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1

The standard way that I learned in music school is that in a major key, the tonic-subdominant-dominant chords are all major and therefore are notated in upper case Roman numerals: I - IV - V. Arabic numbers are for individual notes, for example "3" is the third note in the scale (starting from the bottom). For a minor key, generally speaking tonic is ...


0

I have heard this used: "the chart."


0

As already stated, 'changes' is common. 'Chord sequence' is the other term often used. "What is the chord sequence for the middle eight?" Or "whole song..." O.k. - two words rather than one. Who's counting?


1

You might use the phrase harmonic structure to refer to the piece as a whole in the context of talking about its, well, harmonic structure. E.g.: The song's/piece's harmonic structure is interesting because of the downwards modulation in the middle.


2

There is no technical term for it that I know of. The only word I can think of is "changes", often used by jazz players. Do you know the changes for "I got rhythm"? If you do, then you can comp on it or improvise on it because you know every chord, all the way through. That is, you know the entire chord progression of the song. There's no other word for ...


1

There is no reason why if you have large fingers you cannot do a two string barre with middle or ring fingers but this is not really the easiest way of doing it. What I find works pretty well is the half positions or what some I think call the cage system. Instead of going from a normal open A chord and breaking your locked hand and then going for another ...


6

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


1

I'd say to always use the key-chord as 1. I'm a classical guy and never really got NNS. Maybe this is somewhat from ignorance, so downvotes are welcome. :) My biggest problem with many chord description systems is that they don't handle complexity with clarity or can't describe some chords - half-diminished seventh chords are a typical case. There are ...


0

Lets have a review about what exactly those Roman Numerals mean. They Indicate the scale degree on which the chord is build and also what sort of chord we have to do with and also the inversion. The Four Main chord types you will have to do with in your harmony work is... Major (Major Third / Perfect Fifth) minor (Minor Third / Perfect Fifth) Augmented ...


2

There's no reason, really, that it's better the other way. If you keep thinking as you have been, it works for you (and me !). When it has to be translated into real chords for a particular key, then the real chords will be written. At that point, anyone playing the piece will know what to play. I, IV and V in a major key will be the same letter names as i, ...


3

Chord progressions are nice, and a lot of good songs have been made using them, but to move on to more complex patterns (or make your own progressions) you really need to learn the personalities of the different chords as well as some common transitions between chords. I'll try my best to explain it, but it is really hard ... especially on a forum. I'll ...


1

All the answers so far provide good advice. I would like to emphasize that - while you are building up the needed finger and hand strength to cleanly fret a 5 or 6 string barre chord, it will make it easier and less stressful on your developing muscles if you have a guitar that is optimized for easier playing. Not all guitars are created equal. But ...


1

RHavin puts it well. I would add this: check your string guage and action too (the distance of the strings from the fretboard). Heavier strings require more effort so using a light string such as .011 can help. If the action is high it will need lowered. And yes, do practice higher up the neck. Check your hand position is not too bent at the wrist. Keep ...


2

It all depends on holding your hand. I'd really suggest that you let someone show you how to hold a fretted chord. If you insist on trying for yourself, try the following: move your index finger up or down until you dont have any strings in the gaps under your joints, where the pressure on the string is usually weakest. move your finger to the fret, best ...


0

It's very hard to tell without being there, seeing how your hand is positioned and hearing the sound. When I was learning, barre chords (those where you need to fret more than one string with one finger) were always the most difficult. Unless you can press firmly with the full length of your finger then some strings will sound deadened. This comes with ...


8

When you fret one string, and have your fretting finger just behind the fret it is easy to make the note ring out, as you are focusing pressure on that fingertip. When you fret a barre chord, you need to be able to put that same amount of pressure on each string, in the same position, just behind the fret, and this is just difficult at first. It requires ...


2

The progression F - Fm - C/G is a technique used in many songs. The F is the IV of C. The walk down is in the third of the F chord (A) to F Minor (Ab) then to the C Major (G), there is a G bass note over the C chord. So their is a chromatic movement of A-Ab-G in the harmony. 'Wake Me Up When September Ends' uses this over the hook in the song. It is used ...


3

The answer is in fact "C#/G#" (a C# with a G# as the bass note). That chord can be played as an A shaped barre chord on the 4th fret (446664). But playing the progression - Am, C, E, Am, G, F, Fm, C/G a semitone higher will mean having to play all barre chords instead of the open Am, E, and G and C/G. Not sure why you would want to do that. If your ...


0

just a couple of additional comments: To compute a measure of dissonance one should take into account harmonics, i.e. compute all the pairwise contributions to the measureand sum them up (not too hard to do). For chords of more than two pitches you just sum up all the pairwise contributions to the measure, fundamentals and harmonics. Dissonance decreases ...


8

C#. Because it's the same thing, shifted up a semi-tone.


