Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

It's a very distinct and verbose way to name 7th chords that is derived from classic theory. I'm not sure if it has a name or even needs a name as there's always more then one way to name chords for example some people use Co7 to represent a fully diminished chord and some people use Cm6b5 to denote the same chord and call it that. I'll refer to it as 7th ...


1

I don't know if the major-minor thing has a name, but the idea is to dissociate the actual intervals from the tonal function. Calling a chord a "major minor seventh" is simply describing the chord without any context, and calling a chord a "dominant" chord is describing a relationship with the tonic. In the kind of Classical music that is typically used to ...


2

As with many questions asked here, the answer is practice; lots of practice. The simplest way to practice is to play songs -- sing or whistle if you like; you don't need to sing well if you're practising in private. By playing actual songs, you learn functional sets of chords that work together, and the way your left hand can shift from one of these to ...


2

A little context would help: a few more measures on either side, the name of the composer/era, etc. However, as a general rule, when the melody is in the bass like this the harmonic analysis focuses on the upper notes, and bass-melodic non-chord tones are identified in relation to them. For example, beat 2 of the first measure and beat 1 of the second look ...


0

If you play Classical Guitar: Try raising the footstand a click so your wrist can remain straight. Make sure your arm isn't on anything (like the arm of a chair). Barre Chords are essential. You can ignore the rest of this post. If You Play on a Steel String Acoustic or Electric: Assuming you play Rock, Blues, Metal or even Jazz (I am open to be ...


2

Tim was partway there. It's not uncommon in movements that are in the minor to end in the major, not just a tierce de Picardie, but a coda in the major, or even a good part of the recapitulation: it's a way of resolving the tension inherent in the minor mode in common practice tonality. A finale in the tonic major is taking that sense of resolution up a ...


-1

The 'tierce de Picardy' is maybe your answer. It is known as the Picardy third, and is used to finish a minor piece , on the parallel major. Obviously, if the piece is 'xyz in D minor', the key signature is going to be one flat throughout it, unless there's a key change or modulation, but it'll probably gravitate back to D minor again. The 'different major ...


0

Tim's answer is a great explanation, looked at from the perspective of the melody. Depending on how you learn and understand music it will be easier for some people to see it from the perspective of the chords. This will expand on the correct observations of Michael and Bananach. I use uppercase roman numerals, remember minus (-) means minor. We have 5 ...


1

In this case, the diminished chord is kind of special, in that it works as a passing chord to harmonize all non-chord tones. What I mean by this, and what I think is sort of implied by your question, is that in taking a scale (C major for example), if you harmonize all the notes in this scale, with locked-hands, block-chords style, for the notes C, E, G and ...


2

I feel your frustration! But it is a normal part of learning to play guitar. One reason so many aspiring new guitarist, give up before they ever get to a point where they feel a sense of reward and accomplishment, is that learning guitar involves overcoming several difficult challenges thrown at you all at once in the very beginning. First you have ...


0

Those are often just notes add to chords to give a musical piece depth. Jazz players sometimes talk about coloring chords in with added sevenths and ninths. Am7 This is just a chord with a seventh added. Regular solution of seventh should apply with these chords as well. Am6 Chords with sixths are usually passing chords where the sixth acts as middle man ...


2

It's always good to have the rhythmic feel of a piece/style in your bones as (or even before) you try to learn it. If you're really not familiar with the style, play the music around the house, and dance to it - or at least practice clapping on the 2 and the 4! Think of the music swinging to and fro, with the 1 on the "left", 2 on the "right", 3 on the left, ...


4

*Try to think hard about where your fingers have to move from/to. With C - Am, for example, two fingers (4th and 2nd strings) don't need to move off their frets. *Try to move a pair of fingers together, as in Em - Am,keeping them touching each other as they move across between strings. When you learn E, then A, you leave your index finger on the 3rd string ...


1

Partly, it just takes time to learn the shapes, such that you think "E minor" and your fingers "just go" to that shape. It might take a long time, but you'll get there with practice. Just keep doing it while you're watching TV etc. A couple of months isn't that long to have been learning. Also, it's good to make sure you are getting your wrist and elbow ...


2

I have started learning guitar basics,since last couple of months. I am facing huge difficulty in shifting chords. Welcome to the guitar. Any tips will be really helpful. Welcome to the guitar. That's really all there is to it. Chord shapes take mental effort and motor coordination for you right now and there is nothing that will help other than ...


1

Whenever you see scales notated in both standard music notation and tab, and the tab uses open strings, its almost always because it was entered on keyboard and then the notation software auto-generates the tab. What you want is diagrams that show the pattern from the lowest note of the scale that is available in the hand position, to the highest note that ...


