Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I have seen people who can get that F on the first (highest) string, but it is almost freakish. Usually that highest string is muted for me. Also, I would never fail to barre the sixth (lowest) string. Just remember in this voicing, your root note is on the fifth string. If you are "boom chucking" (playing root/chord/fifth/chord' etc.) it puts that lower ...


2

If I want the high E string, if I need the high note, I play it with the middle finger on the G string, the ring finger on the D string and the pinky on the B. If I play the two-finger chord, I don't even want the high E. I know you can, but it isn't what I'm doing.


1

Another option is to use the 4th finger to barr the 3 notes at the 3rd fret - my 4th finger will bend further and be able to leave the top string untouched. (Took a few weeks of practice though!)


6

Both answers are great, but do you know there are other ways to play this chord here. The index barre can be over all 6 strings, which can all be strummed. It just gives an inversion of Bb. 3 fingers can be used, on 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Otherwise, two fingers can be used, with two strings held down by one finger, and the other with another finger. As ...


26

I use this kind of "A-shape" barre chord all the time, although I must admit I rarely teach it to students. I actually find it easier than using fingers 2, 3 and 4 to play the three fret 3 notes. All you have to do is bend your third L.H. finger backwards, so that the joint nearest the knuckle moves forwards and away from string 1. Here's a picture of me ...


21

Not everybody can do this but the trick is your finger forms a 2nd, partial barre at the 3rd fret, but bends so it raises above the highest string. Some people play A like this as standard however I believe it partly comes down to luck how long your fingers are, how practical this technique will be. Check out this awful drawing:


4

0The 'o' bit designates dim, or diminished. Slightly different from the ø which is half-diminished. Wish my keyboard could print it properly - it probably can, but I'm not clever enough to make it work! Half-dim., incidentally is aka m7b5.


4

You can try to use chords that are common to both keys, and re-interpret their function. For your example (A minor and B minor), the common triads are D, Em, E, and G (note that in minor both the 6th and the 7th scale degree can be either minor or major). Also note that a ii-V progression always leads nicely to the I chord. Examples: || Am | Dm | Em ...


3

A good way to a modulation is via a diminished chord. Thus Am - Ao - F#7 - Bm. As the dim contains A and F# (Gb for purists, maybe?), it bridges nicely. Or going bluntly, Am - Bbm - Bm. Or a staccato stop on Am, Then a rest, then straight into Bm. It shouldn't be difficult to re-pitch if that bit's sung.


1

the chord tones for #IVdim are: #iv, vi, i , ##ii (where these refer to scale degrees). This contains two tones that are already part of Imaj6: vi, i And it contains two tones that lead into two more Imaj basic chord tones: iv# --> v ii## -->iii so you have a chord that has two leading tones into the target chord, this is why it is a natural choice of ...


2

While Matt's answer is not wrong, I would include a few other thoughts. My initial thought was that this could be a Common Tone Diminished chord. From my experience, this is something that has typically been associated with the Classical repertoire but could certainly be applied elsewhere. This would specifically apply to fully diminished 7 chords, not ...


1

Enharmonically this is the same as Idim7 -> I(maj7), which is a common progression (at least in jazz or jazzy arrangements). One famous example is the beginning of the jazz standard Misty by Erroll Garner. If you really have #IVdim7 -> I(maj7) then you probably actually have #IVdim7 -> I(with 5 in the bass), so the bassline moves up chromatically.


0

i agree with previous posters that there is no hard and fast rule on how long and how much each chord should be played. If the song is upbeat or high spirited, i might play the chords twice in a bar, or if a part of the lyrics needs an emphasis i could even play the chords at each beat. Sometimes there is a dominant prolongation that can encompass more than ...


3

The one that immediately comes to mind for me is the jazz tune "Autumn Leaves." It was originally written in Gm, but for analysis purposes it's easier to think of in, say, Em. In that case the chord progression goes Am7 - D7 - Gmaj7 - Cmaj7 - F#m7b5 - B7 - Em7 (ivm7-VII7-IIImaj7-VIMaj7-iim7b5-V7-im7) - and there's your diatonic 4-7-3-6-2-5-1 progression ...


6

I'm not sure if you're interested in classical examples, but this kind of thing happens all the time in Baroque music, almost to the point of being ubiquitous. One quick example that pops to mind is this section from Brandenburg Concerto #2. Start the passage right at (or slightly before) 2:00 (apparently SE doesn't honor t=### tags in youtube links). This ...


2

Especially in minor you'll find this progression quite often, actually so often that it has become a cliché which many people try to avoid. One example of this progression (in minor) is "Still Got The Blues" by Gary Moore (in A minor, so it starts on the D minor chord). The II chord (which would be the VII chord of the relative major key) is a ...


