Hot answers tagged

7

The notes and the sharp/flat pairs you refer to are only the same if you are tuning to 12-tone equal temperament. But they become different pitches if you are tuning to just intonation, Pythagorean intonation or some other temperament. The examples you cite in Wikipedia are there to contrast the distinction between 12-tone equal temperament (where there are ...


7

Twelve-Tone Tonality by George Perle may be useful. As to 'what kind of structure a piece would have', remember, you can structure music not only with pitches, but also time. I deem time to be an even more basic consideration than pitch in music. So ask: is there a regular beat? how many parts to divide a beat into? can you use two kinds of durations to ...


5

Indeed, you need to bend notes on the diatonic harmonica because all notes are not available. And even when you'll be able to bend them, you'll find out that a few of them are still missing, and you'll then need to learn overblows to obtain them -- but you can worry about that later. You can, but don't need to bend notes on the chromatic harmonica because ...


4

I assume that by "tones" you mean pitches, and that you're talking about an instrument that can only produce nine fixed pitches -- like a toy piano or glockenspiel. The conventional approach is to have notes corresponding to the white notes on a piano; that is the notes of C major, choosing a range such that a whole octave of C major can be played, perhaps ...


4

This is a fairly broadly worded question. Certainly, there are extreme, formalized, structured ways to employ the chromatic scale; Rein Henrich's link to Schoenberg's twelve-tone system is an excellent resource to get one started; I'd also direct you to the page on serialism. Generally speaking, however, composers will use chromaticism as a tool or a way ...


3

You have to look at what you have and look at where you are going. Like you said, the A does not naturally exist in C major, however, I think it would be a stretch to say it borrowed from A major since there is such a big jump to the parallel major of the relative minor key especially since the Em doesn't make A seem like a temporary tonic and neither G7 nor ...


3

I did actually encounter this as a real problem. I had a break-in and all of my instruments and gear were stolen. All, except the 'Third Man" zither. To play my rock songs on a zither, I had to re-tune it to the key of the song. Fortunately, everything recent had been written using an Open-F guitar tuning, so the songs were all in C, C-minor, F, F-minor. ...


3

I think you could use a "modal" approach. And by this I mean to focus less on the key you're palying, e.g. A minor, and more on the notes and the mode they imply. For example, assuming A is your lowest note, if you want the minor (aeolian) feeling you could go for the notes A, C and E present in the Am chord and add B, D and F to develop some melody. But ...


3

In general, the music composed using a twelve-tone scale is called atonal. Schoenberg was a major proponent of twelve-tone technique (although he himself rejected the term "atonal") and an influential music theorist. If you want to learn how to compose music with the chromatic scale, what you're basically asking is how to compose in the manner of the ...


2

It is possible to have multiple keys in a song. Charles Mingus in 'Nostalgia in Times Square' changed 3 keys in as many bars. He used chromatic notes in the melody as well. So, don't try to narrow your progression down to only one possible key. Now, let's say you are in D major: F#m -> 3rd chord of the scale. F -> chromatic. The bass goes F# to F(natural) ...


2

I find chromatic runs to be most effective in very small doses. Like a single chromatic passing tone. It adds a little dab of "color" to the phrase. You can harmonize the passing tone (usually with a chromatic mediant) to increase the size of the "brush". Or extend the passage over a longer interval, and harmonize select accents to sound like a dripping, ...


2

Starting from C and going up, there's the standard 1/2 3 1 3 1 2 3 1 3 1 3 1 2. This is usually enough. With practice it should work for that particular run in Beethoven. The trick to make things faster is to use longer groupings. With the above fingering most groups are (1 3) and some are (1 2 3). So, let's use (1 2 3) and (1 2 3 4) instead. Starting from ...


2

I don't know about standards; there are lots of different fingerings for Chopin's Op.25 No.6, for example. The one I'd play in the Grieg concerto (first run) is 1-5, 2-4, 2-3, 1-5, 2-4, 1-5, 2-4, 1-3, 2-4, 2-3, 1-5, 2-4, 1-5, ... This is a regular fingering: 1-5 always for the white-white pairs, 2-4 -> 2-3 slide is always before the white keys with no ...


2

The pentatonic scale has always been a common scale choice when the number of notes is limited. It offers the largest range for the fewest number of pitches The scale allows you to play in multiple keys (most importantly, tonic and dominant) All the notes of the tonic and dominant chords are present within the scale Therefore, the pentatonic scale ...


2

Each and every fret on a guitar represents one semitone. Thus to move from a C, 1st fret, 2nd string, go up to 2nd fret for C#, and 3rd fret for D (+one tone - or two semitones). When the string is, say, an open E, then moving up one semitone by fretting fret 1, it plays F, and another fret up (fret 2) plays F#. Semitones are generally thought of as the ...


2

Everything and nothing. Since every one of the 12 edo notes feature in the chromatic scale, any conceivable chord will fit, although it sounds better if the note/s played over that chord are actually contained within that chord. Having said that, melodies, in the Western world at least, tend to be made from the diatonic notes of a scale, which makes them ...


1

The chords could be anything. In the C chromatic scale, for the I chord we can have: C major: C,E,G C minor: C,Eb,G C augmented: C,E,G# C half diminished: C,Eb,Gb,Bb C diminished: C,Eb,Gb,A All of the above can be used in the chromatic scale, because all of the above notes belong in the chromatic scale. The same goes for the 11 other notes in the scale.


1

Your stated "understanding" is wrong. Those notes are not the same. Many violinist and singers (etc.) will use one or more of those separate tunings, as the ratio between notes in a given key can be much more harmonically accurate (e.g. not irrational numbers) compared to using just 12-tone equal temperament semitone spaced notes. And to a discerning ...


1

It's difficult to tell which are the passing chords from your example because there's no time values. Passing chords are of short duration and/or occur on off-beats. So absent that, I would look at the chord tones for each to determine what melody to play. F#m: F# A C# ("color tones": E G# B D) F: F A C ("color tones": E G Bb D) Esus2: E B F# Ebm7b5: Eb ...


1

Like you, I've searched for a while for information about 22-hole chromatic harmonicas. The only 22-hole instruments I've found information about don't have different blow and draw notes for each hole. Instead, instruments such as the Unica 22-hole chromatic harmonica have two, rather than four notes, for each hole. (Usually, a chromatic harmonica has 4 ...


1

When your starting from scratch, the best advice is try not to worry about specific guidelines or rules or scales. If your trying to keep a creative perspective on how to do a song then it's all up to you and how the song should be listened to. You never know how the finished product may turn out. It may be something you never intended to sound like but you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible