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1

You have two things going on here. In general, it's given the chord Fm7 because that's the general quality of the A section. You can tell by the bass line, which is 1 5 7 8 — three out of four of the notes of the Fm7 (lacking only the third, which is given to you by the right hand). That said, the scale is an F dorian scale, so it's OK to have those ...


2

I wouldn't say that this is exactly in Fm7. Fm7 could be played on top of the melody, and it would sound good. Here's why: (1st beat) First chord is clearly Fm: F, Ab, C. (2nd and 3rd beat) Bb and D are passing notes that go to C and Eb respectively. The bass is C and the chord could be Cm (no5), that sounds good over the F minor chord, because it's like ...


1

The way I see it is this: the root is definitely F. What is happening on top is a standard F dorian pattern. The basic seventh chord in F dorian is Fm7, so in a lead sheet when you want to write down a simple harmony, the best choice is Fm7. You're of course right that this chord is implicit, but out of all basic seventh chords with root F, the only one that ...


3

How then can we say that this is an Fm7? That's just our best evaluation of the situation. This is the not-so-secret truth behind music theory: it does not absolutely dictate or categorize music in all cases. It's just a guide and framework to help us communicate about musical ideas, but many musical ideas defy the conventions of music theory, and in ...


3

As mentioned in a comment by Caleb Hines, there is no clear-cut definition of the concept of stability in music. When talking about chords, the two notions of stability that I consider most important are the stability with respect to a given key, and the stability of a chord without any context. In a given key, the tonic is perceived as the most stable ...


4

The concept of tonality is partially based on the idea that certain chords "want" to go to other chords. For instance, the dominant (V) wants to go to the tonic (I), mostly because it has the leading tone (scale degree 7). A more complex example is the augmented sixth chord. The augmented sixth is VERY unstable, because it has two notes (the flat-sixth and ...


1

Broken chords are in essence just a type of arpeggiation the difference being the order in which the notes are played. This is more like an arpeggio. . And this is something more like a broken chord.


3

A simple Google search for guitar chords will find many versions. Some are printable and some are best viewed on line as an interactive device. Here is one that seems quite thorough, is easy to read, and can be printed or saved on your computer. It's a free download and I just downloaded two copies of it to my computer. Click this link Free Guitar Chord ...


3

This PDF seems pretty thorough: http://www.guitaralliance.com/acoustic_package/strummingschool/chords/Voicings.pdf


1

"Arpeggio" is literally "like a harp". Notes are not stopped before playing the next note. If you take a look how a harp plays a multi-octave chord or run, you have to alternate hands and play the fingers one by one (to give the inactive hand time to move to its next position without interrupting the flow of the arpeggiated phrase). When arpeggiating on a ...


3

Well every arpeggio is a broken chord, but not every broken chord is an arpeggio. A broken chord is just as it sounds: a chord that is broken up in some way, shape, or form where you are not playing the the full chord at once. An arpeggio is a specific way of playing a broken chord that has a defined texture to it. While the definition is not a very ...


1

No, this site here isn't that kind of site. We can help you out if you want with something in your cover, but asking for a review isn't something that will be of much help to future users, which is what this site pretty much aims for.


1

ABRSM seems to think there is a difference in that broken chords are played, in the earlier exams, as 1,3,5,3,5,8,5,8,10,8, then in reverse. Or using a 4 note pattern. Sorry, I don't have exam books to hand till tomorrow!. Whereas arpeggios go 1,3,5,8,5,3,1, or 1,3,5,8,10,12,15,12,10,8,5,3,1 for two octaves, etc. The sequence would appear to be different, ...


5

Would this fall into the boundaries of harmony? The answer is simple and it's yes. There are many kinds of harmony. The blues harmony is different than the jazz which is different than the classical etc.


1

From the perspective of piano, a measure that has a clear arpeggiation may or may not have an indication to use the pedal, which would pretty much leave every note to ring until it was released. Not pedaling would, in turn, have a more staccato effect. In my experience, it's either called "pedalling," which is fairly straightforward, but which only relates ...


2

You can use English: let vibrate Or Italian: l.v. lasciar vibrare


2

Uhm, arpeggio? "Leave all the notes ringing together" (the effect depending on the sustain of the respective instrument, so one pretty much needs a percussive instrument) is rather the definition of arpeggio. Otherwise you have something else, like a broken chord. You cannot arpeggiate on a monophonic instrument (like voice or most wind instruments).


5

Most of your name suggestions aren't wrong. Chords and lyrics sheet -> This seems a bit long, but it is accurate, since it describes exactly what we are looking at Chord charts [with lyrics]-> Short and to the point. Music chord tabs -> Tabs seems wrong here, because you don't include a tablature in your app. Lead sheet -> Like Tim said, the app isn't a ...


