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I read somewhere that any melody line can be harmonized using the I,IV and V chords of the major scale. The reasoning behind this being that any possible note played in the melody will exist in one of these chords. Firstly, that reasoning only makes sense if the imagined melody line that stays within the major scale. The idea will 'fail' for any ...


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First off a power chord is a modern name for something that has been around forever in music which is the perfect 5th specifically parallel fifths when used in succession. There is nothing special about the use of them in modern music or classical music and in fact when the melody is introduced the full chord is typically shown in the harmony regardless of ...


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I read somewhere that any melody line can be harmonized using the I,IV and V chords of the major scale. The reasoning behind this being that any possible note played in the melody will exist in one of these chords. My question is whether this is true, and if not, in what context would this idea fail? I'm going to try and take a stab at this. ...


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This is generally true of a melody in a major key. However, things can be more complicated in actual usage. If the melody contains chromatic notes that are not in the key, the basic three chords may not work. Also if the melody modulates into an entirely different key than the original key, it won't work either. There are many songs where the melody does ...


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The I,IV,V are the basic chords in a scale. The other chords (ii,iii,vi, vii) can be 'created' from these chords by substituting some notes for some other. Let's take the C major scale: I: C,E,G IV: F,A,C V: G,B,D The remaining chords are: ii: D,F,A -- Take IV, remove C and add D. iii: E,G,B -- Take V, remove D and add E. vi: A,C,E -- Take I, remove G and ...


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There are several correct answers, but the best is clearly C C/B Amin7. Points other answer missed: Second inversion chords are fairly unusual, and mostly used in cadences. They are particularly "weak", and there's no functional reason to call your second chord an Emin7/B. What is the chord doing? That's the entire question here and why we have the topic ...


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Many (perhaps even most) chords played on guitar could be correctly identified (by itself) as more than one chord! The most appropriate name to use in a given context depends on - the context. Chords in a song don't appear by themselves. They appear as part of the entire song. Things to consider when choosing which of several possible names to call a ...


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C/B could be called an Eminor chord with a minor 6th in second inversion; it's the same thing. It really depends on where you want to go with harmony. Both are valid and both are commonly used, so I cannot decide for sure which one to choose. Both C - C/B - Am7 and Am7/C, Am7/B, Am7 seem correct in a chord progression. I would suggest to look at the melody ...


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Em6 is actually confusing, as it's an Em chord, but the 6th bit is a major 6th - C#. So it can't be that anyway. Best call the sequence C, Am7/B, Am7. That way, musos would see the transition between C and Am7 with an altered Am7 chord sandwiched between. Trying to name a chord from its 'root' note is not going to help. Yes, it could be a B something, but ...


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Any will do actually. Unless you wanna use the relative minor of E major (C#m). Though if you wanna continue with E-E-E, then maybe SAT would be S= E E E, A= B G# B, T= same as A, but an octave lower. It might be hard to figure out though, since E major can't be found in an A minor scale. Are the 3 chords in the same measure?


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These are the 7 chords formed using the notes from the D major scale (D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#). So, yes, the answer is that the progression is in D major


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The shape you're using is a bit hard to transpose, because it uses the high E open.You'd have to really stretch your fingers to transpose it and I doubt you'd achieve it. I found some other shapes that are easier to transpose: You see here that you don't use any open strings, so you can easily transpose these shapes up and down, using notes on the E ...


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Well- all the answers to date contain factual information. But none tell the whole story and might over complicate the matter. The least you need to know is that the chord used as the basis for your question (D/A) is known in guitar chord notation parlance as a "slash chord". In simple terms, when a slash chord is used in guitar "notation" the author ...


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Directly addressing the exact chord: There are some, myself included that always play D/A when they see the D chord. Technically, a true root position D chord has D as the lowest note. Guitarists are limited somewhat in their voicings, and often play a non-root note in the bass for a chord that might not have the bass note indicated. A root position D chord ...


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Adding to Wheat's excellent answer, the note after the slash is indeed the bass note, put there to create an inversion of the prevailing chord, but mainly to make a bass line under the song. As such, if there is only a guitar (or maybe piano) playing, it makes sense for that instrument to play the inversion of the chord indicated. However, once the bassist ...


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The notation D/A refers to a D major chord with the note A in the bass. This is an example of a major chord in second inversion. The letter after the slash indicates a specific note, not the name of a chord, so your idea of "D/Am" would make no sense. Any triadic chord can be played with the root in the bass, the third in the bass, or the fifth in the bass. ...


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The old adage still applies, perhaps more than ever: you can't polish a turd. The reason why jazz musicians don't play pop songs is that unlike the blues and American Songbook, pop songs do not have well constructed melodies which naturally suggest sophisticated harmonies. Over the past 50 years I have written well over 1000 arrangements. Some of which I ...


