quartal harmony and is non-functional in a traditional tonal way, it also has no strong tonal implications. Probably I would name it F7sus4/G although the chord symbol system is not ideal for such harmony. Bearing in mind that sometimes jazz composers write out the scales/modes rather than chords you could just say Eb pentatonic scale/G ...


2

While melodies usually emphasize chord tones of the harmony, the relationship varies greatly between styles and even from one song to another. For example, some blues solos strictly follow the chord tones of the underlying 12-bar progression, but others stick closer to the tonic center while the harmony changes around it. You could even play a legitimate ...


0

I think a simple theoretical concept that might help bridge the gap here is the notion that a chunk of the melody ITSELF can often be reduced to the arpeggiation of one of the basic chords of the key. If you can spot an arpeggiation of this type, you can harmonize a bunch of melodic notes at once, rather than running the "what chords fit under this note" ...


10

It's an Eb6/9 chord with a G in the bass. A major 6/9 chord is a chord that has the basis of a major triad and has a major 6th and a major 9th(major 2nd) in it without a 7th. The spelling is Eb G Bb C F. The full chord symbol would be Eb6/9/G. Also as a side note, it would be difficult for this chord to function as a dominant as the leading tone of C ...


2

Generally speaking, and particularly for students with no great knowledge or experience, start with the home key chord. This sets the scene. And finish with it as well. This gives the piece more shape. 'I started from home, and now I'm back'. The majority of pieces do this, because it works. You're right in that if you start somewhere else, it sounds modal. ...


-1

For a basic chord, the root and the 3rd (1st and 2nd note in the chord, e.g. C and E in a C chord) define the chord. This is why guitar "power chords" use only those 2 notes. When playing with others since the bass section will usually play the root so a lead instrument (e.g lead guitar should hit the 3rd)


2

Going to oppose Deannakov's thoughts, and say that to sound high, or higher, a chord will have to have higher notes in it. The defining highest note will be the decider. Having said that, it's somewhat like do you put the sugar in tea before or after the water. The difference may be debated for ever, and it's rather subjective. At the stage you're at with ...


4

I would definitely say that the most important notes in the chord in this regard are the first and last note, but the bass note more likely will have the most power within the context of a song. I would guess if the bass note is moving up (like, lets say bass is playing A, B, C, D, the movement of the progression would have a higher sound... as in, it would ...


5

As you said, the first four chords can be understood as chords from E mixolydian. Note that from then on the chords follow a downward movement in minor thirds (at least enharmonically): E => C# => A#/Bb => G and from there to B, the V of E. The downward movement in minor thirds is equivalent to going from a minor scale to its relative major scale (and that's ...


2

Power chords and shell chords both serve a similar function. A power chord strips a triad down to the root and fifth; a shell chord uses the root, seventh, and sometimes the third. Power chords and shell chords both sacrifice some of the chords’ character but still drive the chord progression. They simplify the harmony, which has a couple of major benefits: ...


1

A "power chord" under this name is used for distortion play, period. If you have frequencies f and its harmonics, and 3/2f and its harmonics, the intermodulation frequencies are all multiples of f/2. So that basically means that the harmonics "hint" at a fundamental frequency of f/2 which is in line with the bass note of the power chord. Organs do have ...


2

I learned a few of the scales first and learned some chord progressions that a teacher told me fit over them, and then learned chord theory, and that worked out. For chord theory you should learn first major and minor scales, because those are the most straight forward. The chord has to have only the notes of the scale in it. A chord is formed by the root, ...


1

Whilst leaning all the scales will be of great help in your playing, and probably understanding, the main one for this purpose is the major scale. Chords basically are made up of 1-3-5 of a scale. These are triads- 3 notes. Using the major scale, these will be major chords. To get minors, you could just make the maj. 3rd into a min. 3rd, rather than use the ...


2

In the middle ages and before that, they used a system of tuning called Pythagorean tuning (as opposed to 12 tone equal temperament which we use today). This basically meant that you tuned with a stack of fifths until you got 12 notes (and moved the octaves around), as opposed to equally spacing them out. This meant that there were really nice fifths, but ...


3

I would venture that ONE of the functions of a power chord is to provide an open melodic soloing space. I recall an interview with Eric Johnson in which he referred to fifth/power chords as "open chords" -- meaning that the soloing space over the chord was unrestricted. That was a different perspective than I had ever used for that terminology(*). I concede ...


11

Like you and others said, the main reason of using power chords is to avoid the intermodulation distortion: Thirds sound muddy with distortion. I think that they generally have two functions in rock music. One function is to use it as a substitute for a triad. Here, the third is generally implied. But it may be played by a solo guitar or sung by the ...


3

You don't need any programs for this. Just use an extensive chart like the one on chordie.com: link.


2

I think they do evoke an emotion, which is quite hard to describe .. I wish I could remember the song but there's a solo in said tune where a fiddle player plays a power chord for a bar or two. It's an american folk/country song- the power chord shines right through everything, even though it's not that loud. The rest of the fiddle solo involves a lot of ...


6

Bagpipes come close, even though their drones are at a pitch and its octave. The harmonics come into play here (pun intended), because every instrument produces not only the fundamental note that we think we hear, but some/lots of others too.Each instrument will have particular overtones, partials or harmonics that it will produce in different proportions. ...


2

I think if I were trying to make this distinction, I'd call the first referent (the em in C) "the third degree of the scale" and the second referent (minor third of that em chord) the "third above the root": Ie. "In C major, the chord of em is built on the third scale degree, and the note G is the third above its root." rwf


12

These are frequency ratios. The first digit is the common denominator (10). In a deminished seventh the following ratios are present: 12/10 = 6/5 = minor third 14/10 = 7/5 ~ sqrt(2) ~ diminished fifth 17/10 : this is trickier In a diminished seventh chord the fourth note is a diminished seventh, which is enharmonic to the major sixth (whose frequency is ...


3

I think 'chordal' is the term you're searching for. As in that G would be a 'chordal minor third'. Chordal coming from 'of the chord'.As opposed to its place in the parent scale of 'dominant'note.


4

In my experience, to avoid this confusion, people generally treat the chord-scale as a giant chord, naming each of its notes as if it were part of the chord. root, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and so on. In other words, the "2" would be referred to as a 9 regardless of if it's inside the voicing or above it. This would give rise to the feeling that "scale ...



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