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1

To add onto the previous answers: I think it's kindof like learning to read (a language, I mean). You start by learning phonetics and picking out the sounds in a word. Similarly, as the other two people mentioned, you can often pick out individual notes (especially bass notes), that give clues as to the chord. However, as you read more, you don't do it ...


0

Further to Shevliaskovic's post : When a chord changes, often there are one or two notes whcih may change only by a tone or semitone. Sometimes this gives you a huge clue as to what's going on. For example I was recently learning tiny Dancer (Elton John) and there was an odd chord at the words "dancing in the sand". I couldn't get it just by listening to ...


1

I would recommend focusing on the bass of the chord. When you see how the bass moves, it will help you understand what kind of interval is between the chords. Listen to the bass and then to the quality of the chord. This might need some training on its own before you start recognizing chords on the songs. If you have a piano player friend or a teacher, he ...


1

Using your thumb isn't "bad technique" per se. It's either appropriate or it isn't, given the context in which you do it. For example, if this chord is sandwiched between two others which require the first finger barre, maybe it would be better to leave the finger down through those chords. Bad technique is what I did when I started playing years ago, saw ...


2

There is an open-source project called CLAM. It has an application that automatically analyzes chords: http://clam-project.org/wiki/Chordata_tutorial There are also more advanced applications that are part of the CLAM suite that can do more complex analysis. Here is a demo of chordata:


1

One handwaving characteristic of the "root note" is that its frequency is the greatest common divisor of the chord notes. It takes a lot of handwaving since for one thing, with an equal-tempered tuning there is at best an approximate gcd (you have to use some scale with just intontation, and of course the choice of scale influences the result), for another, ...


0

Some of the tricks used in country music where the guitar was for show more than anything else, the would wrap their thumb around the three base strings and the index fingers around the 123 in same fret to form a chord. Then moving it up and down the neck the singer could play along with the band. Some of those country singers playing was worse than their ...


1

Who has the power to decide? Any technique that works for an individual cannot be a bad one. Yes, purists may disagree, but it's not them playing, it's you! As stated already, an extra digit is always an asset, particularly on extended guitar chords. I'm only jealous, having small hands...


0

Not at all, it's a great technique! There are chords that you can only play by using your thumb, e.g. the following voicing of A13(b9) (from low E to high e): 5 X 5 6 7 6 where you play the E string with your thumb. If you used your first finger to play a barre chord it would be very difficult to mute the A string.


1

I wouldn't say this is a bad technique. There are many guitarists that use this one, for the very same reason you mentioned. You have one extra finger, thus you can play one more note. Also, when I play a chord like this, it is more relaxing for my hand.


1

Look around for a guitar that fits your fingers better. Neck width and length varies among manufacturers and even among models for a single manufacturer. If you have the ability to visit multiple stores trying stuff out, you should be able to find one that works for you. Or, if you have plenty of cash, find a builder and have one made to your own specs! ...


5

The short answer is - DO NOT give up on playing guitar just because your fingers aren't optimally configured. You can adapt and learn to play quite well - if you really want to! Unfortunately not all of us who aspire to learn to play guitar are blessed with long slender fingers. But if you have a strong desire to play, you can overcome whatever ...


3

Could be a few things to look at, with the best/most likely at the top Finger and hand positions, experiment with different techniques until you find a perfect hand position/shape for EVERY chord you are getting bum notes with that reduces the chances of a bad sound, trying alternate places and or missing out notes to get a chord that sounds best Have ...


6

Most players probably don't play full chords above 12th fret; however, you could try using fewer fingers, as in for an E shaped chord, using one finger on 5th and 4th strings, similarly on A shaped chords, play with 2 or 3 fingers - a barre over all 6, and a mini barre over 4,3 and 2. Just playing 3 or 4 notes out of particular chords works well, too, as ...


2

Here's what I was taught by my teacher with regards to solo piano when I was first starting off with him. It is a method to play solo piano with the chord spread out between both hands and the melody as the top note of the chord. It's definitely not the only approach to this, but it is a systematic approach that really helped me. Let's say you're playing ...


-1

This was the initial post: Just for clarification about the term modulation: As a musical term it means the process of moving to another key (as TONICA) (root) by means of a chord-progression that clearly establishes the functional part (TONICA) of the new key. Sometimes it is enough to play a DOMINANT seventh chord to establish the new TONICA of a ...