0

A scale starts on a note which may or may not be the first note you play so to imply that playing in Dm is so complicated isn't fair,start first with your corresponding Maj key which is three half steps above your minor key so in this case it would be F Maj as 1 when you do it you start on Dm forget that it's minor, just your pattern will be whole half whole ...


5

This will be a G7b9 chord. Where the 9th is flattened from A to Ab. So, the whole chord has pitches G B D F Ab Although the "-" sign is sometimes used to denote a minor chord (a chord with a minor 3rd), it can also be used to denote a minor, flattened or diminished interval in a chord. For example -5 for b5, or in this case -9 for b9.


3

The three notes C, E and G constitute a C major chord. Since a guitar has normally 6 strings, it makes sense to play, sometimes, all of the strings at the same time - strum. Each string can produce one of those notes, so a 6-string chord is made. If you play bottom st. 0, 5th 3, 4th 2, 3rd 0, 2nd 1 and top 0, you have one voicing of Cmaj. Probably the most ...


-2

When someone writes C-E-G they are referring to these notes as pitch-classes, i.e. irrespective of any particular octave position. To write "C-E-G-C-E" is superfluous because the last two notes, C and E, refer to a pitch-class space already occupied by the first two notes. On the other hand were someone to write C4-E4-G4-C5-E5, it would be appropriate and ...


2

It is the same chord. The 3 same notes are doubled. It is just another voicing of the C major chord.


1

So among the alterations that diminished chords go under, let's assume that your "softening" means to lower the seventh of the chord diatonically to create a dominant seventh chord. This fits all three of your example cases. In Am: diminished chord | diminished spelling | softened chord | softened spelling iim7b5 | B, D, F, A | bVII7 ...


0

To complement all the answers here, some chord progressions adhere to the primary scale, some don't. There is another way to frame perception of your concern, which is to see the melody as the primary song component, and then fill out chords around that, as additionally suits the chord progression. Moreover, this is more inclined to work if you see your own ...


0

They can be avoided by using the retunings suggested in this question What guitar tunings allow chords without fretting between live strings? Otherwise your option is to avoid notes and strings in the first place, which would substantially compromise your versatility and/or force you to adopt (possibly overly) colorful alternative voicings.


0

A basic comprehensive reading on classical theory would greatly benefit your improv and understanding of how melody relates to harmony. Specifically regarding your question, this link will greatly help you: Wikipedia nonharmonic tones. Check out Suspension. The benefits are immense from a basic fundamental knowledge of classical theory. I can't stress ...


0

It sounds like what you want to do is play some of the melody notes (what the singer is singing) by picking them out of the chord you are playing - or while staying close to the chord so you can play the melody over the chord and keep the rhythm going at the same time. I play the notes of what the singer sings while strumming part of the current ...


1

It somehow seems to me you're asking if you can play the same scale over all chords from a given song, which would be : mostly. Usually a song or a song part will be in a given key (so a single scale should fit), but it will slightly change one chord to add color. Off the top of my mind I'd say the change from C to C minor in Radiohead's Creep or the ...


1

Lower the action as much as you can without fret buzz Try a lighter gauge set of strings Re-set your bridge intonation for the new gauge strings so its not out of tune when you play barre chords Don't try press all the strings down with the barre finger just the outsides Some people curl the finger ever so slightly, look for the least pressure position that ...


2

I like to avoid them. Here are some chord boxes for alternatives to normal barre chords. First off, on electric guitar and sometimes on acoustic you can change your hand position and put your thumb over the top, which you can also use to fret, along with a mini-barre on the first two strings: I don't find the thumb AND mini-barre comfortable but I pretty ...


1

Avoiding them might prove to be an interesting exercise. You could base what you play on a barre shape and pick out notes from it, typically one note per set of two strings,getting three voices which will most often spell the whole chord and sometimes imply it. For instance, instead of a barre G chord, you could play the root on the low E, the third on the G ...


7

I'm not sure whether this is the same as topo morto's answer - but it starts off similarly. Best bet: Cheat! You don't have to play all 6 strings. In fact rarely is there an advantage. Eg if you play an E-shaped barre chord, you could just fret the thickest 4 strings. That means you get a nice full sound and in fact it's no longer a barre chord - you can ...


3

It is possible to avoid barres by playing only as many strings as you can fret with individual fingers. For example, for E- and A- shape barres, you can often just play the root of the note with the barre finger, and not include the top notes. Edit : other answers have made good suggestions about checking your guitar setup; I would suggest that a ...


