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11

The double leading-tone cadence is certainly not the "single defining characteristic" of Ars Nova. As to the chronology, Philippe de Vitry (born before Machaut, and one of the "inventors" of Ars Nova, to whom the eponymous treatise "ars nova" is ascribed) used double leading-tones in his isorhythmic motets. See, for example, the end of Tuba sacrae/In ...


11

very simple answer... E-Bow I've had one for 30 years, there's nothing quite like it, but it is a technique in & of itself. You can do the standard 'never-ending note' by simply holding it over a string & sliding/hammering up & down the fretboard, but with a little practise you can make it sound like violin/cello spiccato by banging the string ...


9

I actually studied music composition and computer science myself. Great combo! It sounds like what you are really looking for is a formal music composition program, so, first of all, I would say that if this is something that really interests you, and you have the time and the means, you should look into trying to study music through your school, either by ...


9

The top of an acoustic guitar (steel-string or classical) is also referred to as the table. This is the flat piece of wood making up the front of the guitar's body when in playing position (which is a bit confusing!) It is the flat piece of wood which has the sound-hole in it, and which has the bridge stuck to it. This part of the guitar is also called the ...


8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


7

You are correct: I would not be appropriate to cough or clear a throat during a Western classical vocal performance. It is for this reason that many vocalists will carry water out with them and will drink during a break between movements or while resting. If a vocalist absolutely must cough, it is excusable to cough between movements or songs during a ...


7

The important part of a violin sound is a gentle attack at the start of each note. Some players use a volume or swell pedal to achieve this: the note is played just as the pedal swells the volume in. Others use the volume pot on the guitar. Strats and Teles are quite easy to do this on, as the knob is close to where the string is picked. Again, the string is ...


7

It isn't entirely clear from your question whether you're fluent in reading Western music notation and if you're conversant in the (relatively) standardized vocabulary for Western harmony and melody. If not, a first place to begin investigation might be Joseph Straus's Elements of Music. It begins with how to read notes, then moves on to keys, scales, meter, ...


6

I'm in a similar situation. I was classically trained for 13 years, and 6-7 years ago I started playing pop styles. I'm still not excellent at it, but I've come a long way and am generally competent. The biggest difference, as I'm sure you've discovered, is that you can't just play what's on the page (if there even is a page!) and have that be enough, ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...


5

Okay... I'm going to take a stab at this. Note that while some of my answer will be from the perspective of Baroque music, much of it will still apply to some degree throughout the Classical and Romantic eras as well. First of all lets differentiate between the type of composition, and the form of that composition. By type of composition (there may be a ...


5

If you can play the parts on the unwound high E string, you can use a fiddle bow, as Jimmy Page did. Just remember to rosin the bow and use a cheap one as the guitar strings are hard on the horsehair. Another alternative is the Electro Harmonix SuperEgo which will allow you to adjust the attack (Gliss) as well as the sustain ("Speed"); Yet another ...


5

It sounds like you are starting to study harmony and music theory, though. As you progress, things will start to make more sense to you. What makes Shostakovich select such dissonant notes freely? One way of looking at this: composers in a certain period or style eventually start to chafe with the rules of their period, and start to push the envelope. ...


5

Yes they are both triplets. If they were not eigth note triplets, the measure would not add up to 4 quarter notes, but instead 5 quarter notes. Another thing to note is notice how the notes are beamed to make 4 groups. This is to clearly show each beat i.e. each quarter note. As you can see, those notes form one group together equaling 1 quarter note so ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


4

Okay, here's an answer, although it might not be the one you're hoping for... Having listened through to Stravinsky's Mavra following the score a couple of times, I can't find material significantly similar to Blanter's Katyusha either. That doesn't mean, of course, that there is no possibility of a link, but to my ears there is no easily discernible one. ...


4

According to my Italian colleague it means (as Édouard commented): The (=I) soloists (=solisti, irregular plural from solista) from Veneto (i. e. the region, from which Venice is the capital).


4

This is all great advice, but it treats you like a total beginner who doesn't know what to do. You have a huge advantage from your classical training, which is the ability to read. I would look for the most detailed transcriptions of the type of pop music you want to play -- for instance, if you like the Beatles, see the Complete Transcriptions which capture ...


4

With e.g. a Roland GR-55 guitar synth and special pickup GK-3 you can get semi-convincing violin and cello sounds. Using midi you can connect to a e.g. a DAW and likely get vastly superior results through sound libraries. Not the cheapest solution, but probably closest to the real thing. Could be considered cheating though...


4

"Upper position" and "baroque in nature" seem like somewhat contradictory requirements. At any rate, the Bach Cello Suites are not likely to be mastered and put away soon and they are pretty baroque. Bach has the advantage of writing for rather than against the instrument, so while the solo string pieces are really tough, they are also immensively ...


4

I don't know if you mean Alfred's piano books, but those are the ones that I use with my students. If you're not using Alfred's you might have a look. There are some sample PDF pages. Mikrokosmos is a great series, if you like Bartok. Getting students to play the pieces if they don't like Bartok is more trouble than it's worth. Fingering is a flexible ...


4

It would be easy enough to concoct a test that showed the difference between 64 and 128-note polyphony. Maybe harder to tell in practical use. I'd opine that anything over 128 is a gimmick. But be sure you're absolutely clear what the manufacturer (or his advertising copywriter) meams by a "voice". Will hitting a key ever use more than one of them?


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


3

Do you have a gut-string Baroque cello and a Baroque bow, or are you playing a modern steel-string cello with a modern bow? For historically-informed, period-correct playing with a Baroque bow, check out publications by Baroque string instrument educator Martha Bishop, who lives in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. These resources may be worth checking out even if you ...


3

I'm not an advanced pianist by any means, but one difference I've noticed is that classical music is more voice-oriented than pop music. That is, it concerns itself largely with horizontal relations between notes to create multiple independent melody lines, each following voice leading. In pop music, these seem to be much less important relative to the ...


3

Voicing leading 101... Picture a four part choir. In traditional voice leading you have a few basic rules 1) The individual singers need to avoid going into each others ranges. (tenor sings tenor and soprano sings soprano) 2) The bass sings the root, or the bass of the current inversion (you will often see large leaps here) 3) The soprano's melodic line ...


3

Vivaldi's Four Seasons is one of the best and earliest examples in music history of what is called programmatic music or tone poems. The instrumental music was written by Vivaldi to tell a specific story which has accompanying words that are written down, not sung. Vivaldi chose the titles for each movement. Vivaldi wrote four poems, one for each movement, ...


3

Morton Feldman is a major composer in this sort of music. His style was very quite, slow enough to be essentially ametric, and in his later works he become interested in extremes of time - his String Quartet No. 2 is over six hours long. Rothko Chapel is his best-known work. Feldman's does often included some quite strong dissonance, unlike much other ...


3

There are some tricks to polyphony - the same number on 2 different synthesizers/digital pianos might be different 1) a stereo note sometimes requires 2 voices 2) your favorite sound may be "layered" (more than one sound played at the same time). So that piano plus strings sound could eat 2 or more voices 3) there may be background tracks like drums, ...



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