1

One answer about b6 chords is that they are ALMOST ALWAYS mis-identified as such. In almost every real book/fake book/chart, if you see a b6 chord it has an enharmonic equivalent spelling that makes far more sense in the harmony analysis than the b6 chord spelling does.


0

I would rather say that there is no theory behind it but rather a kind of style and a tendency to connect chords in the shortest way possible. That meaning - every note of a chord has to go to the closest note of the following chord with the least possible resistance -> shortest movement and easy to sing if you see each chord progression as different ...


3

If you see it from a pure classical standpoint, a 6th can never be a part of a chord-signature. Every chord is built by adding another 3rd to its predecessor note - starting from the root note. So you only get 1 3 5 7 9 11 13... Even a chord like e.g. C6 is interpreted as a minor 7th chord with the 3rd of the chord as root -> A C E G (1 3 5 7) -> C E G A (3 ...


2

Well there is a chord that fits that description if you look at it that way, but you would never call it that. The actual chord is an augmented major 7th chord which built on C would be a C+M7. With a root of C it is spelled C, E, G#, B which can be respelled E, G#, B, C. The reason why you'll never see it called an E b6 is one it look way too much like ...


1

If you're going to call it C6, it's because it's in a sequence where C is more predominant than A, for instance, in a sequence C, C6, Cma7, C6. If it was preceded by the dom.5 of A,(E), it would then take the mantle of Am7. If it was, say, C6, 1st inversion, thus, in isolation, could be either, then the chords either side would dictate technically what it's ...


3

Context is always important when naming chords as many chords can be named multiple ways. When given a choice between a chord like Am7/C or C6 the default is to call it a C6 for a good reason because have the bass note be perceived as the root is very typical rather than assume the chord is in first inversion. In almost every case those two chords serve ...


2

You've lots of low notes at your disposal! Just use them with l.h. and put the top parts of the chords in with r.h. Assuming you're accompanying a soloist of some sorts. If not, then you'll have to maybe arpeggiate 1,5 etc. with l.h. and some sparse chords along the melody with r.h.


0

It depends on the situation being played in. When there's a bass player, he'll be putting roots and fives (not exclusively, but that's his job in a lot of situations), so those notes missing from your playing won't be, well, missed. So, 3s, 7s and 9s are your job. further up the sonic spectrum, as guitar is, they'll sound fine, and complement the bass. In ...


3

As others have stated there is a temporary modulation. But the particular change you are referring to (IV to iv) actually comes from the Harmonic Major Scale. The scale was named by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. For instance a C harmonic major scale consists of the notes C D E F G Ab B (C). Contrary to the usual (ionian) major scale: C D E F G A B. Some good ...


4

The chord basic progression I - VI - IV - II - V - I has been around almost as long as tonal music. Pop song writers have used it hundreds of times, and so did Mozart. In the key of F, that is F - Dm - Bb - Gm - C - F. Add a few 7ths if you want, of course. But you can precede almost any chord with its "secondary dominant". The dominant of Dm is A, so F - ...


3

This progression immediately reminds me of Creep by Radiohead, though it is in C major, not F major. While there is no natural key containing F major and A major, these two chords together are very common in most genres, but especially in rock, which loves minor to major substitutions. D minor is the relative minor of F major, and while the key of D minor ...


5

A common place for this to occur is IV to iv, often then returning to I, which makes (in your F key) the Db a semitone from C, and Bb a semitone from A, both found in the F chord. The F, of course, remains static. It's the same sort of semitone pull that makes V7 work so well as a dominant, to I. 'Major to minor' is one way to describe it. Ironically, in ...


2

There a lot one can do when writing creating a progression to introduce chords that would not necessarily be found in within the same key. In fact, There isn't a key that naturally contains both an F major chord and an A major chord, but I'll focused on the chords you're interested in which is the Bb major and the Bb minor. For simplicity let's say these ...


3

It's just a temporary modulation. In jazz and older pop music, this shows up frequently in a progression called "downstep modulation", where you have sequential iim-V7-Is a whole step lower, so for example: Am7-D7-GMaj7 Gmin7-C7-FMaj7, Fm7 ...


