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3

The verse is just plain E minor. I understand your initial confusion, but you have to remember that you can bring things in from outside the key without changing the key. In this the harmony is simply built on and utilizes the different scales used for minor which are the natural, harmonic, and melodic minor. If you were to naturally build 7th chords off ...


3

Here is a quick basic analysis of the passage in question. Note that the first note in the bass in your edition is wrong (it should be an F, and is in the Schotts Söhne edition I've copied here). The notes under crosses are all accented non-harmonic notes; as such, they are resolving into chord tones in the following quavers. That's not to say that they ...


2

The whole last measure looks like V to me and I would even consider it V7 as there is a Bb in the measure. There does appear to be a lot of non-harmonic tones in this section, but if you look start at the beginning of the measure, you can see how the harmony creates a V7 chord. V1: (F) E (D) C (D) E V2: G C (B) C Bb C VC: C C ...


2

You're right that this is a very common chord shape, and it would be good to get it under control. Is the problem your hand size? Can you reach an octave without too much effort? The best simplification would be to drop the low B (and finger the remaining notes 1-3-5). B is the third of the chord, which least needs to be doubled, especially in a lower ...


3

The minor pentatonic scale is just the minor scale without two notes (the 2nd scale degree and the 6th). Any harmony that you can create with the notes of the minor scale also work for the pentatonic scale. So all 6 natural power chords in C minor (C5, Eb5, F5, G5, Ab5, and Bb5) you can use with the minor pentatonic scale as there is at least one note in ...


1

Power chords (As in Root-fifth-octave) don't have a minor or major quality (they lack a third). Buuuut, you could imply a major or minor tonality by following the scale degrees. The Cm pentatonic scale is C Eb F G Bb. If you want to stick to pentatonic, you could use any of the above. For example, C5-F5-G5 would do a I-IV-V progression, which is super ...


3

Extended chord are just chords that have extra notes added to them to color the harmony. The 3 main ways they are typically used are: Highlighting notes in the Melody The harmony and melody should always be working together. The melody will typically play chord tones and what are known as non-harmonic tones. If certain non-harmonic tones stick out and ...


4

I do not know where you read this term "highly unstable", but what you are referring to is its function in a chord progression. In the key of C major, G7 is the dominant seventh chord, meaning that it has a particular function. In music theory, the dominant seventh chord appears at the point of the musical phrase that has the most musical tension. After the ...


7

It's because of the dissonant tritone interval B-F that wants to resolve. The B leads to the C (root) and the F leads to the E (major third of the C major triad). This is the traditional view. Note that e.g. in the blues, a dominant seventh chord is not considered unstable; it's used as the basic chord on the I, IV, and V.


8

This is an Ab major 7 flat 5 (Abmaj7(b5)) chord (if you hear Ab as its root). Many people would call it an Abmaj7(#11), because the b5 and the #11 are enharmonically the same note, and if you have a #11 you almost never have the perfect fifth in the chord anyway. I often use this voicing (from low to high): Ab G C D In the key of Bb major, this chord can ...


1

A good way is to try and write a simple bassline, and see what sounds good. It's easy to come up with note clusters higher up where the root note is ambiguous, but much harder (but not impossible) to hide from it lower down the pitch scale. Also, make up a melody that fits your chords. Then write a bassline that fits that same melody, and that could point ...


0

As a contrary to the selected answer, allow me to illustrate how the first 4 chords are perfectly functional in the key of E EΔ YOU SEE IT'S TRUEEEEEE C#7 AN APE LIKE MEEEEEE F#7 KINDA LIKE TO BE B7 E7 B7 HUUUU UMAN TOOOOO


3

Patrx2 and Dom's answers are both very good. To add to them: Usually I determine the root (C or A) taking into account clues like: The happy or sad feel of it all I think Patrx said it quite well, I would add that minor sounds darker to most people than major, but adding meaning and emotional content to the sound is the function of the artist, it ...


3

Check your phrase ends/points of cadence, also your "roof" and "floor" (the successions of highest notes in the treble, lowest notes in the bass). Dom is quite correct that a lot of music doesn't start with the tonic. Starting deceptively has been a valid technique since at least C.P.E. Bach and Joseph Haydn. Establishing a tonality is often an active ...


3

You don't need to start on i or I on any piece of music and one chord alone will never tell you what key you are in. You need more context to actually know what's going on. The rest of the progression will tell you what key you're in especially when you come across dominants chords and cadences. If you encounter a lot of E7 chords I'd expect it to be in A ...


