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That's how I was taught chords as a child. I did allow me to progress more rapidly and I learned how to play pop songs and accompany singers fairly quickly. However, I'm now struggling to learn the more complex/alternate fingerings as reflected in my question here: Tricks to unlearn chords learned by shape on the piano It all depends on how far you want to ...


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Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


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A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...


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C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


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A good example of the G/B chord which illustrates why it matters which note is in the bass is the main progression/riff from "Blue on Black" by Kenny Wayne Shepherd. The riff starts on a D chord with the bass note moving briefly down to C and then back to D. The next chord is introduced by a "walk" up the A string, playing the notes A, B, C to finally form ...


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In rock music it is not uncommon for the root notes of chords to follow a scale, while the chords all are major chords (or distorted fifths, i.e. power chords which have an overtone series much like a major triad). Therefore it can be more meaningful to analyze the harmony of a rock song by considering what scale/mode the root motion implicates. Many of the ...


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you need to learn to sightread and know where you are on the keyboard as preliminary you need to know your scales and build your chords off that then practice root position, first inversion, second inversion, (+ further inversions) using hand over hand technique when doing the D7, know that you can always omit the 5th if you'd like. Some do, dome don't ...


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Adding further to the two existing answers, the notes of MODES will fit slightly better than the notes of each major scale. On chord G, obviously, the G scale notes fit best. Still in the KEY of G, but on a D chord, the notes of D Mixolydian are a (slightly) better fit, and on a C chord, the notes from C Lydian likewise. So, what's happening is that on ...


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I stand with Shevliaskovic on this: You can indeed do what ever you want. Taking your question as written, that is the exact correct response. However, I believe that this is what you really wanted to know: It is true that G Major key has a D Major chord as the dominant (fifth chord of the key), and that D Major key has G Major chord as the sub-dominant ...


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I agree with the plus-voted answers above, but I'd like to suggest a couple of additional techniques. First, simplify your chord voicings. Start with "shell" or "Bud Powell" chord voicings. Then add color notes: flatted fifths, 11ths, 13ths, etc. Honestly, this is what most jazz piano players do. George Shearing the Block Chord King is dead. Second, try ...


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First of all, since this is your composition, you can do whatever you want. Unless you're going for something very specific, like you want to write your song in a certain style, there are no limits. Go nuts. In your example, I assume you're in the G major key, and you have a D major chord, right? If this is the case, then yes you can freely use the D ...


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Simply put you analyze the score. You need some rudimentary knowledge of non chord notes and the like. Let me give you an example to aid your comprehension. This is an excerpt from the piano piece La Romanesca by Franz Liszt. They key is a minor. In the first bar we have the melody in the right hand and the harmony in the left. The left hand jumps from A ...


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What's to "approach"? Those are the chords. They don't fit any neat system of all being in one scale. It would be ridiculous to invent constant modulations. Lots of music does this. If your system of theory doesn't "allow" it, find a better system!


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First of all, you need to find what scale the song is in (if any). This will be determined by the key signature and if it's a minor scale, there might be some accidentals. After you've found out what scale you are in, you need to see what notes are being played and make out which chord they form. For instance, you might see that the notes being played are ...


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I still think the best way to memorize chords is by their sound. To do this you would first need to be familiar with the pitch of every key on the keyboard and their relative pitches. This might seem really basic but is very important, and also fairly easy to accomplish on the keyboard because there are really just 12 keys repeating themselves. Then try to ...


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I play the bass guitar, but I learned this way of practicing seventh chords and inversions from a saxophone player. Say I am working C Maj 7... I start at the bottom of my instrument and head towards the top of the range: up CEGBC, down ECBGE, up GECBG, down BGECB. Once I reach the top, I come back down again alternating up and down. I do this for each ...


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What do you mean by "wrong"? When transcribing music for the piano, the goal is to be faithful to the original while ensuring that the transcription is playable and "pianistic", which is a term-of-art that is not very easily definable. It sounds like you're asking about the rules of traditional Bach-style four-part-harmony. (Or really n-part harmony, where ...


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This is a kind of synesthesia, defined by M-W as a concomitant sensation; especially: a subjective sensation or image of a sense (as of color) other than the one (as of sound) being stimulated According to the American Synesthesia Association, there are more than 60 permutations of synesthesia; it is estimated that around 4% of us have it in some ...