1

Just a brief meta-theoretical note: Rockin' Cowboy's answer above recapitulates a whole line of 19th-ct attempts to derive the basic functions of tonal music from the major triad (which at least one theorist called the "Chord of Nature" because of the way it follows the overtone series). In order to do that, they constructed a dualist system: that is, for ...


0

Because in a major key: the tonic must not contain the scale's fourth (iv) tone the subdominant must contain the scale's fourth tone but not the seventh the dominant must contain at least the scale's seventh or both the seventh and fourth


3

the third (A) and seventh (Eb) of F7 also correspond to the third (Eb) and seventh (A) of B7, so you are basically substituting B7 for F7 (with some of the tension notes altered on the B7: #4 and b9 which are typical modifications on a dominant 7th).


15

It's known as a tritone substitution. In jazz you can substitute any dominant-seventh chord with the one a tritone (b5 or #4) away. This works because of the major-third and minor-seventh which are in every dominant-seventh chord. These make the interval of a tritone, which is exactly half an octave, and so gives exactly the same notes when transposed by a ...


0

To answer my own question after edification from the community, the theory behind why the notes of a chord blend well together and the theory behind which chords in a major key are the major chords that work for that key are basically two different theories. A major chord is comprised of a root, a major 3rd (4 semitones or two whole steps above root) and ...


0

Kudos for expanding your musical horizons by learning the guitar. I find it to be one of the most versatile musical instruments available. A capo is not required to play a song on guitar in any key you desire but will make it much easier to play in certain keys. The way a guitar and similar fretted stringed instruments are set up makes it difficult to ...


0

I'm guessing since you mention sessions and whistles that your major focus is on Irish or Scottish music. With a D whistle you'd be playing mostly in D and G, I think you'll find the best results to capo 3 and play in G positions for Bb (equivalent of D in a D whistle) and stay on capo 3 and play in C position for Eb (equivalent of playing in G on a D ...


0

I'd like to add my five cents concerning seventh chords notation. A seventh chord (according to the polytonality paradigm) can be represented as two triads stacked vertically: the lower triad (1st level of polytonality) is built from the tonic and the upper triad (2nd level of polytonality) is stacked on the top of the lower one. In general, a seventh ...


0

You said that it's the relationship between the three notes that makes it sound good. So why do you think picking out those notes individually and basing new chords on them is the way to do it? You lose the relationships that the original chord had. In the key of C Major, the I chord is the C Major chord (C-E-G). The iii chord in C Major is E minor ...


0

Lets say you are talking about C major: You say the E (third chord in the scale) and G (fifth chord in the scale) should be major chords. The problem with that lies in the major chord itself. By definition the major chord is a major third (equivalent to two whole steps distance) followed by a minor chord (a distance of a whole step plus a half step). This ...


2

The thing is simply, that the structure of major chords and the harmonic pattern I IV V do not depend on the same laws of tonality. A major chord is built with the overtones 4, 5 and 6, and this comes out to be a structure depending on thirds. Meaning in overtone scale the overtones 4, 5 and 6 build up the major chord of the base tone. The harmonic ...


0

There are a few misconceptions you have. Let's take a look at your first statement in your question: A major triad (chord) is formed by using the 1 and 3 and 5 notes of the scale in whatever key you are in. This is not true because if you were in a minor key, the 1st, 3rd, and 5th note of the scale would make a minor triad. 1, 3, and 5 are just scale ...


1

As others have pointed out, the "1, 3, 5" of a chord are relative to the root of the chord, not the key. It's important to realize that any note in the key (or even outside of it, but let's ignore that) can be the root of a chord. What these numbers mean, is that once you've picked some note of the scale as a root for your chord, you create the rest of the ...


2

No. The definition of a major triad in canonical form (in practice it can be spaced out in terms of octaves, inverted and its members doubled, obviously, hence "canonical") is not 1-3-5 in terms of major scale degrees; it is 4 semitones (a major third) and 7 semitones (a perfect fifth) from a given root, any given root. In a major scale, it happens that ...


8

Actually, a major chord is formed by using a root, a major third and a perfect fifth. Doesn't necessarily have to be the 1,3 and 5 of the scale. Let's take the C major scale and see for which root notes we have the major third and the perfect fifth: C; the third is E (major third), the fifth is G (perfect) -> Major Chord (I) D; the third is F (minor) E; ...


0

Yes, Fruity Loops (now called FL Studio) will create chords, but will not create progressions for you. To create pop music you must understand something about harmony, form, contrast, and other principles of music composition.


0

You could also tune the guitar down a half step to get the Natural open Bb / Eb and Ab. Some of the open chords may be different then but it is an option.


1

@MattL's answer is good, so I'll simply expand on it a little. It's worth noting that choice of chord shapes should be governed by a number of factors, and playing as many strings as possible is not necessarily the most important. Playing a chord shape that uses six strings will usually be loudest and most full sounding, but this isn't always what you want. ...