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You can try 60 Top Hat Piano Grooves. It has 60 different grooves in all different styles including Jazz, Latin, pop and rock. You must be a pretty advanced player to play some of the grooves, it is all in music notation and explained using videos, very useful if you know how to read well.


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JUST with reference to Steve's post which is highly informative. A g2 chord would not contain the major third hence it would like G,A,D. THE G A B D CHORD is G add second or G add ninth, YOU don't need to worry about the octave the A is in; what determines its character as an add ninth is the fact that the dominant seventh has not been included. THE same is ...


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THE difference between 2nd and 9th or add ninth is not really the octave you play the extended notes in; the same with 4th and 11th. It is simply whether you include the dominant seventh or not. Generally speaking it makes sense to stack extended chords in their original positions but take the c9 chord-c e g bflat d. NOW try this inversion which is kinda a g ...


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just a suggestion; (1) If you are using the e-guitar with extremely hi-gain settings, then you should also logically use/practice power chord structures in this case, as using full or extended chords with this type of setting would only sound like mud (2) Use your acoustic or the e-guitar (with a classic rock / blues type of distortion) to practice the full ...


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sure there is. same way ya do it manually. relying on chords won't be as good as just using melody. due to the chords often being dom7 and that minor7 being out of keysig. kinda. take the melody, see where it's 7 most popular notes are, boom - there's your keysig usually. due to pop usually being in major, vocals and bass usually staying in keysig. ...


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I think you are on the right track, because you limit your question to a simple pop context. But, I would suggest this: Always keep in mind a song can modulate. The whole song may be in one key, but you might also need to apply some "local" key changes to sections of a song. Caveat: when pop styles use minor harmony there is a tendency for the music to ...


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I agree with the spirit of one of the other answers: you need to develop a good "ear" a good sense of pitch and harmony. @Rockin Cowboy's theory approach is extremely valuable. Learn that theory! But, also exercise your ear. Basic chord drills at the keyboard will help. Use a variety of patterns and make drilling in all keys an eventual goal. Try mixing ...


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will it switch like this (C Ionian -> C Mixolydian) or like this (C Ionian -> G Mixolydian)? Both; depends on what you want to do and where you want to go from the mode you are on. Let's look closely at these two examples. We are in C Ionian mode (C major); if you go to C Mixolydian, you'll find yourself in the V mode of the F Ionian mode. We are in C ...


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The notation builds up by intervals from the bass in close position (although you don't need to realise it in close position). For sevenths, you don't need all three intervals to specify: typically just the two most characteristic are used. In this case, you have an inversion of a minor seventh chord on ii that has a fifth and sixth from the bass in close ...


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The symbol is Roman numeral analysis with figured bass which is more than enough information to build the specific chord. It is telling you that the harmony at that point is a minor 7th (from the lower case of the roman numeral & the figured bass) built on the second scale degree (from the value of the Roman numeral) of Gb major (the note before the ...


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One of the other answers gives a mixture of traditional ornaments like trill and mordent along with "passing tones." It's a nice list, but "passing tones" are only one type of "non-chord tone" (NCT) and I think a fuller list of NCT's should be given: Passing Tones Neighbor Note Suspension Anticipation Appoggiatura Escape tone Cambiata (or changing tones) ...


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There are loads of tunes that do just this. The B7 either goes straight to a C, or goes 'round the houses' up in 4ths via E, to A, to dominant D, back home to G. Music tends to gravitate a semitone so going to C does just that. Or, it'll move in 4ths, as in the oft quoted ii-V-I in jazz. That B7 as suggested in another answer, will move to the relative ...


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You are just using the dominat chord of E minor which is the relative minor or V/vi if you were looking at it in Roman numeral analysis. When improvising you would most likely use a variant of the E harmonic minor scale. One you could use is B Phygian Dominant which is the 5th mode of the harmonic minor scale. These scales are very related to the G major ...


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Chords that include the tritone - in G7 that's the F and B - have a pull towards resolving the F to E and the B to C. Hence G7 as the "dominant 7th" of C major. Where there is no tritone, though there's always an overall pull towards "home", the tonic note/chord, it's less insistent. You needn't think of a maj7 chord "resolving", more of where ot might ...


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Some chord sequences to explore starting with Emaj7, these may help you to start to develop a vocabulary of sequences that work: Emaj7 - E6 - F#m7 - F#m+6 Emaj7 - F#m7 - G#m7 - F#m7 Emaj7 - Fdim - F#m7 - Gdim - E/G# - G#/F# - C#m/E Emaj7 - C#m7 - Amaj7 - E/G# - A/C# - B/D# - C#/F - Fdim - F#m7 Emaj7 - Amaj7 - B - C#m - A - B/F# - E Obviously this is not ...



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