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I don't know of any clear-cut fully worked out published approach, but there is a lot of research out there. Here are some pointers. David Temperley's is a leading researched in this field and his paper An Algorithm for Harmonic Analysis his the most in depth approach I've seen so far (although very heavy on the music theory side). His book The Cognition of ...


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In popular music, the most common chord positions are the root and the second inversion. First-inversion chords tend to sound rhythmically "weak". In any case, doubling the third of a major chord between the bass and treble is probably not a good idea, unless you really want that sound for some reason. Try it, and some alternatives, and use your ears! If ...


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Write your bass line. Then fit harmony notes in as they will. It's quite unlikely that both melody and bass will take the third of a major chord. It's also unlikely that block chords in the piano left hand will sound good. They tend to sound muddy.


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For chords at the end of the piece (or really important sectional endings) a root position chord is often best. Other places, the choice of root or first inversion should be (at least in my opinion) which one makes the bass line sound best (in the composer's opinion.) Usually (at least in chorale style with 3 or 4 voices) one prefers not to double thirds of ...


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It is not necessary to double the root when converting guitar chords to piano chords but it could be done if fits better with the music. But there are important distinctions between the guitar and piano that come into play when considering how to notate chords on sheet music. These distinctions center around (and are affected by) the way chords are played ...


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A pianist is very unlikely to want a literal transcription of what a guitarist does. Anyway, guitarists don't spend all their time strumming 6-string chords! The only answer to this is - it depends. The pianist may be playing one, two...up to six notes in the right hand, a bass line in the left. Or he may be playing a melody in the right hand, chords in ...


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If you play CEGC, it won't be parallel eighths. It will simply have the octave doubled. In order to have parallel eighths, you have to have the voices move. If you take guitar chords and put them into sheet music for piano, should you double the root ? There isn't any definite answer here. You certainly have to option to easily double the root (C). So, ...


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The intervals might be the same, but they start off from a different frequency. You can see here the different frequencies for the notes. For instance, the C major that starts from C1 will have these frequencies: C1: 32.70 E1: 41.20 G1: 49.00 And similarly, for the first three tones of F major from F1: F1: 43.65 A1: 55.00 C2: 65.41 You see that ...


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I have the same problem. In Fernando Sor's study in Em (Op. 35, No. 24), the tempo is quarter note=88, and the passage is as follows (the b-chord is in the second measure): If I place the d#, b, and f# fingers first, I can add the b note. But since the b note is played first, and the tempo is 88, I place the b no problem, but I can never nail the other ...


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Hi the issue with the original question is that when forming the standard triad one uses the 1,3,5 fingers on the right hand and 5,3,1 on the left hand. However when forming sevenths one brings in the second finger on both hands. 1,2,3,4 on the right and 5,4,3,2 on the left. This gives the dominant seventh of F as C-1,E-2,G-3 and Bb-4 with the 5 of the right ...


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To play Mr. Bojangles on guitar in first position (open strings), you'd play the famous chord progression notated "C G/B Am" with bass notes C, B, A. For 'best' voicing, you wouldn't play any of the notes available to you on the 6th string, although each chord triad has at least one reachable note. If you are the rhythm guitarist playing in a band with a ...


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This would better described as tone tripling than as chord since the question is dealing with notes separated by an interval of one octave and each note is basically twice as fast as the previous in frequency. The Harvard Brief Dictionary of Music states "... the octave is the most perfect consonance, so perfect indeed that it give the impression of being a ...


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We wouldn't refer to this as a chord. The idea is that you need three unique notes, which would not include octaves. Some definitions of a chord will allow just two notes but the more commonly accepted definition calls for three. You could, however, imply a chord with octaves alone, which requires context. For example, if you have established a key by ...


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A chord is defined as a set of pitches. If you are really into semantics you could argue that the notes C4, C5 and C6 meet that requirement and could be considered a chord, but to most people it would not be a chord. There are two big reasons for this. The first is whenever someone looks to define a chord, they look at the collection of pitches by the ...


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Way back. Do you need sources earlier than Bach? I suggest you are cautious about considering music as "evolving". The Blues uses dominant 7th shape chords in a non-functional way. I don't think it's particularly illuminating to trace them back to a Bach chorale harmonisation.


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If you Google dominant seventh and ninth chords wikipedia gives a good overview of the early usage of those, i.e., they did appear in classical music. This wasn't obvious perhaps, since the classical composers used those chords as harmonic devices among many others, where their use in blues is pretty insistent. As far as harmonic forms, I believe harmonic ...