2

I agree that you need further medical advice; in the mean time, I've used the flattened first segment of my little finger as a mini-bar for "A-form" chords for years (it's just the right length to cover 3 strings, combined with a normal first finger 6 string bar.) Naturally, this works best if your guitar's neck action is not too high and uncomfortable.


1

As Tim describes, there are two different skills here: picking accuracy (don't hit strings you don't need) and muting (don't let strings ring out if it's too hard to avoid hitting them). And you should practice both. Good exercises for picking accuracy are: scales, arpeggios, root-chord-root-chord strumming patterns. Good exercises for muting: funk -- ...


1

Lots of chords played on guitar are not played using all 6 strings. Mainly it's down to voicing, with a sometimes odd sounding note at the bottom, and sometimes it's because a string somewhere in the middle needs muting, as a good note cannot be found to play on it. Chords can have as few as 3 notes (some argue 2 constitutes a chord), so 3 can be an answer ...


1

To play any song, you would need to get beyond "learning chords" because there comes a point where it just doesn't work like that any more. However, there are thousands of songs you can accompany with three chords: A root, a fourth and a fifth. The easiest set like this is D, G, A. | D | G | A | This lets you sing lots of folk, rock'n'roll songs etc. ...


-2

I would learn all the basic chords (C, D, E, F, G, A, B)


1

Ultimately it is 'what sounds good' or fits the emotion/aesthetic/story/etc. you are trying to convey. Personally I have not beeen helped by theory/rules when it comes to playing a melody over a chord progression. You can learn (induce) the rules/theory that make up a particular style/aesthetic by learning to play, playing along or experimenting over a piece ...


0

You can always try and see what fits, but there are some notes that might fit better than others. Every chord consists of some notes. If you play those notes as a melody on top of the chord, it will sound nice. Chords belong in scales. So, you can play notes from the scale you are in, on top of a chord. Not all the notes of the scale will sound consonant, ...


2

If you think a minor chord is sad, try a fully-diminished chord. The sadness seems to come from the minor third in its prominent position. A diminished chord has 4 of these, splaying out across the octave, at the nexus, the infinite-point of unresolved wrt to the tonic. C - E♭ - G♭ - A (or B ♭♭ to be more proper). ...


4

Generally, it's good to practice everything everywhere. This helps you get to know the instrument you're playing better (this doesn't apply only to guitar) and helps you learn how to transpose the songs. But, if you still cannot play a song in a certain key, there isn't much point in transposing it. It might help if you transposed it into something that had ...


1

Hello to all the guys and gals out there, "sorry this is a long answer" I have sympathy for all the people who struggle with muting either the d or b string or in fact any string, I have the same prob on "some" guitars,, I was extremely frustrated so decided to do a simple study, I read all the articles and advice from people saying press harder ,build up ...


1

If you're talking about keyboard playing, beware of playing close position chords in the LH. That register can get muddy, and it's where bass lines (or maybe counter-melodies), not chords, belong. If you want a C chord, play the notes of a C chord. Colouring it by adding the 6th (A) or major 7th (B) is harmonically neutral. The minor 7th (Bb) turns it ...


2

Taking your theory further, you could , while on that E melody note, play a G# as well. Now it stops sounding so good! The E melody note is contained, as Dom says, within the C maj chord. Playing an Emaj. chord wouldn't (usually) work as the G# is not in the Cmaj. set of notes - it's not diatonic. The B sometimes works, as it makes a Cmaj.7 chord, and of ...


1

The notes of a C major chord are C, E, and G. To fill out the chord if the melody has a E you could play the missing notes C and G. It's the simplest and most effect way of filling in the rest of the chord. There are other options though that I will explain. If you are playing with others you have a lot more freedom in your voicing and as long as you are ...


2

This is what I have been taught in High school and university: Theoretically, you can say that G11 is the chord with the notes G, B, D, F, A and C. But in practice, the third (in this case B) should be omitted, because of the dissonance! The 5th (the note D in G11) may be omitted, but not necessarily. So in practice G11 is the same as G9sus4. This is also ...


2

Of course you can. With modern harmonic practice, the underlying harmony can be almost anything you want. Since the melody is related to a minor, this could be relatively simple. If you previously were on an E7 chord and are going to a d minor chord, then you could put an a minor under this melody. Harmonies, though, occur in context. From the three notes ...


0

First off, let's examine what chords are used in this song. There are many versions of the transcription of this song, most do not have the F#7 and instead have just a F#m which after listening to the song to confirm seems right: F#m A B E D C#7 All the chord besides the B,which can be viewed as borrowed from the parallel major key of F# major, can be ...


