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1

Major and minor chords are both triads: a root note, a third, and a fifth. Major chords have a major third, four semitones above the root. Minor chords have a minor third, three semitones above the root. The fifth is usually a perfect fifth, seven semitones above the root. However, a minor chord may have a diminished fifth (only three semitones above the ...


2

A major chord is a triad of three notes: the root note, the major third, and the perfect fifth. For the B major chord, the notes are B, D♯, and F♯. Any combination of those three notes on your strings will form a B major chord. If the lowest note played is a B, the chord is in root position; otherwise, the chord is an inversion, which changes the character ...


0

The character of the 13th is essentially determined by its third and seventh voices. In the key of C, the Aeolian mode has a b13 (F). The chord would be a min11(b13). The Dorian mode has a natural 13, so the chord would be a min13. With html's superscripts, we can notate the chord and alterations appropriately. In fact, I have created summary harmonization ...


0

Most chords have a "key" feature that determines the character and musical function. For a 13th chord that's probably the diminished octave interval between the 7 and the 13. You'd also need the 3 to distinguish between major and minor. On the guitar, I'd typically play 1 7 11 13, which happens to fret pretty nicely too. So in C13 would be C Bb E A


3

Typesetters add modifying symbols such as stress marks, dots, staccato's etc. per voice or staff, not per system. So in your second example, the accent mark is only applying to the right hand octave.


2

Minor 6th chords use the major 6 interval off the root, just like major 6ths. The minor bit is the minor 3rd.A minor 6th chord with a minor 6th interval doesn't sound good. So 13ths will use the same 6th interval, but usually an octave higher.Strictly speaking, a 13th should have 1,3,5,7,9,11 and 13 in it, but that's often impractical - on guitar, for ...


0

I think it goes a bit stranger than a notion "of what chords you can use" and still be in a particular key, although of course that is an indicator. Eg Brown Sugar by the Rolling Stones starts in G. Then the main riff begins on a Cmaj .. next chord is an Ebmaj which doens't fit CMaj at all, and the sung notes are generally in line with a Cminor, yet I ...


2

A basic triad of Em uses E,G,and B.When E is the lowest, it's called a root position. When G is at the bottom, it's a first inversion and when the B is under E and G it's the second inversion. Most people would agree that with the root at the bottom, the chord sounds 'strongest'. Putting the 5 (B) under is probably the next usual voicing, and, specially ...


4

It is the correct tones for the chord. Having another degree than the tonic as root is called an inversion. Slash chords are generally for non-chord tones as bass, (or if a specific inversion is specifically needed for some reason). If it sounds good, I see no reason to not use this fingering. There might be reasons why it is not widely used, could be that ...


2

There are already a lot of answers that give you tips as to how to play a C6 on the guitar, and how to change between C and C6. However, I would like to point out one more important thing that many beginners do not realize: a C6 chord can always be replaced by a standard C chord. If you listen to the song then you'll realize that the melody implies a C6 at ...


7

You could play any number of different C6 chords: some using barres, some higher up the neck, chords with or without C in the bass and even chords that double an open string note. But practically, it makes sense to play the C6 shape that is closest to the common open C shape, as this is probably what you are most familiar with, and as it will be close to ...


-1

You could try an Am7 = from top .. E open B 1 G open D 2 A open E open Technically it's the same set of notes but a slightly funny inversion for a C6, as the "root" note (C) is quite high. I havent tried this in context - it might sound ok or might sound bizarre, but probably easy to play so would get you though the song :-)


2

Two ideas: use the 'A' shape barre on fret 3 for C, and drop pinky onto top string, 5th fret to produce C6. Or - Barre fret 8, use E shape chord, and drop pinky onto 2nd string, 10th fret for C6.There is another not so good version of C6 in that Am7 uses the same notes, and Am7 open is an easy chord to play. Trouble is,this change doesn't sound as good. Use ...


2

A pair of notes can belong to many chords. If we say that a pair of notes is a chord it allows the possibility that there may be a third, possibly unheard note that is the root note of the chord. And only the context reveals what that root note might be. For example, imagine hearing a car-horn sounding a minor 3rd. When I hear this I consider the two notes ...


1

As you say, there are innate intonation issues to consider when tuning a guitar. For this reason I don't rely on using chords with open strings to check tuning. I tune first with harmonics, often check the sound of the fourths between those strings tuned in fourths ("violin-tuning-style", if you like...) My final "check" is a series of octaves, each ...


2

That is a bit of a transition. What makes it a 6th chord is the added A. You could try a first position C chord (like the one in the song), but finger it with your pinky on the 3rd fret A string, third finger on D string E (2nd fret), middle finger for G string A (second fret), and B string C (first fret) with your index finger as usual. I.e. add 3rd string, ...


5

You say not to be consider intonation in this question, But to my mind they account for the defining factor in which check chord you should use. If intonation is disregarded then the tuning chord is redundant, because everything is perfect whatever chord you use. If you tune to an open E chord and then play an open D then the D will be slightly out of tune ...


12

I think you should always check with an open E chord AND an open C chord. This is because you have to find a compromise between the two. If the E is perfect then the C will be (slightly) wrong (the open G string will be flat); otherwise, if the C sounds good, then the third of E (g#) will sound sharp (even sharper than it should ...). If you have good ears, ...


0

On CDs that come with various magazines, it's always the open strings, one at a time, followed by an open Emaj. chord. Works as a quick check when playing with others, too.


