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It depends exactly what the music is asking for. If that is a quick section not calling for any changes in hand position then leaving the finger covering that fret is the best solution. Lowering the pressure on a fret will attenuate the note, so here you have a choice - either maintain the notes and allow them to ring out or soften them. Typically if you ...


4

Taking the C note from your example - you will need to play the same note a couple of beats later, so it makes sense to leave the finger on until you need it somewhere else. Yes, it's tricky to keep it there, without catching the open top string, but use the tip of your finger rather than the pad, and it will keep out of the way of the top string. In bar 2, ...


7

It's instructing you to bar your finger across the second fret like you would with a barre chord. The 'B' stands for bar and the 'II' represents the second fret. You can even see in the sections where the 'BII' occurs the lowest notes on your fret board are on the 2nd fret.


9

I do see why you prefer the imiimi fingering, you are following a pattern where your fingers are used to three notes on each string, and that feels good. There are some rare but serious classical guitarists that use a three finger technique (imaima) that get a similar feeling without the problems that I discuss below and @Matt also stated. It can be an even ...


4

In this case I see no reason to deviate from alternating between m and i. Your way of playing this phrase limits fluency and speed. Imagine playing the same phrase much faster. Will you still be able to pluck two consecutive notes with your index finger? There are indeed cases where it is easier or more natural (for most players) to use i or m for two ...


2

Your fingering is not necessarily more or less "correct", but you will get a slightly different sound. The suggested fingering will have a more even delineation of the notes, while your fingering will add a little variation in the shaping of the phrase. So,it's a matter of musical interpretation. If you are changing the fingering because you prefer the ...


0

Another problem with adding steel strings to nylon string guitars comes in the form of "how far from the neck the string is." A steel string guitar has the string very close to the neck so that it is playable, whilst a nylon string guitar has it a fair way from the neck so that it plays louder. There is quite a bit of theory involved here, but in simple ...


3

It sounds like the G string is rattling in the nut of your guitar. Have you changed the strings since you purchased the instrument? Sometimes, fitting lower gauge (diameter) strings result in more space to vibrate within the string-groove of the nut, hence the rattle. Alternatively, if the instrument is cheaply made (no disrespect!), the nut may have ...


11

This is not only about the neck. The pattern of bracing under the top, and the bridge plate under the top of your classical guitar, are designed to vibrate with and counteract the tension of nylon strings. Steel strings have twice the tension, so steel strings would cause the top of the guitar to warp upward, or "belly up" and eventually the bridge would rip ...


8

Classical guitar truss rods are not designed for steel strings - I learnt this as a child when my classical (with a truss rod) ended up with a bent rod and cracked neck.


2

@Kevin Johnsrude is correct, but I will add to his list here: It is possible for a guitar to have problems with buzzing that are not caused by the guitarist. The action may be too low. The frets may be too warn. The neck may be warped. Also placing your finger on the string is an art. The target area on your fingers that produces good tone is smaller than ...


4

The buzzing is due to the string rattling against one of the frets. You need to press down with your finger on the D string directly behind the fret. Your finger is too far from the fret so the string is rattling against it.



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