0

To me this just seems obviously to be in F# minor. So: Main riff: i III IV Bridge: VII i VII V7 Then the D and A chords give a D majorish, D lydian kind of sound but it still ends with a VII i cadence so you could maybe argue we're still in F#minor. chorus: VI(I) III(V) VII(II) i(iii) Then the C#7 at the end of the chorus works to take us back squarely ...


1

The version I listened to is in B, using B, E and F#. The sus2 on the F# is under, not on top as in that tab version. So it's not going to sound the same. Tab is notorious for being inaccurate (at least in my opinion!), so this version is likely a simplified one. It will sort of work on guitar with a capo (on fret 4), but still won't be a faithful copy of ...


0

It depends on what else is going on. If nothing, then I use 1,3,4. But sometimes you're playing variations so you'll bar and use your free fingers to find the variations. In short, if you're accurate with the pick and mute the strings not being played, then it doesn't matter... heck, some guys bar just because it leaves the middle finger free and they ...


1

The manner in which I used the term and it may very well be incorrect is that instead of using your Index / Middle and Ring finger to hold down the open E Major chord you do with the next set of three left hand fingers (Middle, Ring and Pinky) This leads to having your Index finger free to bar when you go from the open E chord to any of the various E shape ...


3

For rock blues and metal styles (thumb up top) the only time you should barre is with power chords with the root on the G string (144). All other 3 note power chords are 134 with the exception of the sixth string root which may be T34.or 134. Which is a matter of preference. The important part is muting the unplayed strings. The index finger must mute any ...


4

While either are correct, there are subtle differences for each fingering that can be taken advantage of especially when going from power chord to barre chord. You can and should take advantage of the different types of fingerings. The 1,3,4 fingering for power chords let's you take advantage of the E major, E minor, A minor, D major, and D minor shaped ...


3

Half position in reference to a barre chord using one finger to bar 2-5 notes instead of all 6 strings. There's a lot of chords that don't to be fully barred. Simple example is there is a "mini" version of the typical F chord that is: %X/X.X/X.3/3.2/2.1/1.1/1[F] Notice only two notes are barred so you are in half position. The distinction is made so you ...


1

Learning to quickly form certain chords often takes an abundant amount of repetitive practice. There is not really a magic order of finger placement to make the chord in question easier to form quickly. The chord you describe is commonly referred to as an "A shaped barre chord". That chord shape is form of "movable" barre chord that can be used to play ...


0

The voicings you wrote are two root position chords, specifically V to I, resolving in parallel. This is the absolute most basic way to "voice" these chords and is generally considered cheesy and un-interesting, mostly because the sounds is boring, or maybe too strong of a resolution for the middle of the piece, maybe ok at the end. It is a very flat, ...


0

"All I want is to make song more dynamic, dramatic, more colorful." That is very vague and I have trouble understanding what you are asking. If you are trying to make music, everyone wants to make it more colorful, dramatic, and dynamic. So please forgive me if I answer the wrong question. Pop music uses the same few chords, often, and the use of them is ...


0

My saxophone teacher gave me an exercise for practicing the arpeggios of various chords in a given key that contain the root note. The form might be difficult to play on guitar, but I think it could be a useful exercise on piano. The different chords are mostly formed by changing one chord tone by a half step each time. Each arpeggio returns to the root of ...


-1

You can also try half positions. Instead of using your I-M-A fingers for the left hand use the M-I and pinky. This will allow you to lock your hands and just slide the wholly affair down as you like. The economy of movement is much better like this and you get the added benefit of training your less intelligent left hand fingers (Looking at you pinky) Hope ...


0

With time and practice, everything gets easier. Consider just playing the best you can for now, so that you don't stunt creativity by slowing progress while trying to be perfect. As you get more comfortable with playing in general, you'll find it easy some day to add it in the extra notes.


4

The point of avoiding certain parallels is not that it would "sound bad". On the contrary, it sounds really good - so good that for centuries, this was the only kind of polyphony anyone ever used. The point is rather that if you want to write a polyphonic piece of music (and that was a radically, heretically new idea at th time), you'd better not lead your ...


6

It depends on what you are trying to do. If you are using the chords as harmonic colour, parallel triads work fine. If you need some independence between the voices, parallel octaves and fifths aren't so good. Both with and without are perfectly acceptable, and have been since the end of the 19th century, provided you accomplish what you are setting out to ...


3

Slide it, Man! In your "impossible" transition, I'm assuming you are already fingering an open A chord. The 2,3 and 4 fingers are in the same position as the B chord, right? Just two frets down (toward the nut). So, just leave them in position and "slide" them up to fret 4, then as they come into position plop your index finger for the barre. This will ...



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