3

A capo will, in some instances, avoid using barre chords. For example, instead of playing the sequence C F G, where F needs to be barred, a capo on the 3rd fret would need the chords A D and E (shapes) to be used to remain in the same key. The voicing would be slightly different, but to a singer it would be fine.


5

You simply need to play the chord shapes as indicated in the tab. They will sound higher with the capo. So, e.g., with the capo on the 2nd fret the C shape you play will sound like a D chord, and this is exactly the purpose of the capo. The Em chord will sound like F#m, which would normally (i.e. without capo) be played as a barre chord. Note that often it's ...


1

In "locked hands" style, you can often take a pragmatic voice-leading approach to passing chords. Move what has to move, let what can stay put do so. No need to worry too much about analyzing the result.


0

It sounds to me like you are referring to the passing 6/4 chord progression of I(6)-vii(6)-I. Which is very common passing chord. (especially in four part harmony exercises.)


0

OK. In fact this questions is not one but many, depending on the (theory knlowledge) level of the person asking. To understand how to use a passing chord, one must first understand what is NOT a passing chord. In jazz, a passing chord is something different from the iim7-V7-IM7 (in major), or the minor equivalent of iim7b5 -V7alt-ImM7 (Im6) AND THAT IS ...


0

The big thing here is to understand that you can use any notes you want as long as you do it in a way that will strengthen or weaken your tonality of any given key. There are no set "rules", but understand that by introducing non-diatonic notes, it will have an effect on the tonality of your piece/phrase/bar or on how you are modulating to a new key. EDIT: ...


0

Understanding these more complex kinds of musical phenomena depends ultimately on one's own interpretation. The analysis in the first link you've provided calls Bb the tonic chord during the entirety of the chromatic neighbor motion in question. My view of this passage, however, is that Eb is in fact functioning as a local tonic, with Bb as its dominant. ...


3

It's a little sneakier than that. Here's the score; look for yourself. The passage in question starts at m. 61. Debussy quotes the melody at pitch of the opening measure-and-a-half of the Prelude to Tristan, but he never quite lands on the Tristan chord - there's always something a little off. He repeats it several times, landing a couple of times each on A♭ ...


1

I believe this is exactly what BBNG makes use of in their song CS60 on the first chord when the melody comes in. It sounds to me like an Ab major7 (b9) than then resolves down to the root, G minor and continues to Eb and then basically D minor (the diatonic VI and v respectively). The melody notes go from b9 to major 7 and it works really well in giving it ...


1

The first one's OK, you've redistributed the original notes. But in the second one you've invented a new harmony, and that ISN'T OK! I suggest you simply leave out the low E in the RH. Or even play the B octave a bit early, catch it with the pedal and take the E with your LH.


1

I want to point out a few things: First of all, as others have mentioned, the tritone is symmetric. What this means is that if you take a tritone, and transpose it up or down by a tritone (6 half steps) the result is the same as the interval that you started with (assuming enharmonic equivalence). As a result of the above, moving a tritone up or down by 1 ...


2

It's because of beauty of symmetry (and asymmetry) of musical scale. (WARNING: some math ahead) Take a C major scale, and write it down the intervals between each note in number. So a halftone is 1, whole tone is 2 because it's two times the halftone. C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 ...


4

As mentioned by Raskolnikov it is indeed just the circle of fifths and nothing else. If you have no sharps and no flats, and you add one sharp, you can say you go from C major to G major. You can also say you go from A minor to E minor. Equivalently, you go from D dorian to A dorian, or from D dorian to D mixolydian, or from A aeolian to A dorian, etc.etc. ...


5

This selection of five pitches could be a constituent part of a number of scales, although it is not a part of any diatonic scale. As a set of notes itself, it could be referred to by its PC Set name (Forte Number), which in this case is 5-19. This has a prime form of [01367]. (You can find this using a PC Set Calculator, such as this one.) According to this ...


0

Best advice I can give you since you expressed that part of your problem already is you have short fingers and can't finger or barre chords sometimes, tells me you have a problem lots of people do. All guitars are Not built the same. Meaning, the profile of the guitar necks are all different. Some have lots of shoulder on the sides of the neck. Some necks ...


1

I second the classical guitar position. Depending on which strings have to sound, I try these approaches in this order... (not all are possible depending on the size and shape of your hands and fingers - my index is not very flat so however much pressure is applied strings under the finger grooves won't sound) Fret the barre close to the fret - Apply ...


1

I deal with the same issue, a tip I was given is to make sure to keep the wrist low and the index finger as straight as possible, also be sure you are rolling your index finger slightly so you are playing more on the fingers edge/side rather than the fleshy middle part. Also ensure you are as close to the fret as you can get.



Top 50 recent answers are included