Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I once heard from a pianist that the chord you know is what you will hear in a song. This means that if you hear a song and hear a Dominant #5b9 and you were very familiar with dimished chords you will first interpret the chord you heard as a diminshed chord my advise is to learn the different chords. Go to apassion4jazz.net (something like that). You will ...


1

while triad-based chords imply specific harmonies, quartal chords are more generic and basically don't imply specific harmony in the key you're in, which means you can use them pretty much anyplace and in lieu of regular chord progressions. Quartals are more vague so they fit in a wide variety of situations. Quartals can also be thought of as voicings for ...


1

You can either use them as "sounds" in a more impressionistic way if you play a modal piece (just like on the whole "Kind of Blue" album mentioned in Shevliaskovic's answer). But if you want to play them in "the context of an existing harmony", assuming you mean standard harmony based on thirds, then you can try to figure out how those quartal chords are ...


2

A good example is used by Bill Evans on So What: Bill used the kind of chords you mentioned, while adding a third at the end. The theorists have categorized these kind of chords as ...


1

A 20 year old hardware Midi expander/arranger (Ketron MS40 is what I use, but there is a lot of different ones around) will be so much less painful than what you can make Linux software do that it isn't funny. Hydrogen is a reasonably workable drum arranger/sequencer readily available on Linux. It works directly via PCM so you avoid the lousy sample ...


1

Good answers here. These are my two cents: Know who your favorite producers are. Have a good sense for what you love and what you don't. Sometimes knowing what you don't want is more important than knowing what you do want. Do your homework - read everything you can about your favorite producers. Through interviews, you will gain insight into their ...


2

Ah, yes! This tip from Joe is one of my all time favorite things to meditate on. I especially like to pick voicings from the Joe Pass chord book, and apply this concept to them. I think that the main idea here is associating different sounds with chord voicings, and developing your ear to hear different harmonic possibilities over chords. Also, developing ...


1

Here is a link to Jamey Aebersold Jazz http://www.jazzbooks.com/ There is a great pdf that has a book relating to what you may need. http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


3

To understand how chords with 7ths work, you need to know the scale you are using. The chords most commonly used are built on thirds, so if you choose a scale and then a note from that scale, you'll see what chords are maj7 chords, by ascending thirds from the note you chose. * In the major scale, only the I and IV are major chords and have a major 7th. ...


7

Knowing what modes/scales to use over a chord can be approached a number of ways. Here's an over simplified way to know what scale you can use over a certain chord (DISCLAIMER: THIS IS OVERSIMPLIFIED): Is it Major? (R 3 5 7) Is the fourth sharped? (Yes - you might try Lydian) Otherwise, use Ionian or all of the above Is it Minor? (R b3 5 b7) Is the ...


0

G#dim7 is a rootless inversion for G7b9, making it a nice substitution for this type of chord. The b9 is an altered tension that goes well before a minor chord (look for the altered dominants in a minor 2-5-1). The G#dim7 kind of acts as a G7, which itself is a tritone substitution for a C#7. C#7 is the V7/II - secondary dominant for the II chord, F#m7 - ...


1

In my opinion, finding a scale fitting in a chord is a nice solution for jazz improvisation. Any scale or modes which does not conflict with the chord is a good option, even if you can not name the scale. The scale you see in the video he used for A7#5b9 is an A Altered scale (thanks to Matt). The concept of this video is, improvise a scale starts from the ...


-1

The Eb more typically comes at the top. I hear it much more as a flattened third than a sharpened 9th, so I prefer to label it C7(b10). People who want every chord to be built out of a pile of thirds may strongly disagree :-)


0

I usualy think in a simpler way. When I borrow a chord then everything around that chord behaves as it was in that particular mode keeping in mind the melody or the progression intention (what I want to express and what sounds like its going to ear wise) so when a IIb chord shows up the imediate response is phrygian or phrygian major 1b2345b6b7 or the ...


2

It is just convention. If you want, can find arguments for both symbols #9 or b10. For this reason I also think that arguments trying to show that one of the two is "wrong" are rather beside the point. One pragmatic reason to stick to #9 would just be because it's much more common, at least in the Anglo-Saxon world. But to give an example for b10: I live in ...


1

Andrais, even with the flat 7, I still think the effect is one of augmentation or suspension. When I see this chord used, it is over a major sonority, usually. You can skip the #9 (with all its excitement) and play the major chord without doing violence to the harmony. Try to substitute a minor triad only (without the major third) and it likely will not ...


6

It's because how we build chords. The most typical way to build chords is in thirds thus when we name intervals with respect to a chord we use odd intervals to represent them. Also note a 10th reduces to a 3rd which is one of the basic building blocks of chords. It doesn't make sense espically from a functional standpoint to have two thirds in a chord.