3

I find context is everything with dyads. Within a progression, Db-C could function in a multitude ways. While it could function as a DbMaj7 sans the 3rd, it might also function as a C7(b9), F7b13, Bb-9, Gb7#11, Eb13, Ab11, F#7#11, A7#9, etc. With just two notes, the chords list can get just about endless (especially if you're willing to delve into ...


6

I would think the simplest test would be to play a quick G C D G in there open positions. It uses all the strings and it should be easy to tell if something is out because it is a simple I-IV-V-I progression that you should be tonally accustom to and be able to tell if a note if 'off'.


3

Using uppercase for the note names of all chords will yield a consistent appearance, which can be very important if a page has a lot of other text on it. The amount of visual processing can be minimized if major chords just use the latter, minor chords just use an "m", and major-minor seventh chords [sometimes called "dominant sevenths"] just use a "7". ...


6

None is more correct; but there are tactical reasons that certain types of players prefer certain formats. For example, jazz guys tend to like the following for major, minor, dominant seventh, and half-diminished qualities: A∆, A-, A7, Aø The reason is, aside from its popularity among the musicians they play with, that the shapes are easily ...


0

Also seen Ami in print.As jj says, certain printers prefer certain ways. A is obviously MAJOR, which sort of puts a as minor. Putting 'm' is an obvious one, and leaves the main letter capitalised, thus easier to read. I think the A- comes from the Nashville Number System (worth checking out ), but as soon as it's written in handwriting rather than printed, ...


0

The execution is instrument-dependent, the idea is two separate voices. You got the explanation for piano. If you take a cello and, uh, turn down the G string half a note or transpose the music up half a note, then you will indeed be playing the first note on two strings simultaneously. Now in this case, the obvious idea is to play the lower voice on the ...


10

Different notations have traditions of being used in different contexts. All of those are correct. I suspect the reason for such variety comes from use by non-academically trained musicians. Without formal, standardized training, musicians tend to come up with a shorthand that expresses what they want while being generally agreeable. Correlations may be ...


2

If a jazz pianist were to ask you the exact same question about classical music (in its broader sense), where would you start? I have taught jazz to many experienced and professional classical pianists, and I know of no shortcut to years of study and practice. If your question was intended to mean where could you start, I would recommend The Jazz Piano ...


0

There are so many chords that you can use in Jazz Music. Like Major7 (maj7/M7), Major9, Major11, even Diminished which have a form like 1-3-5-7 in maj7, 1-3-5-7-9 in maj9, or 1-b3-5-7 in min7. There are so many genres of jazz that have different chord to use. Like bossa-nova, they play basses just the 1st and 5th note. Swing, they do walking bass which a ...


0

From how I learned, most easy seems to remember that A three note major chord can be built on any piano key by pressing additionally a key three keys up and then another two keys more up. A three note minor chord can be built with the opposite rule (first two keys up, then three keys more up). You need to count both black and white keys. The keys that ...


1

your question is very verbose , but I think you need a chord dictionary. you can use this one.


2

This seems to me to be nothing like a reggae style song, just another pop song. The chords are standard majors and minors, not particularly played in any unusual way. Not sure whether the chords posted are accurate, as my sound is awful on this laptop. However, reggae chords per se do not exist. They are often played using a non-standard rhythmic pattern - ...


0

The chords, in all music styles, can be notated with letters, as in this case. The capital letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G denote the base of the chord. If this letter is appended with a lowercase "m", the chord is Minor; otherwise the chord is Major. I hope this helps.


2

Firstly, there is no such thing as 'reggae' chords, they play the same chords and voicings you'll find in any other pop genre... Maybe you are thinking of the Reggae idiom of playing staccato chords on the 'and'? 'Roar' plays staccato chords as steady eighth notes, something I've never heard in any reggae song and I've playing in two reggae bands... ...


1

Even if your interest may not be in classical music, you need to work on classical harmony, for it is the basis of any tonal music (jazz, etc, included). There are many books on classical harmony, but one I suggest you look at is Tchaikovsky's Guide to the Practical Study of Harmony, as it is short and well explained, and freely (and legally) available at ...


1

Since writing music is an art, there isn't a single answer to your question. The approaches that others have offered are sound. I myself have learned how to write chord progressions in a different way. What I've done is taught myself to improvise on the piano. I'm not particularly great at it, but what it lets me do is quickly try chord progressions and how ...


2

If this were my problem, and I was using an equal-tempered instrument like the piano to accompany Carnatic music, I'd keep it VERY simple. I would try to hear the final note (sa, I think it is called) of the rag and play that as an octave in the bass, then try to add very simple pitches over it, experimenting with the perfect fifth above sa, the perfect ...


3

The main reason you will not find this analysis/interpretation is that the N6 chord is a part of Functional Harmony, ie Major or Minor keys with Functional Dominant -> Tonic relationships. The N6 chord is part of the Classical world. You are trying to place a Functional Harmonic device in a Modal setting. While you may be able to make this work in a Modal ...


2

Interesting question. I'd say no. My argument is not very strong though because its not about the N2 chord itself but about the way it appears on stock progressions. Typically a Neapolitan (rather, Neapolitan sixth) chord is heard as a subdominant that progresses to the dominant or dominant 7 chord. If you'd be in locrian or phrygian, and you would make ...


1

Alterations are mostly used with dominant chords moving to a chord with a root a perfect fifth below their root, i.e. G7(alt) moving to Cm. You can use a dominant chord to approach any stable chord in your key (these dominant chords are called secondary dominants), but using them also means altering (at least) one scale tone. E.g., for the IV chord in C ...



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