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5

What makes this complicated is that different brands of mouthpiece makers use different labeling methods for these characteristics. Generally speaking though, you can make the following deductions: Tip Opening: This is the distance from the tip of the reed to the tip of the mouthpiece (when a reed is in place). The wider the tip opening (or higher the ...


5

I play all 3 instruments. Saxophone is simply an easier instrument than clarinet overall, and is more commonly used in rock music. It's the natural choice. That being said, oboists often find clarinet easier because the embouchure is a bit firmer, which they're used to. Sax embouchure can feel awkwardly loose, especially on tenor and lower saxes. I know ...


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Disclaimer: former clarinet and sax player, never double reed. As Edouard points out, the sax goes in octaves just as an oboe does. However, it doesn't take long to get the "feel" of the octave+fifth that the clarinet uses. The clarinet requires a somewhat tighter embouchure than the sax, so you may find it less of a jump from the extremely tight oboe ...


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Much like the strengths of different brands wooden reeds, plastics reeds also vary - a number 3 is not always a number 3! You'll need to find an appropriate comparison chart (like below) for whichever brand of reed you choose to buy. (I'm not sure what's available in Canada, apologies.) I have two Fibracell reeds, and haven't been especially impressed by ...


3

The basic answer (which applies to carbon fiber stringed instruments too) is that our current understanding of materials science is insufficient to produce a material which exhibits as "flat", i.e. uniform frequency resonance curve as wood. Keep in mind that it takes a lot of skill to select proper wood -- there's a reason reed instruments are made ...


2

I trialled all three methods. Both the coke and vinegar solution took some of the tarnish off over about 8 hours, but neither did the entire job. (The coke was more effective, but perhaps using straight vinegar, rather than a solution may help.) The bicarbonate of soda was the most effective method. An hour or two of soaking took a lot of tarnish off, ...


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The only way to really know if it's right for you, is to go to a shop - and try a few things. Clarinet's aren't like computers, you can't buy one based on it's 'specs' in the same way - you're much better going to a shop with a budget, trying a few different instruments and brands, and seeing what suits you. I've had a Google of 'Palatino' - I'd never heard ...


2

I apologize for making this an answer, since I cannot comment due to lack of reputation. I was in various high-school and college orchestras back when I played clarinet (about 4-5 years ago now), so the information I have here for you may be outdated. I tried Legere reeds when they first came out, and have also heard semi-good things about Fibracell. ...


1

Disclaimer: not an oboist, nor a clarinetist. Wy guess would be that switching to sax would be the easiest. A sax has an octave key: the second octave fingerings are, basically, the same as the first octave with an additional key pressed. Clarinet’s register key, on the other hand, has a register key which goes to the 12th, not the octave. A quick look at ...


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The state of a sound pulse at a particular point in a tube any particular time may be characterized by the direction in which the pulse is propagating, the direction of displacement of the air from its "neutral" position, and whether the pressure is higher or lower than the neutral pressure. If air moves so as to cause an increase in pressure, that means ...



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