7

While most pop and jazz musicians would call this chord a ♯9 chord of some sort, classical people may say that the chord has split thirds, and a theory professor would say that the chord is the pitch class set [0,3,4,7]. There are a lot of ways to rationalize this chord, and any of these would be acceptable depending on who you speak to. If you're just ...


3

When you swap the G for the E, you get rid of a perfect 5th and get a major 3rd. That 5th is being played anyway on fret 5, D string. You end up with: Root Minor 3rd Major 3rd Perfect 5th If you want to see it strictly as a minor C chord, the E is a major 10th tension. This tension is not diatonic to any minor mode from the major scale, so it is an ...


4

Putting in the b7 as well makes it what is affectionately known as the Hendrix chord - 7#9. He didn't invent it - just loved using it. It sounds like the major and minor third are played within the same chord, but technically it's written as a #9. Usually 9ths will incorporate a 7th as well.In this case, a flat 7th. Without the 7th, it'll be, as already ...


17

I'd call it a Cadd#9 and there's a few reasons why. First of all if you think about the chord in terms of extensions a #9 is rather common and if you added a Bb to the chord you described people would hands down call that a C7#9 which is a common altered dominant chord. Second in general when naming chords we typically like to compare the notes to the ...


2

I wanted to add some information to the already-good answers, about how to properly "spell" this chord. Because chords are made up of stacked thirds, a seventh chord built on G will have to have some form of the notes G-B?-D?-F? (I'm using '?' to represent a yet-to-be-determined accidental). In the case of a Gdim7, these would become ...


1

FL Studio appears to support MIDI VST plugins - that's plugins that alter MIDI data, rather than audio. Tobybear had a chorder in his MIDIBag package (apparently still available at http://www.tobybear.de/files.html, though his main site is offline now), and http://hgsounds.com/news/vst-plugins/arp/setting-up-midi-vst-plugins-in-fl-studio/ describes how you ...


2

The second chord is not D half diminished as there's no C in the score at that point. However there's a B there, so this is F dim, which is an inversion of B dim. So this is a dominant function to C (normally the F in the bass would resolve down to an E), which means it can be replaced by G7. The Ab in the melody automatically makes it a G7b9.


1

Further to the two excellent answers already here.In 4/4 time, the basic strum is down, down, down, down. This represents the 4 beats per bar. In between, the strumming hand comes up. That gives potentially another four strums- upstrums. So, there are now 8 strums available per bar. Given that you can do everything from all 8 strums to ony one per bar, with ...


0

As a starting place, a typical pattern that I always teach every student is: DOWN MISS DOWN UP MISS UP DOWN MISS The misses are also up and down so that the first miss of the strings in this pattern is an up swing of the arm where you do not play the strings. The second miss is a down and the third is an up. Sometimes this is expanded to: down miss ...


2

Welcome to Music: Practice and Theory Stack Exchange. Your question is one I get often from folks in the beginning stages of learning to play guitar. You are absolutely correct in stating that knowing just the chords is not sufficient information to play the song in an authentic manner. The guitar (especially if played as a solo instrument) is a rhythm ...


3

The nature of any diminished chord is going to be harsh as just the natural spelling of the chord outlines the tritone used in it. Simple voice leading and making sure the tritone does not show up in the outer voices. This is why it is rather typical to see a diminished chord in an inversion As to why going from iim75b to bVII7 and vii° to V7 you have to ...


2

Such softenings typically require an underlying key that enable to replace a chord by an other one that has common notes, but that makes you stay into the key. The softenings iim75b -> bVII7 and vii° -> V7 presuppose an underlying minor key in which these chords are included. However, ivm75b chords don't imply a key as clearly. It might then be necessary to ...


1

Why does it seem to work so well? The ♭VII major chord has a strong harmonic relationship to the tonic. Within the first few harmonics (with most instruments) there are overtones that approximately correspond to the lowered seventh and the second degrees of the tonic scale, which are the first and third of the ♭VII chord: 1st harmonic = fundamental ...


5

I usually use this chord as an upper structure of a D13(b9) chord: (D) C Eb F# B Used in that way, it is an altered dominant chord. It could also be the upper structure of an Ab7(#9) chord: (Ab) C Eb Gb B Of course, this is also an altered dominant chord. But it can also function as a chord in its own right, i.e. not only as an upper structure. In that ...


1

Riff on these chords: C Eb F Eb C Now try: C Bb C Bb... (On Broadway) How about: F C G D A (Let's do the Time Warp again) Have your fixed ideas of what is allowed in a popular song loosened up a bit? :-) No need for special arguments about shifting mode. In C major you can use chords of Eb, Bb (and a whole lot more) without changing key, mode or ...


0

The article is poorly written. But if you look a little further down, it clearly states "C maj7(♯5) usually resolves to F."


1

The other answers are best. But do also make sure you've actually got the key of the song correct. (I mention that just because people often learn the rule "songs have chord progressions comprised of notes from the scale of the song's key" at about the same time as rules like "songs have chord progressions beginning and ending on the root", or "songs have ...