2

Chord symbols are very explicit in telling you what chord you are playing. A C#7 is a C# dominant 7th spelled C#, E#, G#, B. Any chord with a note and a 7 is a dominant 7th. Here's a simple breakdown of chords based on chord symbols. To keep this general, we'll use C as an example, but this is for any root note: Triads C = C major = root, major 3rd, ...


4

There are a lot of different ways you can look at naming chord in general. I see two very likely candidates for the name, but first let's clean up some note naming so it's a little easier to see. Let's not call the Db a Db, but it's enharmonic equivalent C# as it will make the naming much simpler. We could look at it as some kind of B chord. In this case we ...


1

It's a G6 chord: 3 x 2 4 3 x (from low E to high e, counted from the capo); due to the capo it sounds like an Ab6 chord. If you like you could just replace it by a standard G chord.


5

The name is indeed tetrad, as pointed out in a comment by Shevliaskovic. However, this term is not very common. Standard tetrads built in thirds are almost always referred to as seventh-chords. The problem is that there are two common four-part chords (yes, that's actually a very good name!) that are no seventh chords, because they contain a major sixth ...


3

the word triad is not specific to music and simply means a group of three. In general the series is, monad, diad, triad, tetrad, pentad, hexad, heptad etc. Check out this list of polygon names (http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/qq/database/QQ.09.96/rosa1.html) I'm reasonably sure you can just replace the letters "agon" with "ad" should you ever need more than ...


1

A chord analysis has less to do with the the chords that are traditionally at each tone degree and more with what notes you see in front of you. Yes the Sub Mediant chord in a Major scale is a Major chord but what happens when an accidental is used and this chord does suddenly not conform to the norm? You need to be able to look at any chord and tell me is ...


5

Everything you analyze in roman numeral analysis needs to reflect the key you are in and where the chord comes from. If the chord is not in the key, it needs to be marked appropriately. There is no scenario where you would mark a C7 as vi7 in the key of E major because: The standard vi chord in E major is C#, thus a root of C needs to be denoted with a ...


4

Chords outside the key that you find within a piece of real-world music are called Secondary Dominants or Borrowed Chords. Or in some cases the music may temporarily modulate from the main key into a related key and then back to the main key again. In that case you would see several chords in sequence that outline the modulation to the different key. There ...


-1

Aaah, yep to all the above but lets make this a bit easier(?). find a song on youtube (frankly, you can put the name of the song on the internet and search for "(name of song) Chord or TABS" and poof ya got all right there...for free)! If you want to figure it out on your own (just for the fun of it)...then attempt to play along with the music and if you can ...


1

The cycle of fifths and the Phrygian mode are more or less orthogonal concepts. They're not mutually exclusive, but neither will do a good job supporting the other without support from other elements of the music. The Phrygian mode requires careful attention to establish the mode and its final (modal equivalent to a tonic), whereas a cycle of fifths ...


0

Matt is correct, this is characteristic of Flamenco music, assuming E is the root. This question is pretty vague, but I interpret it as saying the song is in A minor and but stays on E and F for extended periods of time during the instrumental, I would associate it with 80's metal, specifically, Randy Rhoads. He popularized the use of harmonic minor in ...


7

I think you're referring to Flamenco music. Its characteristic scale is the harmonic minor scale, which in Flamenco is often used starting from the 5th note, i.e. its 5th mode is used. That scale is usually called phrygian dominant. The notes of the phrygian dominant scale starting on E (i.e., A harmonic minor) are: E F G# A B C D Its main characteristics ...


1

When you talk about resolutions, you always have to look at how the notes move. Let's first look at C7 to F which can be looked at as I7 to IV, but most people would be more tempted to look at is as a tonic-dominant relationship (V7 to I). C -> C or G if root E -> F G -> F or A Bb -> A There are certain features about this that are very ...


2

The reason why C7-F (I7-IV) sounds good, is because the C7 is the V7 of F. So, the C7-F wouldn't exactly be I7-V, but V7-I in F. The reason C7-F might not sound that good is the above. The C7 has E, which is the leading tone that leads to F. The ear wants to go there. But if you like the sound of C7-G, there is no law against it. It is an unexpected ...


1

I think it will help you more to look at the chords in closed position to get an understanding of how the chord itself,G7, is built and what the inversions are and why. The picture above is equivalent in nature to the one in your example, but for simplicity the chords are in closed position. Now let's look at the leftmost chord which is G7 in root ...


1

The book didn't make a mistake. Think of the root inversion as the zeroth inversion - or as I prefer not an inversion at all. Then the chord in measure 2 is the first inversion, measure 3 is the 2nd inversion and measure 4 is the 3rd inversion.


