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5

In this admittedly limited study, they record one oboist using more than double (over 110 cm H2O) the blowing pressure to play fortissimo compared to two different clarinetists (both around 50 cm H2O), also playing fortissimo. The other oboist in the study blew a peak pressure of about 80 cm H2O for fortissimo playing. A better graphical comparison is ...


5

I play all 3 instruments. Saxophone is simply an easier instrument than clarinet overall, and is more commonly used in rock music. It's the natural choice. That being said, oboists often find clarinet easier because the embouchure is a bit firmer, which they're used to. Sax embouchure can feel awkwardly loose, especially on tenor and lower saxes. I know ...


4

Disclaimer: former clarinet and sax player, never double reed. As Edouard points out, the sax goes in octaves just as an oboe does. However, it doesn't take long to get the "feel" of the octave+fifth that the clarinet uses. The clarinet requires a somewhat tighter embouchure than the sax, so you may find it less of a jump from the extremely tight oboe ...


4

Violin is a very intuitive and expressive instrument with lots of degrees of freedom which makes it one of the instruments benefiting most from early adoption and lessons (which are a cost factor for most). Like the clarinet, it is an instrument with continuous control of tone, but also with effortless and continuous adoption of pitch. If you take it up ...


3

I find that the mustiness smell mostly comes from the case. I'd suggest vacuuming the case then leaving it out in the sun for a few hours. For the instrument, wipe it down with a dry rag or paper towel. You can get any of the dust out from between the keys using a small soft paint brush or q-tip. If the smell still does not go away and it seems that it is ...


3

As tuning up is difficult for any wind-instrument it is better when it comes with a slightly higher 'base' tuning already. If you pull the mouthpiece out you can tune the clarinet down but you couldn't tune it up when your mouthpiece is already fully stuck on the instrument. You had to do all tuning corrections with your mouth - which might be difficult ...


2

Since you already have more than a basic grounding in music, just do it! The reason for choosing violin is the offer of a free instrument. Violin is far removed from piano/clarinet in technique, so won't be too easy. For that reason, it's a good choice. Another idea is to get a flute or sax - flutes are inexpensive - and teach yourself, as the fingerings are ...


2

Go for it! Maybe you'll play for a semester or two; maybe you'll make violin your primary instrument. Either way you can't lose. Even if you don't become a soloist, you'll be a better accompanist, conductor, teacher or whatever you end up being for the experience.


2

You can pull out the mouthpiece and tune your clarinet to lower frequencies. That way clarinets tuned to 442Hz can be tuned down to 440Hz with ease when needed. Tuning up is not easy. However, an expensive clarinet is more likely to be used by a professional who would prefer different clarinets for orchestras with different pitches instead of trying to tune ...


2

I have really tried to find an explanation for this since I came across your question. I read some 130 pages in From the Clarinet d’Amour to the Contra Bass A History of Large Size Clarinets, 1740–1860 by Albert R. Rice, but it covers periods only up to late 19th century. Some Google searching found 2 threads (one mentions the other which mentions Rice's ...


1

In addition to guidot's excellent advice, try this exercise: without your clarinet, purse your mouth similar to playing embouchure and, using your diaphragm, blow gently while concentrating on keeping the nasal passage closed. When this works consistently, repeat with increased diaphragm pressure (or smaller mouth opening). ALways concentrate on those ...


1

Leaking air: It sounds to me, that your muscles are still building up - after two months they are surely not fully accustomed to the new tasks. The remedy is regular practice. I have no clear idea, what your snorting may be. It's always difficult to diagnose wind players, since many important processes happen inside. It may be too much or to little muscle ...


1

Mutes I would recommend using something like this: http://www.bill-lewington.com/saxmute.htm It does soften the sound by about 50% for B flat clarinet. Unfortunately, I don't believe that there is a mute made for an E flat clarinet. Another thing you can do is play your clarinet into your closet so that the clothing drowns out the sound. Earplugs ...


1

Disclaimer: not an oboist, nor a clarinetist. Wy guess would be that switching to sax would be the easiest. A sax has an octave key: the second octave fingerings are, basically, the same as the first octave with an additional key pressed. Clarinet’s register key, on the other hand, has a register key which goes to the 12th, not the octave. A quick look at ...


1

The state of a sound pulse at a particular point in a tube any particular time may be characterized by the direction in which the pulse is propagating, the direction of displacement of the air from its "neutral" position, and whether the pressure is higher or lower than the neutral pressure. If air moves so as to cause an increase in pressure, that means ...



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