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1

If all 6 were steel, you need to worry. One won't make a lot of difference, more tension on the neck, but mainly on the bridge. I see similar guitars where the bridge has pulled off the body. There is also the difference in sound of that 4th string, and the fact that you have to press harder to fret it. Makes sense to change it, but if the others have been ...


4

Classical guitars are not made to withstand the pressure of steel strings, so yes it is bad to have a steel string on there. At least it is only one strong because with any too much force (more steel strings) the bridge can be pulled off the guitar and the neck warped, so definitely change the string as soon as possible.


0

Did the OP add the price-range part? I don't remember it. We think the answer to that is How do you identify a good guitar? If we excise that part as asked and answered, I'll be happy. I mean seriously, it's about like "I'm travelling out of the country. What language should I learn?" But there are things about the nylon-string "classical" guitar that ...


5

Although much of what I play might be more suited stylistically to an acoustic guitar than an electric, I much prefer playing my electric guitars with the neck pickup and a clean amp, to playing my acoustic. The guitar I play the most is a Fender Squier Bullet, purchased new on sale for US$100 (regularly $150 MSRP); it has height adjustments for the ...


2

Since I'm not you, I don't know your muse and I don't know your wallet. So I cannot answer. There are strengths and weaknesses to each, to the point that I don't consider acoustic guitar and electric guitar the same instrument. With the electric, you have a wide sonic palate, with more and more companies and hobbyists making pedals to make finer shades of ...


1

If by "song" you mean actual singing: How many solo players/singers with an electrical guitar do you remember seeing? How many with an acoustic guitar? Electric guitar is typically employed in band settings, split into "rhythm guitar" and "lead guitar", with lead guitar competing in frequency range, articulation and phrasing with the singers. So its main ...


7

Pick the one that you will have most use for. To use the classical guitar as a stepping stone to electric guitar, which many do, is an overrated approach in my mind. (I did this myself, since that's how it was done in school). Playing techno on a nylon acoustic sounds like a stretch, so that would imply an electric guitar. I assume it's monetary reasons ...


2

If you really aspire to become a good guitar player, I recommend you to choose a classical guitar. The basic techniques are easier to learn on soft nylon strings, especially if you aim for picking and chords (typical pop patterns). However, if your goal is to play fast and very diverse patterns and you just need that electric guitar sound in your music, an ...


1

This seems odd- I can see why you'd be confused. Logically, the common element making the G string buzz if yourself, as you've now tried 3 x guitars ! However I'm sure you've tried checking the string open & on the frets on all guitars. I'd suggest this : Try playing just that string, open, and on all frets, to see how hard you have to oluck it ...


1

If you have a battery plugged in or some other means of powering it, then it is active. I would not recommend plugging it into standard speakers directly as the pickup will not be line level.


2

It looks like the string is butting up against the headstock itself, so if you wind the string up more it'll be fouling on the wood which won't help with tone etc and in the end will make a rut in the wood where the string is fouling. That's not "major damage" but it's undesirable, and the wood fouling on the string will affect the tone even if only a ...


3

I would do it over again, and have about half as many loops on the peg as you have now. See this guide for some more hints.



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