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0

You asked for an easy way. Here's the easiest way: To determine what chords go with a scale, you can use a reference. Here's the best way: Learn what @Caleb has described. There are excellent, free lessons online at musictheory.net, which will spoon-feed you the necessary information. Start with the lesson on scales and work your way through intervals and ...


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I'm going to start with the very basics. Things can, of course, get more advanced than this, but its ultimately all based on what follows: Every note in the scale has a corresponding chord that can be built on it. The starting note is called the "root" of the chord. A chord is then built simply by "stacking" more notes on top of the root. Specifically, ...


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To determine chords to play from a major scale; take C Major Scale - C D E F G A B C Major Scale harmony (the chords): C major D minor E minor F major G major A minor B minor b5 You can apply the chord in the above order to all major scales.


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It is essentially an inversion of the C Major chord. In a major chord, there's the root (C), above that a major third (E), and then a minor third on top of that. (G) An inversion simply switches the order around, but you're still hearing the same notes. The first inversion has the root an octave higher than the rest of the chord. (E-G-C) (Forgive me if I'm ...


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There are a lot of opinions here justifying the keyboard layout in terms of being able to find notes by touch. Two remarks on that: for any serious kind of playing, there will be no time to grope around the keyboard. For another, things like chromatic button accordions don't offer any "find the diatonic scale" help. While some instruments use a different ...


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The white keys represent the diatonic scale (5 whole steps and 2 half steps) which Western Europeans inherited from the ancient Greeks. The Greater Perfect System encompasses the natural pitches we call A2 to A4, reflecting the range singable by male baritones and tenors. When these pitches were first given letter names in the 6th century CE, the lowest was ...


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Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and this site has, as a matter of policy, a prohibition against answers regarding specific copyright or legal matters. So I'll just tell you informally why I think this idea of yours would be a bad idea. All songs in the world written after about the year 1920 are subject to copyright. It is up to any individual copyright ...


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Here are some cases where slash chords might be used: Pedal point The most boring case. The bass holds (or repeats) a note while the harmonies change. Useful in everything from bagpipe drones to the codas of Bach organ fugues. Passing tones Sort the reverse of the above. The bass is moving around while the harmony is staying relatively static, leading to ...


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You can't really say it's "preferrable" in any particular circumstances, like you can't say it's preferrable to use a particular key – those are just musical decisions. You can compose songs without ever giving the bass a root note, though obviously it'll sound somewhat strange and lack familar resolution (but perhaps you want just that). Where inversions ...


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Not having heard the song, I guess it'll be a bass figure, running down from Eb on the IV to D on the Bb, to C on the Cm. If it had been recorded with 3 roots, playing this may sound odd. It's partly what we get used to hearing.


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The most common way to play "slash" chords (more properly known as chord inversions) is to take a major chord and play it over it's III or V. However any chord with a non-I note as its bass note would be consider an inversion. For example, the root note for the D major chord is the note D. So playing a D major chord with a root note that is anything but the ...


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In a minor key, you can use: i - bIII - bVII - IV. Since this is minor key, the flats are redundant, but I like to include them anyway, for clarity. Several songs use this progression, but one that comes to my mind is "Radioactive" by Imagine Dragons (Bm-D-A-E). I'm not at a keyboard, but I'd imagine the same progression would work reasonably well if you ...


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It's fairly 'in yer face', and works best in blues and soul. Think 'Knock on Wood', often used between I and IV.Good as a turnaround , I-bIII- II- bII -I, first four in the last bar of sequence. You say 'I can use'. You can use anything you like in your songs - they don't have to obey any rules or theory. They may well do, but they don't have to. If it ...


2

To add tension... Very [very] simple example... F, G, C or instead F, G/F, C Gives the 'trad' IV, V 7th, I but puts the tension in the bass.


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Slash chords have been around a while, and seem to have two interpretations. On one instrument - guitar, mainly, but also piano, the note after the slash says what the bottom note of that chord should be. If there's a bass player present, then that's what he'll play, and it doesn't matter much what the rest of the band do. Lots of music does not always use ...


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Playing a G#7 or a G#+6 is not really supposed to be in the G major scale/key. The chord is made up from G#, B#, D# and F#. The triad is standard, but the extra note, if the chord is called +6, will be Ex (E##). If it's called dom. 7th, that note becomes F# (as in Fx flattened). The B# of course being a C note on most instruments. Tritone substitution works ...


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As others have mentioned, there are various different inversions for the chord C major: C E G, E G C, G C E. They are the same chord because they contain the same notes. With this set of notes it turns out that C is the best note to pick as the root note. We then have a G which is separated from it by a perfect 5th (C-G,7 semitones.) The perfect 5th ...


