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1

Way back. Do you need sources earlier than Bach? I suggest you are cautious about considering music as "evolving". The Blues uses dominant 7th shape chords in a non-functional way. I don't think it's particularly illuminating to trace them back to a Bach chorale harmonisation.


1

If you Google dominant seventh and ninth chords wikipedia gives a good overview of the early usage of those, i.e., they did appear in classical music. This wasn't obvious perhaps, since the classical composers used those chords as harmonic devices among many others, where their use in blues is pretty insistent. As far as harmonic forms, I believe harmonic ...


1

The simplest approach is to consider the tonality as G Mixolydian; here, Bb is simply an altered chord (the III borrowed from the minor).


0

A Bb chord is not in the scale of C major, but it's perfectly acceptable (common, even) to use it in a song in that key. It doesn't need any special justification, or to be "borrowed" from anywhere. It's just the chord on the b7th. Very commonplace.


1

There is often the facility in a song to use the PARALLEL KEY. For instance, in C maj., there's C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bo. In C min., there'll be Cm, Do, Eb, Fm, Gm, Ab, Bb. So any of this bank can and are used in a piece 'in C'. This then says that the piece in question could well be 'in C'. Thinking another way, with all but the G chord, it could be in F. ...


1

There is no key which contains both G major and Bb major. Because that would require both B and Bb notes. It could be voiced as an A#, to fit the standard rule that a scale has each lettered note name exactly once. The Chords describe these notes (although they may be 'spelled' differently, meaning Bb can be expressed as A#) G, A, Bb, B, C, D, F No ...


3

I would say it's a G mixolydian. I listened to the song, and the G and C both had strong tonality, although the G felt more like tonic, so it's the mode of C starting on G which would be mixolydian. The Bb chord is probably a result of the artist trying to give the song a minor feel, because it modulates to g minor, then promptly back into the G mixolydian. ...


2

Before I answer your question, I think it will be helpful to explain "harmony". The melody of the song is conveyed via single notes. We often refer to chords that are played with the melody notes as the "harmony" part of the song. Dictionary.com has the following for the definition of "harmony": the simultaneous combination of tones, especially when ...


2

Working from your example: C and F are both part of the F major chord, so you can hold one F major chord for both of those notes. G and D are both part of the G major chord, so you could just hold a G major chord for both notes. So you would have F major, then G major. Another way to do it: F and D are both part of a D minor chord, so you could hold D ...


3

It takes time to get the technique. The best tip I can give if you don't know this already is not to lay your index finger totally flat but to roll it round slightly so that it is the bony side, rather than the fleshy pad of the finger pressing down. For F shape barre chords there is trick for avoiding them altogether (Jimi Hendrix reportedly did this) - ...


2

If the strings buzz on the frets when you play the chord you should check a few things: Are you applying enough pressure on each string? Are you applying the pressure in the correct location? Is your finger pushing down straight? 1. As Tetsujin mentioned in his comment, you might not have the strength to push hard enough. This will come given enough ...


2

As you say, it's something that 'pads out' the mix to fill space. Often the word 'pad' is used when talking about synthesized sounds, and refers to how a specific sound 'sits in the mix'. So you wouldn't really say that 'organs are pads' in general, because there are a lot of different organ sounds, some of which are very cutting upfront sounds (hence not ...


3

My definition of a pad is something that is used to fill in the space of a piece usually with chords. This is pretty much spot on. Like the orchestra uses the string section to play chords, people use synth pads to fill in with chords. I'll borrow the wiki definition: A synth pad is a sustained chord or tone generated by a synthesizer, often ...


-1

Because it's 'in key' (no accidentals) when rooted on the dominant of the key..... ie. In the key of C (all white notes) G7 uses all white notes..... C7 and F7 both have the seventh as an accidental (black note in C). So to stay in key you have major sevenths built on the first and fouth chords (root and ...


2

I'd recommend taking a step-by-step approach: Figure out what the notes are. You can't know what chord it is without knowing what notes there are. From top to bottom, the notes are: G♯, E, C♯ (twice) Figure out what chord it is. You can't know what the chord inversion is without knowing what chord it is. There's only one way to arrange the ...


1

An inversion is just determined by what note of the chord is in the bass. Root position has the root in the bass, first inversion has the third in the bass, second has the fifth in the bass, and third has the 7th in the bass. Once you know what chord you are looking at, you know what the root, third, and fifth is. I'm not going to give you the answer to ...