0

Adding to Dave's answer, specifically playing along with a Bb instrument, *capo 1st fret, use 'open' A, D and E, or E7. *capo 3rd fret, use 'open' G, C and D, or D7. *capo 6th fret, use 'open' E, A and B7. Slight problems for a beginner would be - in the first case, F#m, Bm and C#m. In the second - Bm, and the third - F#m, G#m and C#m, as all those ...


3

The reasoning behind the chord voicing you found in the book is that it is a pure four-part voicing of a dominant seventh-chord, without repetition of notes. So you don't need any other strings to play that chord. Of course, the chord shape you suggest is well known and it sound good in most contexts, but it is redundant in the sense that it doubles the ...


1

For guitar players the keys E, A, D, G, C (and relative minors/modes) are considered "easy" keys -- the common, beginer open chords fall in these keys. And especially for acoustic guitars, the ringing of open strings in these keys is a part of the guitar's tonal quality, and is desireable for some styles of music. So what do you do when you want to play in ...


1

A guitar in standard tuning is actually a good fit for the key of G major (E minor) since the you can take advantage of some basic open chords in the key of G major which are G(I), Am(ii), C(IV), D(V), and Em(vi) as shown below: G Am C D Em If you were to put a capo on the 2nd fret you would be able to use the same shapes to make the same relative ...


2

Oddly enough, I actually ran into this very scenario yesterday as I was giving a guitar lesson. I initially had the student play the G in the way you describe, with pinkie on the high "e" (I always play this way as it is much easier for many other chord shapes). After seeing the student struggle quite a bit, we switched to the other fingering indicated in ...


2

It's something , as a teacher, that I've never addressed. Whichever is the easier option is the one taken. It's after all, within the first half a dozen chords a beginner will learn. Fingers will be weak, but one way or other will suit most.At some point, they need strengthening, so why not start immediately? Occasionally, pupils will also use the 3rd fret ...


1

Print a copy of the Circle of Fifths from the internet and use it as a guide. You will probably discover through your own experimentation or by reading about it on-line, that it sounds better when you transition from one key to another if you don't jump more than two places on the circle from the key you are on. You can see from the circle of fifths that as ...


0

The answers here are good. But if you don't want to think so hard, you can always use any one of numerous on line chord identifier sites where you simply type in the notes and it gives you a list of the possible chords it could be. Then pick the one that fits in the key and mode the rest of the song is in. Search for "What chord is this?" and you will ...


0

There are already a whole load of answers but I thought I'd share some nice videos on the topic - and also to reiterate "everybody struggles with this!" There's no magic 'trick' to barre chords, you just have to practice both the technique and build up some strength. Just like you have to build up calluses on your fingertips over time, you have to build up ...


0

Long term success with barre chords comes from repetition and proper form. Be sure your thumb is directly behind your barre finger when you form the chord. To make things easier as you build strength, try tuning the guitar a half or whole step flat which will reduce the string tension and make it easier to play barre chords. If you don't want to play your ...


0

This is strictly in C-Major Ionian mode CDEFGABC. If we were using another mode like Dorian (DEFGABCD) would we still use the same chords, or would we have to reformulate our triads based on the 'new' scale? Well, both things are true. If you change to another mode for the very scale (D dorian in your example), you don't need to reformulate ...


1

I think it's pretty difficult to guess the chord only by the tab as you don't know the root or even if played notes are within the chords. At most, you could guess the scale by joining the featuring notes, indentifying the major key so you could infer all the possible chords (3 majors, 3 minors and a diminshed) for that key, But that's of course if you are ...


2

Yeah, most of the basic chords will be the same, but how you use them will differ. Most of the minor-like modes will need some help with leading tones, that is, melodic semitones into the final (the tonic note of the mode), which will add altered chords. Also, you will probably tend to avoid certain progressions so as to keep the tonic from being ...


3

The different modes derived from any particular scale will contain the same notes. This means that while staying in the key, you will have the same chords available to you. The main difference between being in one mode vs. another is what we treat as tonic, or home base as I like to refer to it for those that don't know the term tonic. This means that the ...


4

The chords available to you in a given key are the same no matter what mode you choose. This is because you're still constructing the chords from the same set of 7 notes. For example, in C major, you have CDEFGAB, and no sharps or flats. That means that (ignoring "fancier" chords"), the chord on C is CEG = C major, the chord on D is DFA = D minor, and so ...


1

It is a bII maj13(#11) (i.e. Gbmaj13(#11)) chord, which is borrowed from phrygian, and which resolves to I (i.e. F). Note that this is no tritone substitution, otherwise it should be Gb7 (9,#11,13), with a minor seventh in it. This chord has a major seventh. The way it is played here it has no fifth, but a 9th and a 13th, and a #11, I believe. The voicing I ...



Top 50 recent answers are included