4

Putting on my mathematician hat, the notion of distance is dependent upon many factors. The real question is what is it that you are looking for when you say distance? Do you mean that you are looking for harmonic similarity? Do you mean some sort of measure of auditory similarity? Do you mean how they relate on the circle of 5ths? The construct of a ...


1

There is a best way to do this, and it's the accepted practise in jazz, I've taught this lots and watched it work. You need to drill all keys changing roots and chords in every possible permutation, starting with the most common movements. You put on a metronome, and you play em. Start as slow as you need to in order to get through all keys with no hiccups. ...


1

The question is "what's the best way..." The answer requires a tiny bit of setup: In the past, musicians were well-versed in reading sheet music and had a decent understanding of at least simple functional harmony. Today, that "baseline" level of knowledge has been eroded by the use of tablature and other "rote" notations, which by simplifying the ...


0

Not exactly sure what you're looking for, but here's an idea. Establish a chord sequence, of maybe 8, 12 bars. Let's use C, G, Dm7, G7 as the first line. They could well be played using root chords for each, but I think you need to move more subtly. Try, for example, CEG (root) for the first. That establishes 'home' in an unequivocal way. Moving to G, find ...


14

The simplest metric, and probably the most frequently used (even if only implicitly), is to count the number of steps between the chords' roots along a one-dimensional line of fifths (or the circle of fifths, if you permit enharmonics and modular arithmetic). I say this is the most frequently used because chord progressions where the root ascends or descends ...


5

This is a big part of voice leading specifically where you look for common tones between chords in the harmony and how you can take advantage of them when transitioning between them. It's not really a formula as much as it is just assessing how related the two chords are. The basic idea is to just look what notes if any are common and if the notes move by ...


0

Ignoring all discussion and answering only the title question: a b5 means you are replacing the 5 and keeping all other notes (including the 4 intact.) A #11 means you are replacing the 4th and keeping all other notes (including the 5) intact. So the answer is: whichever is correct when used in the context of the surrounding chords and melody of the song. ...


0

Whether or not notes are dropped on the harmony instrument (piano or guitar) partly depends on the voicing. It's perfectly acceptable to play both 3rd and 11 or #11, but you may choose to do this with a spread apart voicing rather than close together. The jazz pianist usually includes the third and seventh, as you know (or the 4th if sus), with everything ...


0

A fully diminished chord is a V7b9 voicing. So wherever is appropriate to use a V7b9 the diminished chord is already a part of it. In general, a diminished chord has a dominant function because it contains the tritone. A fully diminished chord contains two pairs of tritones, which means it can be used to resolve to four different target chords. For ...


3

I agree with @MattPutnam's answer as far as chord inversions and close/open voicings are concerned, but I'd like to add an explanation of what drop voicings are. First of all, there are no "drop 2 chords", there are only drop 2 voicings of chords. The concept of drop voicings is often applied to four part chords. A drop voicing is obtained by dropping one ...


4

Chord inversion simply refers to which note is in the bass (i.e., the lowest note). We start in root position with the root in the bass: for a C major chord, C is the lowest note. If we imagine a simple C-E-G triad, then we can "invert" the chord by moving the C up an octave, getting E-G-C, with E (the third) in the bass. This is first inversion. We do ...


1

A friend o' mine did the double barre in a song many years ago and I was like, "Whoa, what's that?" He showed me and I went home and practiced it until my fingers ached, then practiced more. It's great to have that major chord at such a quick flick from the majors above it G to C, A to D, etc.. Nice for speed songs like punk rock too. Attack it and ...


0

The book answer is incorrect. By convention, a B7(b9 #11 b13) has an unaltered fifth and also an augmented 4th (11th). The technically correct answer for the written chord is B7(b5 b9 b13), because the written chord does not have both the #11 and b5. The general rule is that notated available altered tensions do not replace or alter chord tones.


1

Your answer is fine. The books answer is fine. Jazz. Altered dominants. You could also call b13 a #5. avoiding the altered fifth nomenclature may indicate the 5th is included E.g. #11 might indicate inclusion of the fifth. While b5 mans no unaltered fifth. Same goes for b13 vs #5 b9 and #9 are also used on some altered dominants - These indicate not ...



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