New answers tagged

3

Since it's you and your fingers playing that guitar, then the choice must be yours. Recommendations are often made for which fingering, but it is down to personal choice. What works best for you, in other words. I'm assuming it's the open version, E3 A2 D0 G0 B0 e3. Other options include pressing a B3 instead of B0, and another consideration is where you ...


0

It's true that over a C chord, the main notes you'll sing are from that C chord (CEG), but other notes are bound to be in there somewhere. Otherwise it'll start to sound like arpeggio practice time. By main notes, I mean the ones that are more emphasised - often 1 and 3 in the bar. For example, if there were a D,E,F,and G as 4 crotchets in a particular bar, ...


2

Pitch matching and ear training is very useful for learning. One of the primary goals is simply to accustom your voice and your ear to a consistent set of pitches or intervals, enabling you to reproduce them with ease and recognize if you're singing off-key. Singing along with scales also helps with things like quick note transitions when doing runs of ...


0

On the staff, all the notes are written in a vertical line, with one stem. Just before them you need a wavy line, also vertical. It's called an arpeggiated or broken chord. Usually from low to high, but direction can be signified with an arrowhead.


0

Successive pitches do not follow a linear progression, they follow an exponential one. They are related by ratios, not addition and subtraction. Here is an explanation of piano key frequencies which follow an equal temperament tuning. Not sure why you are using Scilab for this. If you are into programming, you might want to check out something like Csound ...


0

There is a free external plugin called 'spicy guitar'.This should simulate an acoustic guitar sound just fine. But if you want something really pro, you want to use 'real guitar' vst by musiclab which costs $199. 'DSK electric guitar z' is a good free one for electric guitar or you can buy the ultimate NI 'guitar rig' for $180


0

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like you are playing chord-based, not notation-based, songs along with modern music ensembles. If this is the case, learn to substitute your left hand for your feet: instead of playing the root of the chord with a foot, you will need to play it as an octave with your left hand in the bass range of the piano. (Play the ...


1

Seeing as the vast majority of country music has the basic 1/4/5 chord progression, and no one is really questioning Brad Paisley's artistic integrity, I think you are OK. Also there are a fair number of jazz standards than many musicians play differently, even though they may all be built on the same harmonic structure. It is clear that this... ...


2

As you're trying to write six songs, it's probably no bad thing that they share some harmonic material, as it will help them sound like they belong together. Say songs 1 and 6 share a common chord sequence - the audience will get a satisfying feeling of closure because they're hearing material they heard earlier. If you think two of your songs sound much ...


1

I know your question has been answered well by Tim. Also what matters is the performance. People love a great performance and if you can do that your songs will be a success. If it pleases that is what counts. If you want to experiment you might try some chord substitutions such as tritone subs. I don't know your songs, but probably most important idea is ...


0

My guitar teacher taught me to practice fretting just the chords with the left hand and to not use the right hand for a few minutes. Just practice moving the left hand through your chord progression, over and over again. It helps build speed and muscle memory.


0

More about dexterity than strength. If you're focusing on hitting your strings hard, you can actually develop tendinitis really quickly. Instead, learn how to apply just enough pressure to get those notes out and then focus on moving quickly. It's actually much faster without all that pressure and much better for your arms.


0

You should try to juggle balls. Look at youtube, watch 2-3 videos "How-To", 5-15 min maximum. Nothing more. Each day, 15-30 minutes. And test yourself, how fast will you accomplish this task? For me, it was 10 days. What is it? Why I was so slow? Because it is speed of creation of connections between neurons inside spinal cord. It is kind of memory, called ...


0

You will have to do this bar-by bar, but it won't be as laborious as you might fear. No need to create the empty bars first. Open both scores alongside each other. System-select a bar from the second score. Ctrl-C to Copy it. Paste it into the appropriate position in the first score. As it's a System selection it will be inserted rather than replacing ...


3

The chord is actually a Csus2 which contains the notes C, D, and G or in intervals a root, Major 2nd, and Perfect 5th. C5/2 is an odd way to notate it that should not be used as it looks too much like a slash chord. It would look something like this on the staff: X: 1 M: 2/4 K: Cmaj L: 2/4 |[CDG]||


7

It's a bit of all sorts. Finger/hand strength and mobility are important, and will improve with more playing.Some new chords will require adaptations of existing fingerings, such as putting a pinky down as a changed note in a barre chord for a 6th or 7th. Thus, they're easy to learn. Sometimes, one finger needs to be flat across 2 or 3 strings, whilst the ...


0

All diatonic modes are the same scale starting on different notes. While you can think of different modes for each chord, I find that approach to be way too complicated for live performance. Moreover, that approach tends to lead to playing scales rather than creating interesting and catchy melodies. Take the chord tones for each bar as your "strong" notes ...


0

A melody is comprised of notes, usually from a particular key. Those notes could and often do, add up to the scale of that key, when put in order, with root first. Thus, in A, there'll be A,B,C#,D,E,F# and G#.So, a tune in A will use those notes in the main.Take any of those notes, and stack the next but one and the next but one to that, and maybe one more, ...


0

The symbol you refer to is a minor 7 flat 5 chord, also called half diminished. While reading music, or writing it, it is easier to read the symbol than the longer version which would be F#-7b5. This symbol also represents the sixth scale degree of the melodic minor scale.


0

Answer 1 - Definitely not! You don't need struggle with those chords I tough disable people (with no middle finger, as example) and a solution for that particular chord was using a bar, it means press all strings with one finger it seems difficult but it's an alternative Answer 2 - It should be a bunch of it but I don't know sorry, but I will explain why I ...


