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18

But there are rhythms, harmonies and melodies in nature. When you walk, you establish a nice solid beat. Two beats to the bar, at its most basic level - but by adjusting your gait or the way you count, you can think of it as four beats, or three, or as many as you like. Skipping brings in different rhythms. The musical intervals that make up melodies are ...


13

Some audience members will be familiar with the piece. It is also possible to pick up visual body language cues from the performers (if they are continuing to ignore the audience after finishing a movement, that's a good sign that there is more to come). But more than all of this, is the fact that the performance programs (handed out by ushers or available ...


10

This is a positive thing. Studies have shown the positive effect music has on unborn babies, see: Whitwell, Giselle E. "The importance of prenatal sound and music." Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health 13 (1999): 255-262. http://intraspec.ca/music.pdf


9

Just to expand on Pat's answer, there is a figured bass symbols for all type of inversion including root position. The picture above shows the complete figured bass symbol and how it will be denoted in analysis. As you can see root position triads and 7th chords have their own complete figured bass symbols, but reduce drastically because how common they ...


8

When asked about how "masterworks" are created, Nadia Boulanger, a French composition pedagogue during the 20th century, had this to say: "I can tell whether a piece is well-made or not, and I believe that there are conditions without which masterpieces cannot be achieved, but I also believe that what defines a masterpiece cannot be pinned down. I ...


7

My music theory book best put the definition of texture as "The way melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic are woven together in a composition." By this definition the texture of a piece is a combination of all the pieces that make up music, but looking at them all together instead of separately. A composer will use each of these to define their music so the ...


6

There is no right answer on this and at best you will have several subjective answers to review but here are my suggestions. Your idea of hearing your guitar being tuned is actually a very good idea since it puts the viewer in the space of seeing things being set up and hearing things set up too. You can make it sound wonderful and enchanting, use your ...


6

Just like in the visual arts, this ability comes with development of the imagination. Imagination can work with any of the senses. Perfumers imagine scents. Chefs imagine tastes and textures and aromas. Musicians imagine music. The time element is the only real difference between audile imagination (or audiation), and these other, more static images. One ...


6

It depends. For most music the answer is no, since this amounts to transcribing, which is still most accurately done by humans. There exist libraries of Parson's codes for existing known themes and songs. For a sound file that consists of a single melody line in isolation, this becomes much more practical. All there is to do is generate an FFT for each ...


5

Simple. Wait for others to clap first. If the applause is sporadic and accompanied by embarrassed looks from one audience member to the other... don't join in the applause. If the applause is confident, join in! It is customary to applaud only after the completion of an entire work. The audience knows when the work is over by reading the program and by ...


5

The key signature should always fit nicely inside the staff for any key and any clef and are defined and standardized so it all looks the same no matter what piece you play. Putting the F# on the bottom line will put the C# on a ledger line or it will break the common pattern. This site shows what the standard key signatures for many diffrent keys on bass, ...


5

I like to think about dolce as applied to character, and cantabile as applied to articulation. The dolce instruction gives you an idea more linked to the character, to a feeling that your playing might suggest. This reflects directly into the dynamics of the piece you are playing, although not strictly as bound to the "speed vs. strength" matter as it ...


5

What I Think Music isn't some kind of mystical half-random thing that is beyond all understanding; it has its rules and regulations --and in some ways, more structural restrictions than other art forms. It can and usually should be somewhat predictable and, really, there are only a few combinations of rhythms out there --it's all about how you put them ...


5

They are figured bass numbers, as used under bass lines in (primarily) the Baroque era to indicate harmonic content to be improvised by continuo players such as the harpsichordist. The numbers refer to the diatonic intervals above the bass. Look at your 6/4 example above. The two distinct notes above the bass note are a sixth and a 4th above, hence 6/4. This ...


5

Music21 is a musicology software developed at MIT and includes within it a large corpus of western classical, and other, music. From their website: Music21 is a set of tools for helping scholars and other active listeners answer questions about music quickly and simply. If you’ve ever asked yourself a question like, “I wonder how often Bach does that” ...


5

I think that the differences you mentioned have more to do with the size of the groups involved than their preference for classical or rock music. Also, I'm willing to wager that there is as much diversity in terms of goals among members of the same category (rock or classical) as there is between the two. You mentioned orchestral music, but that is only a ...