2

In common practice four part harmony the bass note dictates the inversion. So, first identify the chord by the notes that make it: C#-E-G# --> that's C# min, or iii in A Maj. So C# is the root of this chord, and it's in the bass, so it's a root chord. If E was in the bass, it would be 1st inversion (C#6); if G# was in the bass it would be 2nd inversion ...


1

It's a matter of voicing: many chord changes happen by just changing few notes slightly. If there is a dedicated bass note keeping track of the respective root, it tends to jump around a lot, not maintaining a melodic line of its own. Omitting such a bass line makes the resulting changes more subtle and work on their own, like reciting a poem without ...


1

Depending on how much the audience is used to the type of music being played, it can "hear" the root although it's not there. As if the player was saying "I don't play the root D there, but you know what I mean". The context helps pretending the root was there. A bit like when someone is playing a very minimalistic version of a standard tune, if the ...


1

There are a number of cases where it's possible to think of chords from different perspectives. One example would be the way that a C major 6th chord and an A minor 7th chord have the same notes in, but in different contexts it might make more sense to think of the chord as one or the other. Another example would be when modulating, say using a common chord ...


4

First thing which comes to my mind is that you get a (rootless) D-9 when you play FM7, so you add color to your chord (the 9th). And if you play the root in the melody, you don't "lose" a voice by doubling a note. The second thing is that playing the rootless chords, especially when playing standards, change the feeling of the chord progression: playing ...


1

If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


1

Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


1

There are some common ones that will crop up again and again in almost all pop genres and I hear these in house quite a lot: (these are in Am or C for simplicity) C | G | Am | F Am | F | C | G C | G | Em | F F | G | Am | Am Am | C | Em | D By examination you can see the general theme is using C, Am, and F. 1, 3, 6 or 1, 4, 6 in the case of C progressions. ...


1

Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...


1

Well first of all, kudos to you for hearing the problem and wanting to improve. So the overall answer of course is the speed at which you change fingerings, and this is something that will improve naturally over time as long as you continue to HEAR the problem and focus on improving. But there are also techynical adjustments and tricks you can use. There are ...


3

It could be the set up of the guitar, but it could also be the fact that you let the pressure off the strings too slowly and for too long. This gives the sound of a well pressed down string a chance to buzz. Try to hold on to each note, or each note of a chord, until you're just ready to change to the next. Then get there as quickly as you can. It won't ...


1

Most often caused by fingers dragging across the the strings when changing chords. The solution? Practice, practice, practice. It takes a while to build up any muscle memory, and considering each chord shape is a muscle memory in its own right, it takes a lot of practicing to switch between your whole chord repertoire seamlessly.


6

All new strings need a good stretch to allow them to bed in. The metal itself has to stretch a little, the windings round the post have to settle and the neck has to re-adjust to the tension change. Along each string, pull and push, but not like you'd pull a bow (and arrow). Lift up and push down a couple of inches away from each other - it's not easy to ...


3

It's hard to be sure, but I believe the parentheses just indicate that the empty d string can be played at this point, but needn't. Note that d-string on 5th fret gives you the same note already; doubling it on the g-string will merely add some extra grit (but possibly the result will rather be muddy and undefined, due to extra empty-string vibrations).


0

I just wanted to add polychords fall into these same transposition answers that @awe, @slim, and @Tim succinctly provided. The usual dead giveaway of a polychord is the chord type specified in the notation (not just a bass note Bmin/E). The reason I bring this up is because the slash notation is used as well for them. For a polychord you actually are ...


0

To get an idea of what has been done in the past (and thus use as a model), the book by Goetschius: https://books.google.com/books?id=HV4QAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=free+pdf+goetschius+melody&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjK0ZHT7IfMAhXK7CYKHcjaCXkQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q&f=false is pretty good. It's a bit old-fashioned but discusses ...


1

You give us neither the G7 > C or E7 > Am cadences that would answer your question conclusively. Which way will you choose to end the piece of which this is an excerpt? Neither you or you friend is wrong, or right!


0

Nothing beats knowing what all the common chords sound like in the key you are playing. See link below. I would play all these chords in various inversions, and also see what they sound like if you omit a note. http://www.piano-keyboard-guide.com/key-of-c.html



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