Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

If you are not opposed to using a PC as metronome, you could just use any DAW/Sequencer (Audio recording software like logic, ableton live, cubase etc.) or the excellent guitar pro. I'm sure there are also some free alternatives. This kind of software usually has a way to map out a full music piece including tempo changes. It also has an included metronome ...


2

Classical guitars are designed to be played primarily finger-style (fingerpicking). They generally use nylon strings which do not require near the same amount of tension as steel strings. Because of the lower tension, they do not require a truss rod to compensate for the string tension. Steel string or folk guitars use steel strings and will have an ...


3

Clearly this is in the realm of opinion. The following differences exist: The strings, are farther apart on the classical, and closer together on the steel string. This means that the the finger placement will have to follow a slightly different accuracy. I do not know how I negotiate this difference myself, but I do. Probably best to jump in and do both ...


1

I say choose the instrument you're most comfortable with. Do you like to play classical pieces or is it really about singer/songwriter stuff that you want to play? Personally I really like to listen to the latter but I prefer playing classical/flamenco stuff that is played on a nylon instrument. In addition I occasionally try to write non-classical ...


1

All classical guitars are acoustic. The differences come in when you consider the string material (classical acoustics usually have plastic strings in my experience) and a wider and bigger fretboard.


5

I'd say start now with both of them. It takes a long time to get good at an instrument and there are people that after they spend so much time on an instrument, they don't want to spend so much time again on another one. If you practice both of them, it would take you more time to become good, but you'll be good at two types of guitar rather than one. This ...


4

The point of practising with a metronome is to verify that you are able to keep to a constant meter while playing arbitrary rhythms, or to help you gain that ability if you don't have it. Executing tempo changes such as ritardandos and rubatos requires that you already have that ability, because they should be deliberate choices to deviate from the beat ...


0

Simply consider open strings as the fret 0. And raising a semitone is playing a fret up. 1 2 ... semitones up |----|---| E||-F-|-F#|-G-|-G#|--- e (1st) -||---|---|---|---|--- B (2nd) | -||---|---|---|---|--- G (3rd) | -||---|---|---|---|--- D (4th) |- Strings -||---|---|---|---|--- A (5th) | -||---|---|---|---|--- E (6th) 0 1 2 3 4 ...


2

Each and every fret on a guitar represents one semitone. Thus to move from a C, 1st fret, 2nd string, go up to 2nd fret for C#, and 3rd fret for D (+one tone - or two semitones). When the string is, say, an open E, then moving up one semitone by fretting fret 1, it plays F, and another fret up (fret 2) plays F#. Semitones are generally thought of as the ...


5

Okay, after quite a bit of thought I think I have worked this out. However, before answering, two things: firstly, I have to say, I haven't seen this notation before and it doesn't seem very helpful; secondly, the other answer and comments helped me work this out. Also, it is worth pointing out for other readers, that this passage of music has the ...


0

From the picture, it looks like the top number indicates how many strings are part of the barre, and the lower number indicates the un-barred strings. But if there's really a 2/2 in there, then this can't be the answer.


0

There are several variations but try this one. After some practice it should flow easily. "-" sign means "ligado" or hammer-on/off 5.p - 4.p 3.i 2.m 1.a now comes the jump to A on 2nd string played with i then m, a - , i, m, now jump back and play with "a" finger all 4 remaining notes, like sliding with a finger. Use the same technique on all arpeggios ...


0

I can't address fan-fretted guitars at all, but as far as other fretted string instruments go, the Viola da Gamba, and other Viols (not to be confused with the modern viola), as well as the Lute were some Rennaissance/Baroque instruments that used tied-on frets, made from loops of gut string tied around the neck. Because these frets were only tied, their ...


-1

Pythagorean or "just" intonation is a very different tuning from the 12-tone equal-temperament system. The fanned-fret layout is only capable of 12-tone equal-temperament, as is the standard guitar fret layout. The chief purpose of the fanned-fret system is to provide a longer scale length for lower-pitched strings, and to provide a more even tone and timbre ...


5

Along any single string, one could (in principle) achieve any desired intonation by appropriately placing the frets; fanning implies some desired relationship between the intonation on the different strings -- but it's unclear from your question where you are going with that. Playing a fretless guitar (not very common, but fretless basses and all orchestral ...



Top 50 recent answers are included