Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I've been playing guitar for about 7 years now and I also had difficulties with memorizing chord patterns in the beginning. What I discovered after a while is, that every song has his own movement. When playing a chord, you have to imagine your hand as a single "position" on the guitar neck. I will use the famous chord progression of "Wonderwall" by Oasis: ...


1

Something which may help is training the process of memorising the chord progressions, for instance you play along with the sheet music or chord chart a few times for just the verse and then look away from the chords and play from memory. Repeat this with each part of the song (verse, chorus bridge etc) Wait a few minutes and then try again. By repeating ...


2

Caleb Hines' answer is very spot on. It all comes down to ear training. You're also gonna have to identify chords by ear i.e., know when a chord is a minor, a major, and any other voicings. I say this because it's going to be useful in identifying whether a specific chord is a 'I' or a 'II' etc in relation to the song. Interestingly, in my experience I ...


1

It depends entirely on the genre, and that is actually one of the defining characteristics of genre. most pop: probably, and mostly. Sometimes augmented by the occasional secondary dominant. Part of why they are so "easy to hear". But if it's torch-songy pop, probably not because they borrow a lot from the style of standards musical theatre or standards or ...


4

If I understand correctly, you find it easy to remember individual melodic lines (monophony), but have trouble remembering chord progressions (polyphony). I'm going to guess that this problem is related to ear training. You can mentally "hear" a monophonic line, and even mentally "sing" it, which allows you to remember intuitively how it goes. You can then ...


1

If your guitar has a fat/wide neck, you can try to position your thumb parallel to where your index finger is when barring. Make sure it's flat against the neck, with mostly the force on the joint of your thumb. You can also try changing to lighter string gauges and making sure your guitar has proper setup and action.


0

It's hard to hear it in songs like this, but pay attention to the bass. Also the A notes are usually falling to Ab (to form b9 chords) The true chords are probably close to: Dm9 G13 G7b9 CM9 Am11 Am7 Dm7 G11 G7b9 C6 A7 As for the 11/13 chords, they just come from delaying the transition of the top half of the chord. An easy trick to add interest to ...


1

Write the song with the melody BEFORE you worry about what key it's in. I think you'll only limit yourself (box yourself in) if you try to choose a key first (since it sounds like you've mostly learned by ear up to this point, anyways.) Make the song/tune/piece sound good to you first and then you can figure out what key it's in. I've played with some ...


1

Honestly, it could fit in several different keys, including C major, C minor, G major. There's not enough data here to tell for sure. At least one of the chords must be borrowed, though, since there is no single key that contains the E natural (in Am and C) and the E flat (in Cm). In order to define a key, you really need a cadence: a dominant-tonic ...


3

Far more often than not, the first full bar of a song contains the key chord. This 'sets the scene' for the listener. and establishes 'home'. In this case, it COULD be in C minor, which then brings the Am into question. This is explained away with the idea of 'parallel key', which gives another set of harmonies to use. As in not only the Cm set - Cm, Fm, ...


4

What I think fits perfectly here is that you are on the G major scale and you borrow a chord from the G minor scale. The chords G major and A minor fit perfectly with the scale and C minor is the 4th chord from the G minor scale. You are allowed to do that and it sound pretty good; it is also pretty common. Here is an example where Elvis uses it: ...


1

There's nothing wrong with barring all the strings on an A shape chord. In fact, there's nothing wrong with playing all six strings. It just gives the 2nd inversion of the chord, which can sound just as good in some songs. You could consider playing strings 2,3 and 4 in different ways. The most common is with 3 fingers, obviously middle, ring and pinky. ...


3

This is described somewhat in the answers here: Scale degree naming Basically, scale degrees are typically numbered according to the (parallel) major key, even if you're actually playing in a minor key, or some other mode. Thus in your case, A major would have a G# and an F#, so the bVII and bVI tells us that they have to be lowered (the sharps removed). ...