0

If you fretted the full barre version - E5,A7,D5,G5,B5,e5, then you could mute whatever you need, with a little practice. Or play the strings you want to with hybrid picking. In the barre version, there are 2 A, 2 E, a G and a C. If playing alone, an A,C and G are sufficient - in jazz the 3rd shows maj/min., while the 7th shows, well, the 7th! In an ensemble ...


1

That is totally a matter of style, given the combination you have there. If you wanted a Spanish guitar sound and kind of dark, use phrygian. If you want a jazzy/blues feeling, use Dorian. However, if you use Dorian with the minor chords toward the beginning of the progression, I would probably give Mixolydian a try on the major chord to maintain the bluesy ...


0

I learned to fret this quite effectively from Rick Peckham at Berklee Online in the Chords 101 class. Use the ring finger to barre the top strings, then wrap the middle finger on top of that to fret the sixth string. The fifth string and first string will be naturally muted. This is a much quicker and convenient fretting method. To answer your first ...


1

Both shapes you pictured are A - 7 chords. Also 6th string 5th fret, 5th string 3rd fret and 4th string 5th fret is form of A - 7. If you play the top four strings, 1,2,3,4 together leaving out the 6th string bass that is also a form of A - 7. Sometimes you don’t have to or want to play the full array of chords, just enough for the listener to get the ...


3

The heart of your question--"when should I use an eleventh chord, and when should I not?"--seems decent enough, but I'm not sure you're going about it the best way. You're looking for a simple dichotomy of "use it here and here, but never use it here!". But such a dichotomy will trivialize and oversimplify the music way too much. It reminds me of the age-...


2

In a word, dissonant. For me, the 11th chords were challenging to learn because most of them, starting with the I chord, are dissonant. However, if you press on, I suspect that you will make some more pleasant discoveries. In fact, the IImin11 leads off one of my favorite tritone subs on guitar (i.e, IImin11, bIIdom7#11, Imaj7). You will likely discover that ...


0

Most natural instruments will produce a tone which contains frequencies that are near-multiples of the tone; for some instruments such as the clarinet most such frequencies will be near odd multiples (3x, 5x, 7x, etc.) while other instruments will produce a mixture of even and odd multiples. For any two frequencies x and y which are present in a signal, ...


1

The question is not crystal clear to me. Do you mean 'does it HAVE to have a seventh in it', or 'why is the seventh actually not in the key'? Richard answered the first, but be aware that by calling a chord just a 9th will incorporate the flattened 7th and an ordinary 9th. As Richard stated, it's because it becomes the dominant chord in the key of its IV. ...


2

All 9th chords imply the inclusion of a flat seventh. This includes sharp and flat 9th chords (#9 and b9). However, there is a good reason why the 7 would usually be included in sharp and flat 9th chord names. It is because it may be unclear whether the sharp or flat symbol is "attached" to the 9 or the letter name of the chord. A couple of examples will ...


1

By default, any chord with an "extension" higher than 7 includes that lowered 7th. So C9, C11, and C13 all have a B-flat implied in the chord. It doesn't matter what the accidental is on the 9, 11, or 13, the 7 will always be b7. (Thus your first sentence is technically incorrect; the 7th is not the 7th degree of the C major scale, it's actually the lowered ...


0

To expand on Farbod's answer, chords sound consonant, when the overtones seem to belong in the same "class" of frequencies, most often harmonic or near-harmonic series, corresponding to periodic sounds we commonly hear, like human or other animal's voices. When you put those C1 & G1 bass notes together, they are approximately harmonically related (3/2 ...


1

The issue is not due only to equal temperament, which makes the fifths slightly smaller (so "dirtier") than they should be, but also due to inharmonicity. Inharmonicity means that, due to the nature of the strings, the harmonics deviate from their theoretical pitch. That means that, for lower notes, the high harmonics may be quite "out of tune" so to speak. ...


2

Dom's answer is 100% correct, but I wanted to offer something else that is a little too much for just a comment; it has to do with some important musical terminology, especially between "scale"/"chord" and "tonic"/"root." (And I apologize if this is due to a language issue; as someone currently living in a foreign country, I certainly don't mean to make fun!)...


6

Yes it is a minor chord. The type of scale does not matter nor does the type of chord you can build off the tonic. Only the notes used to make the chord matter. A major chord will always consist of a root, major 3rd, and perfect 5th and a minor chord will always consist of a root, minor 3rd, and perfect 5th.


-1

There's no "correct" way to exactly name this chord using the standard nomenclature.


0

Given the notes C G A Bb, I would think of it as a Gmadd2 (no5)/C or taking the notes in the order which would come from C13 removing the third, ninth, and eleventh [C G Bb A] I would think of it as a Gm add9 (no 5)/C.


2

The reason the first section sounds dissonant is because the perfect fifth is very low, and so this may sound dissonant even though it is not. You can hear a similar (or possibly increased) effect if you have a major third instead of your perfect fifth at a similar pitch, because the notes will be closer together at the low pitch. In the second section, it ...


1

Harmony in general is a pretty broad topic and there isn't just one option for how to do harmony. In general, harmony is the simultaneous or "vertical" relation between what is being played. There is the typical Western idea of functional harmony where the Tonic-Dominant relationship (I-V) drives the progressions we encounter, but there is a lot more out ...


0

Let's take a step back and just get a grasp of what is being shown here. The notes on the staff represent the melody and the Roman numerals represent the harmony. The Roman Numeral in the harmony is valid until another Roman Numeral replaces it so yes the harmony is an I which is an F major chord throughout the first measure. The melody and the harmony are ...


1

When you write the roman numeral denomination of the chords, you are implying that the notes that make up each chord are present, although not explicitly written in the score. So "I" in your example means that the notes F-A-C would be in some fashion played in an improvised manner by a performer or arranged or orchestrated by the composer for the orchestra ...



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