2

To supplement the previous answers, I would say that the diminished vii° chord formed from the notes of the major scale is unsatisfactory for many musical styles due to its dissonance (it has a tritone instead of a perfect fifth). When a consonant triad on the seventh degree is wanted, the easiest solution is to chromatically lower the root of the chord. ...


5

There are already some good answers, but I'd like to add an important term for a concept which is able to explain really a lot of occurrences of non-diatonic chords in popular music (and not only there). The concept is called modal interchange [1], which is the borrowing of chords from parallel tonalities. The borrowing of chords from the parallel minor key ...


-2

Probably because the song is actually in the key of C maj. Just because a song starts with a certain chord doesn't always mean that is the key. Apart from this, there are many reasons for putting Gmaj with Fmaj. Best not to think about it too hard and just rely on time and experience to guide you. Learn as many songs as you can and you'll start to see the ...


1

Casey and Dan's answers are great. To add to Casey's, the F leads nicely to Em. In Roman numerals, this would be VII -> vi. Pink Floyd uses this progression on Dark Side of the Moon, in the song Breathe (and maybe another song on that album as well). When used well, non-diatonic chords really do amazing things to music!


11

On a basic level, this is just a modal chord progression using the Mixolydian mode, which contains a b7 scale degree. That makes the notes you're using G A B C D E F G. The G major triad (G B D) and the F major triad (F A C) are both right in there. But doesn't necessarily reconcile other chords aside from those two (assuming not all the songs you're talking ...


15

I would argue that your premise that the chords used in a song should be comprised of notes that occur in the scale of the tonic key doesn't really hold. Yes, the majority of songs tend to use almost exclusively diatonic triads, however, there are many example of non-diatonic chords, for instance, borrowed chords and secondary dominants. In traditional ...


1

Check out the Nashville Number System. I won't describe it here, as I believe it's been featured in other answers, and readily available through Google. If - you're talking about transposing on guitar, if the original is played using only barre chords, then they can all be moved up by the same number of frets. Gets tricky moving down, sometimes, though, as ...


3

All chord progressions can be labelled by the degree of the chord within the scale. Most chord progressions will contain the I, IV and V major chords. They also may contain a ii, iii, or vi minor chord or a diminished 7th. Some chord progressions will contain other variants but every key has only certain type chords that can be derived from the notes in ...


0

Sure there's an easy way - you basically just use the alphabet! If your song is in A and you want to play in B - just "add 1" to each chord letter A->B, D->E, F#m -> G#m It's not always so simple but in many cases this works just fine. You'll also typically find you play in only a few keys - I rarely end up in anything other than C, G, A, or E and that you ...


1

C minor chord might be worth considering, especially for the ending. This makes a cool chord progression of C - Cm - G. (which is IV-iv-I in the key of G).


4

This is a good example of a non-dominant diminished chord with a diatonic function (i.e. resolving to a diatonic chord). Note that often diminished chords function as dominants. This is the case when the root of the diminished chord is the leading tone to the root of the diatonic resolution chord. However, in your example this is not the case because then ...


3

Maybe because Gdim7 is the same thing as C♯dim7? That means that, between the C♯m7 and the F♯m7, two notes are going to be held from the first chord, mainly C♯ and E, and there is going to be descending chromatic motion in parallel minor thirds between G♯ and B in the C♯m7, and F♯ and A in the F♯m7, because the remaining two notes of the C♯dim 7 are G and ...


0

YES, but if you RE-NAME the C as B#. Yes B# is the enharmonic equivalent of C. But because the C is assigned to C# we have to bump up the B to take the place of the C. It's a linguistic wordplay game but it is necessary for the rules of the game we have chosen to play. examples: C#maj7 = C# E# G# B# A#m(add9) = A# C# E# B# F#maj7#11 = F# A# C# E# B# ...


2

Here is what I hear: || Dmaj9 | D/C | Bbmaj7 | Ab7 | D(add 9) || The logic behind it - at least the way I hear it - is the bass line moving down in (major) seconds. The Bbmaj7 is borrowed from D minor (and it is what you correctly hear as iv, i.e. Gm7, which is basically the same thing as a Bbmaj7). I must admit that I don't have a good idea for ...


0

The chord could have a Chromatic non chordal note that has a C#. If say for argument sake we are G Major and we go from IV to V we may have a non chord note that forms the baseline C-C#-D


1

Following the two excellent answers, Im7 can be used in place of I7, leading, as it usually does to IV. As in C - Cm7 - F. The Cm7 can come over as Eb6, but by keeping the root at the bottom, it works as a dominant of F. Example found in 'The Lady Is a Tramp'. That change from C to seemingly a non-diatonic chord a minor third above can appear subtle and 'in ...



Top 50 recent answers are included