0

if you want a general method you can apply behind all the theory this chart works for you.Just choose any chords you want and use them accordingly.


1

E7 is the Dominant of A minor. E major is almost correct but, you are missing the minor 7. The major third and the minor 7 of every dominant chord make the interval of a tritone.


0

You could also try just playing the e power chord at the 12th fret. It has all the notes of an E Major chord (Except for the third.)


1

The notes of the dominant chord of a minor is E/G#/B. E - G# is a Major third while E - B is a perfect fifth. This makes the chord Major. I think you are getting confused by what it means for a scale to minor / Major and what it means for a chord to minor / Major. A Major Chord is one with a Major third and a perfect fifth. This can happen in both minor ...


5

The point of any dominant chord is to lead back to the tonic chord. The best way to do this is by using the leading tone (Natural 7th in major, raised 7th in minor). Because of how the natural minor scale is formulated, the leading tone is omitted from the scale. This however does not change the fact that the leading tone gives a very strong pull to the ...


1

It's probably more often the V because it has that G#. That comes from both the harmonic and the melodic minors. Sometimes Eminor is the V and it is used in lots of songs.Yes, it originates from the natural minor (or in some cases the melodic). It isn't so decisive, but still pushes towards I, which is the job of any V chord.


4

When people refer to a “minor scale”, they don’t always think of the natural minor scale. Quite often, they think of the harmonic minor scale, which is similar to the natural scale with the seventh degree raised by a semitone. As the seventh degree is the third of the dominant chord, the dominant chord is major in harmonic minor scales. For example, the A ...


9

Yes it is the dominant chord. The third is sharpened to G# to make a major chord, which gives a stronger cadence when moving V-i. This is why the Harmonic Minor has a sharpened seventh degree, to create the sharpened third in the dominant chord (or leading note in the scale, whichever way you want to think about it). In common-practice harmony, the strong, ...


5

It is correct to a certain extent. You are absolutely right that the 'natural' A minor scale has no sharps in it, and the v chord would be an E minor. However, minor scales come in several 'flavors'. There is the natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor. The harmonic minor is the same as the minor scale with the 7th raised by a semi-tone. Ergo, ...


0

the first thing to do would be to know your notes, what key they are playing. this will shorten the list of possible chords to search for. second,figure out notes from one phase, write the notes down and see what chords does these notes form in your key then try to play the chord over the song to see if it match. most of the times, you will find that there ...


2

On an electric or cutaway-acoustic this can actually be done in the obvious way. Without a cutaway, there's two things you can do, if you actually want to preserve that specific chord's sound, rather than just its harmonic function as the other answers instruct: Omit some notes. Crucial is to know which ones are really needed urgently. In your case: The ...


1

Don't bother playing this chord because John Frusciante doesn't play it either. In this part he sometimes plays x 9 9 9 7 x and other times he plays x 9 9 9 11 x


0

The chord you are trying to play is an E major and can be played barred on the 7th fret as follows: 7 9 9 9 7 7


1

In addition to jadarnel27's excellent answer, I think it's worth discussing diatonic intervals. A diatonic internal is one that is composed entirely of notes in a scale. For example, in the key of C, a C major chord is made of the notes C E G. The interval between C and E is a major this. A d minor chord is spelled D F A and has a minor third between the D ...


0

The chords you are talking about are called "diatonic" chords: chords whose tones are taken from the scale. If your scale has 7 tones, then you can make at least 7 diatonic chords (depending on how many tones you stack on each chord, or whether you use thirds or fourths to create your chords). The two kinds of scales that "diatonic" is most often used with ...


0

This passage is actually based on just 3 chords: C, D, and B. The only complicating factors are that (1) the melody has a lot of non-chord notes, and (2) there is a bit of the vocal harmony trick of accompanying the melody at the third below. Thus in the second chord, we have melody on F#, bass on D, inner voice still holding C as the root, creating what ...