0

Generally the term extended chords refers to chords that have notes added beyond the 7th (such as 9th, 11th and 13th chords). Your question is very general so it's hard to give a concise answer. Often, an extended chord would have a similar function to a triad or a 7th chord built on the same root, and an extended chord would be used to get a richer or ...


0

You can think of an open minor tuning D-A-D-F-A-D or in other words E string a whole step down A string as is D string as is G string down a whole step B string down a whole step High E down a whole step. That would give an open minor D chord. You can then go for the first finger on the G (F now) string to make a F# and turn the whole thing into a Major ...


2

A form of F♯m11. As there's F♯, C♯, A, the triad of F♯m, with a ♭7 (E) and a 4 (B). 11ths sometimes have the 9th missing, as in this case, but must have a 7th of some sort. Can't be called a sus 4, as the 3 is still there. Often guitar needs to omit something, as it's not easily available to finger/fret. The ...


0

Adding to Dom's comprehensive answer, there's also Amaj., Dmaj, and Emaj., all found as dominants to the minor keys of D, G and A respectively, mentioned above. There are also chords which fit songs from the parallel keys. D minor's being D major. Thus D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm and Co. So, for each list, change the parent key maj. to min., and vice versa. This ...


5

The key you are in defines the harmony, what chords you naturally have access to, and what the tonic is. From a single chord alone you cannot determine for sure either the key or the tonic, especially for a minor chord which doesn't have as strong a pull towards other chords as, say, a dominant chord. There are a few possibilities depending which key you ...


0

Blues approach: from chordnote to chordnote Descending: Notes triad (vertical) mixed with (horizontal) descending (doubled) appoggiaturas : C Bes A (As) G // G Fis F E // E Es D (Des) C ( rem. Bes here is not a vertical chord note!) Ascending: Notes triad (vertical) mixed with ascending (doubled)appoggiaturas: C D Dis E // E F Fis G // G (As) A C ...


1

You want Band-in-a-Box. It is extremely rich and powerful for generating accompaniment tracks. If you are on Android tablet, iPad or iPhone or Mac OS X, there is also iReal Pro. It is very simple to use, but its results are not as good as those created by Band-in-a-Box. iReal Pro also has thousands of song charts of jazz and pop standards available for ...


1

You have two things going on here. In general, it's given the chord Fm7 because that's the general quality of the A section. You can tell by the bass line, which is 1 5 7 8 — three out of four of the notes of the Fm7 (lacking only the third, which is given to you by the right hand). That said, the scale is an F dorian scale, so it's OK to have those ...


2

I wouldn't say that this is exactly in Fm7. Fm7 could be played on top of the melody, and it would sound good. Here's why: (1st beat) First chord is clearly Fm: F, Ab, C. (2nd and 3rd beat) Bb and D are passing notes that go to C and Eb respectively. The bass is C and the chord could be Cm (no5), that sounds good over the F minor chord, because it's like ...


1

The way I see it is this: the root is definitely F. What is happening on top is a standard F dorian pattern. The basic seventh chord in F dorian is Fm7, so in a lead sheet when you want to write down a simple harmony, the best choice is Fm7. You're of course right that this chord is implicit, but out of all basic seventh chords with root F, the only one that ...


3

How then can we say that this is an Fm7? That's just our best evaluation of the situation. This is the not-so-secret truth behind music theory: it does not absolutely dictate or categorize music in all cases. It's just a guide and framework to help us communicate about musical ideas, but many musical ideas defy the conventions of music theory, and in ...


4

As mentioned in a comment by Caleb Hines, there is no clear-cut definition of the concept of stability in music. When talking about chords, the two notions of stability that I consider most important are the stability with respect to a given key, and the stability of a chord without any context. In a given key, the tonic is perceived as the most stable ...


5

The concept of tonality is partially based on the idea that certain chords "want" to go to other chords. For instance, the dominant (V) wants to go to the tonic (I), mostly because it has the leading tone (scale degree 7). A more complex example is the augmented sixth chord. The augmented sixth is VERY unstable, because it has two notes (the flat-sixth and ...


1

Broken chords are in essence just a type of arpeggiation the difference being the order in which the notes are played. This is more like an arpeggio. . And this is something more like a broken chord.


3

A simple Google search for guitar chords will find many versions. Some are printable and some are best viewed on line as an interactive device. Here is one that seems quite thorough, is easy to read, and can be printed or saved on your computer. It's a free download and I just downloaded two copies of it to my computer. Click this link Free Guitar Chord ...


3

This PDF seems pretty thorough: http://www.guitaralliance.com/acoustic_package/strummingschool/chords/Voicings.pdf



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