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Because they sound similar! C4-E4-G4 sounds similar to E4-G4-C5 because when you press C4 you get a lot of different frequencies (harmonics), most notably a large amount of C5 and some C6 too. Therefore inverting the chord doesn't alter the total sound very much. The sound of C5 was already there when you pressed C4. (disclaimer: I'm a 100% layman, so this ...


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It is only the root that makes the difference. Just play any inversion of C6 (including A-C-E-G) and play a low C below the 4 notes. In all cases it will sound like a C6 chord, i.e. with a major quality. The same is true for Am7. If you play the inversion C-E-G-A (i.e. actually C6) but with an additional low A in the bass, it will sound like a minor 7 chord. ...


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Chords are built up from their root - the clue's in the name. Thus C6 nominally has a C as its starting note, Am7 has an A. Of course, with 4 notes, there will be 4 different closed versions to play, and humans have a tendency to hear the highest and lowest notes more easily when there are several played. In root position, C6 has C at the bottom, and this ...


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C Major (C-E-G) doesn't have much "contradiction". The least consonant interval, in any inversion, is a minor 3rd; a more consonant, familiar, and compatible interval (III, IV, or V) will always be present and is perceived most strongly. On the other hand, the VII interval is extremely dissonant and stands out. At a 15:8 frequency ratio, it's very ...


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You're right that changing the order of notes affects the chord. No matter how you arrange the notes C, E and G in a chord, it is still a C major chord, but there are other characteristics of the chord that are affected, and it will have a somewhat different sound. First, a chord can be arranged in different inversions. You can spell a a C major triad C E G ...


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Here is a different take on the theme: let's find a nice common divisor of the given frequencies for pure intervals. C E G -> 1:1 5:4 3:2 -> common divisor is 1:4 corresponding to C 2 octaves lower G C E -> 1:1 4:3 5:3 -> common divisor is 1:3 corresponding to C 1½ octaves lower E G C -> 1:1 6:5 8:5 -> common divisor is 1:5 corresponding to C 2⅓ octaves ...


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I can give you the short answer: The chords are based on scale degrees. If you look at the C Major scale you get: C D E F G A B C The major chord takes the root, the major third, and the fifth, or the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes from the above scale: C E G Once you have the chord, you can make inversions. This is helpful to change the sound of it slightly, ...


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If you look at the definition of a chord closely, you will see why they are the same. Let's look at the definition given by Wikipedia: A chord, in music, is any harmonic set of three or more notes that is heard as if sounding simultaneously. The key word there is set. A set in a mathematical sense is a special type of group where order doesn't matter ...


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E flat major. That is the key that the passage resolves to, as you can hear by playing an E flat major chord after the B flat chord. If you follow the B flat with any of the other chords, the passage is left sounding unresolved. Hence, the chord progression is ii,flattened VII, I, V


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I would call it a parallel modulation, since you're modulating to a parallel key. Googling for that term confirmed that this is what they are called, and led me to this video:


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Hardly a modulation, as it goes to major on the last bar, but a piece that's in minor for its entirety but finishes with a tonic major. That's called a Tierce de Picardie. The 'Picardy third'. In the dim and distant past, a lot of serious music used this as an ending, somewhat brightening things up. Going from major to minor is, I think a lot less common.A ...


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It is unlikely that this is Ab major because the progression doesn't have an Ab major in it and also doesn't typically have a Bb chord. If it has a Bb chord it is usually followed by a Eb chord. I see it as a progression in F minor as a i VI VII IV. The IV is technically not from F minor, but could have easily been taken from the relative major. Another ...


1

This is pretty common. You will see that you are playing in a lot of minor scales/modes where the V should be a minor chord, like in your example, but it will be a dominant chord, like in your example. This is derived from the major scale with the same name. So, if we are in the F Dorian mode, you can play a chord from the F major scale. The C7 is the V ...


0

F Dorian comes from the Eb major scale - it's the second mode. So it'll contain F, G, Ab, Bb, C, D, and Eb. So, those notes work well over Fm7 and Bb7, in fact they are the main chords F Dorian would have underneath. The C7 chord would share the C, G and Bb, but as you state, the E would clash with the Eb present in the scale. Often, particularly in Blues, ...


1

You can do whatever you want, which is the beauty of Jazz. It's more a matter of whether other people will still call what you're doing Jazz. I've implied a flat 9 (which I generally consider an energized root rather than a lowered second) in a piece with a simple, whole-note melody within Db maj of Db-C-D-Db. This works to my ear (and is followed by G ...


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You are right that in principle there's no difference other than that a polychord has two complete triads, which is of course not necessary for a general extended chord. Obviously, polychords are related to upper structure triads. I would say that polychords are a special case of extended chords which contain two complete triads. The main advantage is a ...