1

That's a great question. Let me tell you what works for me. When I write a song, I usually start with a chord progression because that is easier than starting with a melody in my experience. A chord progression will provide the framework for the melody. You need to know what chords go in the key you want your song to be in. Some handy charts might ...


4

Start small. Although it's possible to change chord progressions and scales in a song, it sounds to me like doing so effectively is currently beyond your skill level. So, what you will want to do is pick a scale and then harmonize the chords to it, or vice-versa. The first thing you need to do is decide what key you're in; this will determine the scale ...


0

Adding a few minor 7 flat 5 chords (or half diminished 7ths) to that list would open up your repertoire quite a bit. Many songs with circle progressions - Autumn Leaves and Stranger in paradise, etc - use this type of chord. Em7b5, Am7b5, Bm7b5 and F#m7b5 all have simple open shapes. eg. Em7b5 - 010030 Am7b5 - X01013 Bm7b5 - X20201 F#m7b5 - 202210


9

It is actually misleading to think about this music in terms of chords as we know them, as the system we use to identify and speak about vertical harmonies was still under development during Bach's time. Bach had no concept of a "suspended chord" for instance. Bach did not think of chords the way a guitarist does (moveable stacks of exact intervals, with ...


5

It's an Asus4 chord, which is a suspended chord where the third (C#) is replaced by the fourth (D). The fourth is carried over from the previous chord (D minor), and - as you've suggested - resolves to the third (C#) of the next chord (A major).


1

Check out R.G.T exam grades, for both electric and acoustic, also Rockschool exams.(Both in U.K.) Intermediate may be construed as grade III or IV.


2

To call such chord a Dominant surely saves time and it is practical thing to do when your theory knowledge is strong. However the "major, minor 7th" perfectly describes all the intervals -omitting the fifth- and it is a more straightforward approach to chord learning.


2

I've been playing the guitar for 3-4 years now; I remember the same difficulty with chords: I still can't hit the open G major perfectly sometimes... You need to get used to the shapes of the chords, and practice is the only way. Then you will have difficulties with power chords. The same: practice, play a lot of these chords, and you will feel the ...


0

"...a barre chord...is a type of guitar chord, where one or more fingers are used to press down multiple strings across the guitar fingerboard." (Wikipedia) And, also from Wikipedia: F F E-------------1---------------1--- B-------------1---------------1--- G-------------2---------------2--- D-------------3---------------3--- ...


3

In addition to the two excellent answers here already, there is generally only one sort of chord which actually needs a top 4 string barre - a minor 7th, named off the top string.A basic 'E7' shape could use a barre over all four, to produce the 7th part on the D string, although with an inversion like that, it can sound quite weak. Other chords can be ...


5

Most barre chords can be played using only the four highest strings, on either electric or acoustic. I would not label it as right or wrong to do it that way. If that is the way you choose to play the chords, then that is your decision. Perhaps there is a reason you prefer to play them that way. As an example many people choose to play the F major chord ...


2

I wouldn't say that it's wrong per se. There are many contexts where all you need is a few high notes. But it's worthwhile learning to play a full barre chord across all six strings. It opens up many more possibilities for partial chords on the lower strings, middle strings, or even split with a few muted in the middle. An electric guitar with a band of ...


6

Unfortunately, there's no clear indication why the degree symbol (°) was chosen to represent diminished harmonies. We do have some information about when and how it originated, though; specifically, it arose in conjunction with the use of Roman numerals in harmonic analysis. During the Baroque period, harmonies were notated in shorthand using figured bass. ...


0

You can try using percussive strumming on the muted strings. That always helps me in attaining fullness of tone. If that is not enough you can consider some sort of harmonizer pedal that adds one or two voices a certain interval above and below the root note.


3

It's a very distinct and verbose way to name 7th chords that is derived from classic theory. I'm not sure if it has a name or even needs a name as there's always more then one way to name chords for example some people use Co7 to represent a fully diminished chord and some people use Cm6b5 to denote the same chord and call it that. I'll refer to it as 7th ...


3

I don't know if the major-minor thing has a name, but the idea is to dissociate the actual intervals from the tonal function. Calling a chord a "major minor seventh" is simply describing the chord without any context, and calling a chord a "dominant" chord is describing a relationship with the tonic. In the kind of Classical music that is typically used to ...


2

As with many questions asked here, the answer is practice; lots of practice. The simplest way to practice is to play songs -- sing or whistle if you like; you don't need to sing well if you're practising in private. By playing actual songs, you learn functional sets of chords that work together, and the way your left hand can shift from one of these to ...


2

A little context would help: a few more measures on either side, the name of the composer/era, etc. However, as a general rule, when the melody is in the bass like this the harmonic analysis focuses on the upper notes, and bass-melodic non-chord tones are identified in relation to them. For example, beat 2 of the first measure and beat 1 of the second look ...



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