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The simplest approach is to consider the tonality as G Mixolydian; here, Bb is simply an altered chord (the III borrowed from the minor).


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A Bb chord is not in the scale of C major, but it's perfectly acceptable (common, even) to use it in a song in that key. It doesn't need any special justification, or to be "borrowed" from anywhere. It's just the chord on the b7th. Very commonplace.


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There is often the facility in a song to use the PARALLEL KEY. For instance, in C maj., there's C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bo. In C min., there'll be Cm, Do, Eb, Fm, Gm, Ab, Bb. So any of this bank can and are used in a piece 'in C'. This then says that the piece in question could well be 'in C'. Thinking another way, with all but the G chord, it could be in F. ...


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There is no key which contains both G major and Bb major. Because that would require both B and Bb notes. It could be voiced as an A#, to fit the standard rule that a scale has each lettered note name exactly once. The Chords describe these notes (although they may be 'spelled' differently, meaning Bb can be expressed as A#) G, A, Bb, B, C, D, F No ...


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I would say it's a G mixolydian. I listened to the song, and the G and C both had strong tonality, although the G felt more like tonic, so it's the mode of C starting on G which would be mixolydian. The Bb chord is probably a result of the artist trying to give the song a minor feel, because it modulates to g minor, then promptly back into the G mixolydian. ...


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Before I answer your question, I think it will be helpful to explain "harmony". The melody of the song is conveyed via single notes. We often refer to chords that are played with the melody notes as the "harmony" part of the song. Dictionary.com has the following for the definition of "harmony": the simultaneous combination of tones, especially when ...


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Working from your example: C and F are both part of the F major chord, so you can hold one F major chord for both of those notes. G and D are both part of the G major chord, so you could just hold a G major chord for both notes. So you would have F major, then G major. Another way to do it: F and D are both part of a D minor chord, so you could hold D ...


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It takes time to get the technique. The best tip I can give if you don't know this already is not to lay your index finger totally flat but to roll it round slightly so that it is the bony side, rather than the fleshy pad of the finger pressing down. For F shape barre chords there is trick for avoiding them altogether (Jimi Hendrix reportedly did this) - ...


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If the strings buzz on the frets when you play the chord you should check a few things: Are you applying enough pressure on each string? Are you applying the pressure in the correct location? Is your finger pushing down straight? 1. As Tetsujin mentioned in his comment, you might not have the strength to push hard enough. This will come given enough ...


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As you say, it's something that 'pads out' the mix to fill space. Often the word 'pad' is used when talking about synthesized sounds, and refers to how a specific sound 'sits in the mix'. So you wouldn't really say that 'organs are pads' in general, because there are a lot of different organ sounds, some of which are very cutting upfront sounds (hence not ...


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My definition of a pad is something that is used to fill in the space of a piece usually with chords. This is pretty much spot on. Like the orchestra uses the string section to play chords, people use synth pads to fill in with chords. I'll borrow the wiki definition: A synth pad is a sustained chord or tone generated by a synthesizer, often ...


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Because it's 'in key' (no accidentals) when rooted on the dominant of the key..... ie. In the key of C (all white notes) G7 uses all white notes..... C7 and F7 both have the seventh as an accidental (black note in C). So to stay in key you have major sevenths built on the first and fouth chords (root and ...


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I'd recommend taking a step-by-step approach: Figure out what the notes are. You can't know what chord it is without knowing what notes there are. From top to bottom, the notes are: G♯, E, C♯ (twice) Figure out what chord it is. You can't know what the chord inversion is without knowing what chord it is. There's only one way to arrange the ...


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An inversion is just determined by what note of the chord is in the bass. Root position has the root in the bass, first inversion has the third in the bass, second has the fifth in the bass, and third has the 7th in the bass. Once you know what chord you are looking at, you know what the root, third, and fifth is. I'm not going to give you the answer to ...


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In common practice four part harmony the bass note dictates the inversion. So, first identify the chord by the notes that make it: C#-E-G# --> that's C# min, or iii in A Maj. So C# is the root of this chord, and it's in the bass, so it's a root chord. If E was in the bass, it would be 1st inversion (C#6); if G# was in the bass it would be 2nd inversion ...


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It's a matter of voicing: many chord changes happen by just changing few notes slightly. If there is a dedicated bass note keeping track of the respective root, it tends to jump around a lot, not maintaining a melodic line of its own. Omitting such a bass line makes the resulting changes more subtle and work on their own, like reciting a poem without ...



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