4

The polychords use a fraction for a symbol, like: , so as to distinguish from the slash chords. From what I have understood, the point of the polychords is to help the player read and play faster. It is easier to read Abm (fraction) G7 rather than G7b9b13. The following chord can be called both G7b9b13, and Abm (fraction) G7b9b13. (I know that someone ...


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Here's another idea, bizarre even by my standards. For those not familiar w/ the 12-tone composition rule (as originally stated; probably changed many times), it says you cannot repeat any tone until the other 11 have been played. Serially or in chords is allowed. So here's the "12-tone pi" composition rule: For each digit of pi, you're allowed to ...


0

The interval just refers to the distance between two notes. This is the same irregardless of what key you may be in. C - E is a Major Third in a minor as well as C major. You have there a list of chords and what type they are. This is not the same as the Key signature.


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If you want to make a nice piece of music (which I presume you do, simply encoding pi would seem a bit wasteful), I'd avoid trying to generate the music mechanically, and instead use pieces of pi as inspiration. For instance: Writing it in 22/7 (an approximation of pi) Using the first 5 or so digits as a motif in some way, and using the others not as ...


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The Cø7 is also known as Cmin7b5, spelled 1-b3-b5-b7. The C°7 is spelled 1-b3-b5-bb7. While the dim triad and min7b5 may be found in the major, natural minor, and melodic minor scales, the °7 is derived from the seventh mode of the harmonic minor scale. You may frequently find the ø in jazz tunes, however the °7 is less common because it is loaded with ...


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A half-diminished chord has a root, minor 3rd, diminished 5th and a minor 7th (eg. A C Eb G). The minor 7th is implicit in a half-diminished chord. So it is not necessary to include the 7 after the half-diminished sign (ø). And so, yes, both notations will refer to the same chord. In other words if a chord is named, for example, Cø7, the 7 is redundant. A ...


1

There are three types of diminished chords, Cø and Cø7 are the same. Some people just notate the chords slightly differently because how they learned the chords. A diminished triad is denoted with just a °, i.e. C°, and it contains a root, a minor third and a diminished 5th. A half diminished seventh is denoted with a ø and it is also common to see a ø7 ...


1

There's no reason you have to stay within one octave. You can use, for instance, C-D-E-F-G-A-B-c-d-e for your digits. So the first five notes are E-C-F-C-G-d, for example This has the advantage of being extremely intuitive to any musician, since you'd just be referring to scale degrees in C major (with 10 being 0). I can personally just sit there and read ...


6

Pi can also be expressed through various infinite series. I like François Viète series discovered in 1593: Square root from 2 is half octave distance. Maybe it is possible to represent the series as some sequence of sounds? Or maybe some other series would fit better? This might reproduce the spirit of Pi even better than replaying its decimal ...


1

Other answers have suggested using different bases. For an event in the Physics department, I did play pi in quintal, and there is a video. The sheet was generated using a script and Lilypond. Bonus: also in octal, but this one is not annotated.


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Why use base 10? You have to make some compromise somewhere, and since π is already transcendental, there is no rational radix that will accurately represent π. If you use heptary, π ≈ 3.0663651432036134110263402244652226643520650240155443215426431025161154565220002622436103301443233631. These digits map perfectly to the seven pitches in an octave. Using ...


1

As a programmer, I love this idea and of course I thought about this as well already but didn't have any time yet to try this out :). Basically, I believe your line with notes is incorrect. You should start by choosing a key in which you want to write it. I believe your key would be Am, or is it a coincidence? I would work with something like this: ...


4

One Idea I haven't seen mentioned is rhythm. Perhaps you can use some of the spare digits as a change in pace (f.e. switch from eights to quavers). Or you could map the spare digits to pre-conceived rhythmic motives. Another idea would be to use the digits that are not mapped to a note to switch instrument. HTH.


2

An option which no one has really mentioned is to use those extra digits for special purposes (ie Change tempo, another instrument). If the primary instrument is a piano, I'd imagine that simply assigning a digit to the snare, bass and cymbal would add a lot of flair to your final music. In fact, adding new instruments will open you up to a bunch of new ...


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One option if you're primarily interested in representing the individual digits of pi is to use a representation in a base other than 10. For example pi base 12 would have an individual digital for each chromatic note. Here's a website that might help get you started: http://www.virtuescience.com/pi-in-other-bases.html


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The number 10 doesn't necessarily map well to values in traditional musical theory. (For instance, there are 12 chromatic pitches per octave, using conventional divisions of the octave; diatonic scales have seven pitches; note durations are related as powers or negative powers of 2). So, for this reason, the world is your oyster! I guess you can choose any ...


1

Simple explanation: If you have the C major scale: C D E F G A B If you would want to create a chord (let's say E). You would have to use the notes from this C major scale (while playing in C). As normally, a E chord has the notes E G# and B (triad). Since we don't have a G# in our C major scale (and we are playing in C!), we need to swap the G# for a G. ...



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