0

here is a good test for the correct size guitar,hold down a barre chord F on the first fret and extend the little finger to the 5th fret and pluck each string to see how clear it is ...if you can reach the 5th fret comfortably that's fine....if the notes individually are not clear,but you can reach the 5th fret,then that is ok,you just need to practise on ...


0

A new app released today might be a sultion. http://audiokit.io/ I dont have iOS device to check the accuracy though. Will borrow one.


2

Most songs are built within a key, however it is not uncommon to have chords outside the key in a song. There are several ways to incorporate chords outside the key including: secondary dominants Substitutions Borrowing Chromatic With all the above examples you are still in the key you started in, just the harmony is temporarily not reflecting the key. ...


0

First figure out all the notes in the section and what chords/riffs are played. Then find out where they fit best on your guitar so you can play them easily. Two players may play the same part using different chord shapes and note fingerings and still be playing the same notes. The exact shape/position doesn't matter as long as you are playing what you need ...


4

There is nothing really complicated about these chords. What I think is throwing you off is that some of the chords are missing 5ths and some notes are above the staff. Here is the basic analysis of the chords broken down by measure: C | D7 Em | Am7/G Em/B | F#m/A Gmaj7sus2/A | C/G D/F# | C | C5/G Em/B | F#/A Gmaj7sus2/A | C/G ...


15

Is this handwritten or printed? Is the notation of German origin? In German, the notes E flat and A flat are called Es and As.


4

Could it maybe be German (or Dutch)? Because in this case it would mean Eb and Ab (i.e. E flat and A flat). And in this case 'Es' would refer to an Eb major triad, and 'As' refers to an Ab major triad.


6

After doing a little bit of digging, I found a source* that uses the s instead of the full sus symbol to notate a suspended chord. They always put the number next to it, but a sus alone indicates a sus4 so I would imagine that they would be equivalent. I would still like to see the context just to be sure but I think it is pretty likely. * I don't really ...


7

I agree that it's probably a sus4 chord, but if it's hand-written, could the "s" possibly be a "5" and it's a power chord? Only other kind of far-out thought...


0

Your first lesson sounds good - people need to know their way around a chord. Chords-wise : A lot of popular songs are in C/F /G etc but on guitar they're a bit of a finger-full on guitar. Maybe it's easier to teach E A and D which allows for loads of tunes and are probably easier to play. You could even start with 2-string power chords and build the rest ...


0

I would agree that working on repertoire from a very early stage is a good idea. Just make sure the songs you begin with are not too difficult as that may lead to frustration. Also basic strumming rhythms should be taught early on as well. Start with the simple first position chords C - A - E - G and D Major. Do Simple time signatures 3/4 and 4/4 are a good ...


2

When teaching students traditional guitar chords I would start with Em to Am. Students have issues starting on the C chord because of the stretch with the third finger on fifth string. Using Em with second and third fingers to Am, using same fingers and adding the first on the second string first fret, I see more success introducing chords. Use C Major ...


3

Instead of C/G/D I'd probably start them with Am7, Em, Em7 and CMaj7. They offer interesting sounding chords, are absolutely simple to play and in the case of Am7 and CMaj7, you can transition directly to C and show them the relationship and why one finger makes all the difference. Once they get C, transition to G and so on. If it were me, I'd also start ...


5

I think that starting with C and G chords is a throwback from other instruments, particularly the piano, so things could be learnt easily on the 'white keys'. There are none on a guitar, and initially sharps and flats don't need mentioning. Changing from C to G (and vice versa) involve a big change or finger/hand/arm movement with open chords. Not easy or ...


2

I had issues with the G chord as well. Training myself in classical style for discipline requires the pinky to hold down the high E string. Like you, I was either muting the A string with my ring finger or muting the high E string because my pinky wasn't pushed down hard enough. In observing very carefully what I was doing, I noticed that rather than ...



Top 50 recent answers are included