4

As has been said, music probably originated from imitation of the rhythms of walking, breathing, the melodies of speaking, bird song, etc. etc. Nowadays a lot of music is quite far from that. It's been abstracted and certain laws of music have been found. For example notes close to each other (in any way, like by frequency, time, timbre...) sound like they ...


4

It is true that there is no "right" answer to this as it depends on your own aesthetic and decision, but we can offer different ideas from which you can choose. Here are some ideas: Op.60 No.2 is in C major (the relative major of A minor) and would lead nicely harmonically into No.5 while gently emphasizing the "minor mood." In A minor, gently strum ...


3

Well, it's always sensible to attempt a piano piece. It's not like attempting to skydive without sufficient training to make it successfully to the ground, after all. That said, after looking at the repertoire requirements for the top ABRSM grade, grade 8, you would have to be well beyond this stuff to be able to play the Emperor with any degree of ...


3

I got an answer to this question after talking to a few musicians. The auxiliary note is determined by the melodic context. For example, in D major, an auxiliary F and D should be raised. Now, the trick is that there may very well be modulations so, for example, a piece starting in D major could turn into B minor, in which case the 7th (A) will likely be ...


3

The earliest version I can think of is Bach's Musikalisches Opfer which is a series of canons Bach composed after given a theme by the King. The music can be played forwards and backwards simultaneously harmoniously in various ways (refer to the video). I also remember reading a score of Mozart's violin duet piece called "The Mirror". To play this piece ...


2

Unless you're a professional concert pianist, go with digital. I've played on old uprights all my life, then I got me a new Yamaha DGX 650, hooked up a nice monitor with subwoofer- and it's like heaven. Sounds 10x better than my old upright. I can record to usb for playback, use head phones. I'm not one that cares about whether or not it feels just like a ...


2

A major 9th double stop is not possible using just the four fingers in conventional position -- in that case the maximum double stop would be a minor seventh (or a major seventh with an extension). However, it is possible using an extended thumb position, especially if the notes are high (e.g. the lower note around an octave above the string on which it's ...


2

I am a computer programmer and an electronic music artist, so I have a different view of music from what everyone described here. Writing a song is a lot like writing a program for me. When writing a computer program, I start out knowing what I want the program to do and having to decide how I want to get it to do that. The best way to do this is to think ...


2

It's thought that Beethoven would think up a sentence or phrase, write notes that matched the rhythm and inflection, and use that as a motif for a piece. He never told anyone what the phrase was, with two exceptions where he printed it in the published music: "Le - be - wohl" in the sonata for piano opus 81a, and "Muss es sein? Es muss sein!" in a string ...


2

Adding an example to jjmusicnotes' great answer: a ghost "tenor" (that is the third voice from the top) happens in many cases where two flutes or even a flute and a clarinet play a minor third apart in the range near the top of the treble clef staff and create a difference tone of 2*frequency(lower) - frequency(upper) which is also approximately minor third ...


2

As you mentioned in your question, there is little documentation about this phenomenon. Therefore I will preface my answer by saying that it (my answer) is speculation based from what knowledge I have of acoustics, historical performance practice, and literature. I am not aware of any piece of music that was conceived with the intention of being ...


2

Starting from C and going up, there's the standard 1/2 3 1 3 1 2 3 1 3 1 3 1 2. This is usually enough. With practice it should work for that particular run in Beethoven. The trick to make things faster is to use longer groupings. With the above fingering most groups are (1 3) and some are (1 2 3). So, let's use (1 2 3) and (1 2 3 4) instead. Starting from ...


2

To be simple one can say: Variation: one musical theme/melodic material that already has been presented is the object of the variations. Variations of that material (one already existing material/melody/theme). Variations normally don't change the melody content neither interrupt/cut pieces out of the original material, but can be very creative with all ...


2

This is a rough translation of this entry. You should read the whole of it if you understand french, this is a complete guide to Opera / Classical Music concerts, of what to expect during the performance and what is generally expected from the audience. When should I applaud? a) Concert (symphonic music, chamber orchestra, etc.) : It is customary not to ...



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