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3

Yes it is a minor chord. The type of scale does not matter nor does the type of chord you can build off the tonic. Only the notes used to make the chord matter. A major chord will always consist of a root, major 3rd, and perfect 5th and a minor chord will always consist of a root, minor 3rd, and perfect 5th.


-1

There's no "correct" way to exactly name this chord using the standard nomenclature.


0

Given the notes C G A Bb, I would think of it as a Gmadd2 (no5)/C or taking the notes in the order which would come from C13 removing the third, ninth, and eleventh [C G Bb A] I would think of it as a Gm add9 (no 5)/C.


0

The reason the first section sounds dissonant is because the perfect fifth is very low, and so this may sound dissonant even though it is not. You can hear a similar (or possibly increased) effect if you have a major third instead of your perfect fifth at a similar pitch, because the notes will be closer together at the low pitch. In the second section, it ...


1

Harmony in general is a pretty broad topic and there isn't just one option for how to do harmony. In general, harmony is the simultaneous or "vertical" relation between what is being played. There is the typical Western idea of functional harmony where the Tonic-Dominant relationship (I-V) drives the progressions we encounter, but there is a lot more out ...


0

Let's take a step back and just get a grasp of what is being shown here. The notes on the staff represent the melody and the Roman numerals represent the harmony. The Roman Numeral in the harmony is valid until another Roman Numeral replaces it so yes the harmony is an I which is an F major chord throughout the first measure. The melody and the harmony are ...


1

When you write the roman numeral denomination of the chords, you are implying that the notes that make up each chord are present, although not explicitly written in the score. So "I" in your example means that the notes F-A-C would be in some fashion played in an improvised manner by a performer or arranged or orchestrated by the composer for the orchestra ...


0

So, you have three vectors of amplitude versus time of the three notes, say A = [0 1 0 1 0 1] B = [0 0 1 1 0 0] C = [0 0 0 1 1 1] which sound good by themselves. In order to add them to make a chord, simply take the weighted sum of the three, element by element: D = 1/3 * (A + B + C) = [0 1/3 1/3 1 1/3 1/3]. In other words, a chord or complex tone is ...


-1

writing a synthesizer, eh? that's a pretty tall order. hope it's not your first programming project :) Each note is mapped to a sample, right? When the note starts, you start sending out samples for the note, looping back to the repeat point at the beginning. In order to hear 2 notes at once, you add the samples going out at the same time together (...


0

Which software are you using? I have played around with Pure Data and Processing. These have oscillator objects in their respective libraries which will emit sine waves through the specified audio output. In order to generate chords in either of these interfaces, two or more oscillator objects need to be created, and the ratios of the frequencies need ...


0

You mentioned that you are just in the beginning stages of grasping music theory and that's perfectly alright. We have all been there. I think you might be confusing major intervals with major and minor chords that go with a given key. It is true that the note A natural is the 6th scale degree of the C major scale (key of C). It is also true that A ...


1

In addition to the other answers, you need to look at your ergonomics, which will not only improve speed but prevent injury. Musicians are small-muscle athletes and get injured without proper technique and warmup. Press a chord voicing on your guitar with your fingers as close behind the frets as possible. Playing one string at a time, lighten your finger ...


1

When you are on a certain chord for a bar, then, yes, it'll work. I presume a bar of C, using C scale notes, then a bar of E (dominant of A), where you could use E scale notes, leading to a bar of A, where A scale notes will work. What you need to bear in mind is that all these keys have some common notes, but they may not be chord notes. For example,all 3 ...


1

Well, it's going to be quite dissonant, because there are going to be a lot of notes clashing. The A major scale has C# and G# whereas the chord C has C and G natural.* So, those notes are going to create a dissonance. It will sound smoothly over the E and A chords, because E is the V of A, so the notes are the same. Keep in mind that the chord progression ...


3

It is indeed half-diminished. A diminished chord has root, m3, b5 and bb7. In F#o it'll be F#, A, C and Eb. The half dim., a.k.a. m7b5 differs only by the m7; E instead of Eb. Its 1st inversion is the root (inversion/position) of Am6.


13

A quick Google search which amounted to "what does a circle with a cross through it mean?" turns up this: http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/archive/index.php?t-637414.html The answer is: "Ø = half diminished, aka m7b5" This particular chord is played on piano as Credit to PianoChord.com


1

Welcome to the wonderful world of learning to play guitar. I think one of the must frustrating things for new aspiring guitarist in the beginning stages is learning to play chords. The strange and unusual shapes that your brain must get your fingers to contort into are unnatural and often very difficult in the beginning. Everyday life does not require ...


8

Hammer-ons. Rather than putting your fingers on the appropriate strings/frets one at a time, try to get them down as a hammer-on. After all, this is how, hopefully, you will end up forming them when you are playing. All fingers need to land together and firmly.You sort of make the chord shape before you smartly land them on the strings. Of course it'll take ...


1

Scales are in essence a series of notes a certain amount of intervals / semitones from each other. You can have the semi tones in any place in the scale. You can have various amount of notes in the scale. 8 notes in the scale is common as it represents all the scale degrees. Major Scales have the semitones between the third and fourth scale degrees and the ...


0

In my own experience, I used to think that in order to compose a happy tune, one must stay away from minor chords. This is NOT the case at all. The diatonic 6 chord (in c major, scale degree 6 is pitch A.) One can construct the diatonic chord (a chord that uses only notes that belong to the key one is using) with 'A' as the root (the pitch on which the chord ...


1

It speaks to why people play guitar. If you want to go to Juliard then just strumming your chords for several hours a day is not going to get you to there. To get a person who has that ambition is rather rare. What most people get into guitar for is just to play some popular songs with friends and family. There is off course nothing wrong with such an ...


2

One big reason is that playing arpeggios requires single note playing, often across strings. This is quite advanced compared to strumming all (or most) strings together, assuming you play with a pick. I am surprised your friends find it easier. Also, playing single notes requires greater coordination between the hands. I would also argue your point that ...


9

Actually you might be on to something. I know from teaching beginning guitarist (and from my own personal experience) that learning to contort your fingers and hands into the correct position to instantly finger a given chord is very difficult. Nothing in the natural everyday world provides any advance training for those type hand formations and movements -...


3

First, there's tradition ... from your Uncle Joe who played bluegrass with the boys for barn dances every Saturday night (or maybe his name was Bill and he covered CCR tunes in the local bars with his buddies) to popular teachers such as Mel Bay and the like. For years guitar method books would teach G, C, and D7 and then tell you that "anybody can play ...


3

Arpeggios generally start on the root, then sequentially play 3,5,8 and so on. Guitars can be used to play these, but they don't always relate exactly to chord shapes. Take a simple E maj. chord, and you find that it leaves out the major 3rd note that you'd play in the arpeggio on the 6th string 4th fret. O.k. the rest of the notes follow well, but the two ...



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