Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

My response will be in part influenced by the information I gathered from reading your profile. My first suggestion to you is to strongly encourage you to learn an instrument. If you're serious about writing music and about having it played by live performers, having a working knowledge of the instruments is important. It is paramount to be technically ...


6

With a fast enough tempo, it could be quite a few! :-) Necessarily, you would need to time it out at your score's tempo to find a number, but the clarinet in general has a lot of resistance compared to other wind instruments, so the amount of airflow is relatively small. Depending on the range of the instrument in which this note occurs, a good clarinetist ...


6

I am assuming for this answer that you are wanting to adjust commercial reeds made from cane (not synthetic materials), and that you are not trying to make your own reeds from blanks or from stalks of cane. I have always felt that my time with the saxophone was too limited as it was. So, I always wanted to keep the reed work as simple and quick as possible ...


6

It really depends on where it was taken, who it was taken to, and how much needed to be done to it. If it was taken to a small, local person with little demand and all it needed was new corks / pads, it wouldn't be too much. If it was local or taken out of state to someone in high-demand / highly regarded and needed a lot of work, it could also have cost a ...


5

Saxophones and oboes are conical, and behave like closed conical pipes. They are closed at the reed, just like the clarinet. Flutes are cylindrical, and behave like open cylindrical pipes. The sound is made by blowing across the opening at the head joint, and it is not closed like in other woodwinds. Clarinets are cylindrical like the flute, but closed ...


4

Disclaimer: I’m a fellow sax player and have more or less never blown into a clarinet. As you probably know a clarinet does not have an octave key (it has a key which makes the clarinet jump to the fifth of the octave instead). Because of that, you shouldn’t expect fingerings between saxophone and clarinet to be related at all. Other than that, I’m ...


4

Have you considered a brass instrument like trombone or euphonium? For me, the embouchures share some important characteristics, while still being distinct enough that one shouldn't mess up the other. If you are an advanced player and plan on pursuing music as a career, I would highly recommend continuing to practice bassoon throughout marching season, ...


3

There are generally a few levels of "reconditioning" that could have been done, depending on the quality of the clarinet and how badly it had been neglected. Re-Pad - All padded keys have their pads replaced. Typically also includes cleaning and lubrication of key hinges. Some shops will also replace felt and cork key silencers and any corked key pads at ...


2

For all woodwinds, plastic mouthpieces are generally "starters" that come with student clarinets. Professional mouthpieces are usually made of a hard rubber called ebonite. How difficult the mouthpiece is to play depends entirely on the design and shape of the piece (largely on the tip opening and how that is matched with your reed strength), not on the ...


2

If you hear an air-rushing sound, it's almost certainly due to reed strength, as you are finding out. Leaks in pads or body joints are more likely to produce squeaky notes, or make it difficult/impossible to play notes which expect the given pad to be closed. But far more important: please take some lessons from a qualified instructor. It's all too ...


2

Practice long tones on just the mouthpiece and barrel with a tuner at first. You should produce a C# (concert). Your embouchure should be firmer, but don't bite. The chin should be stretched flat at all times and the jaw should never move. Basically: corners in, top lip stretched down, chin flat. The "smile" embouchure should be avoided, as should any ...


2

Given that most of the reed players I've worked with bring sax (tenor/alto/soprano) and a clarinet and often a flute, leads me to say it won't be too much of a problem. SOME of the fingering is the same, and the embouchure is similar. Since you have musical knowledge from playing piano as well, it will be quite an enjoyable, straightforward job. I'm often ...


1

I played tenor sax for years in junior high and high school band. I learned several instruments in the interim, one of them being clarinet. It was probably the easiest to transition to from saxophone, as the fingering and the embouchure are both pretty similar. The mouthpiece is smaller, and so your embouchure will need to be a bit firmer/tighter than ...


1

Choose whichever instrument you believe you will find most joyous to play! This is to ensure that you will enjoy spending time practicing. Spending time practicing something you don't enjoy I believe will be bad for your overall joy of practicing music. I think all other aspects are of minor importance to this. In my opinion the only thing that would mess ...


1

A long time ago I used to be a saxophonist, and later picked up bassoon and carried that into becoming a professional bassoonist. (However I've undertaken a career change long since.) In the course of my musical career, I learned to make my own bassoon reeds, and adjust them with knife and sandpaper (other implements required, of course.) While I was ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible