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Coda means "tail" in Italian. It's a tail-end part of a longer piece. A coda may be used however a composer wishes: to extend a cadence, to recapitulate some material, even to introduce new material.


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I am afraid I don't have reliable sources discussing modern professionals' editing practices. I can only share what I know from interacting with 2-3 professional pianists who have recorded a number of CDs. From what I gathered, yes, each track is typically the result of mixing a number of takes. Some musicians go to an extreme in literally splicing every ...


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If I remember correctly, there is a table of examples for pianists, for modulating to any key in this period book from the Silent Film era: Musical Accompaniment of Moving Pictures: A Practical Manual for Pianists and Organists by Edith Lang and George West. Modulations were a significant part of the arsenal of silent film accompanists, because they usually ...


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Yes editing takes in some manner has been and still is big part of the production of record music in nearly all musically genres. In the liner notes J.S. Bach Two- And Three- Part Inventions, It is written that Glen Gould confessed to the Columbia manager Ronald Wilford in 1973 "A good session will consist of 2.5 to 3 minutes of music per recording hour ...


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The architecture of Sonata Form is Theme 1 (in the tonic key), Theme 2 (in a contrasting key), Development (mess around freely with themes A and B), Theme A (tonic key), Theme 2 (modified to be also in the tonic key. There may also be an introduction, for which the technical name is "Introduction" :-) And maybe a tailpiece, wrapping up the whole piece, for ...



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