Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You mean "string" rather than "chord" I presume, and it's more or less in "fingerpicking style" that one tends to use one finger per string. In classical style however, you more often than not alternate between index and middle finger when playing several notes on one string. It's usually bad technique to use the same finger repeatedly on one string since ...


2

There are some tricks to polyphony - the same number on 2 different synthesizers/digital pianos might be different 1) a stereo note sometimes requires 2 voices 2) your favorite sound may be "layered" (more than one sound played at the same time). So that piano plus strings sound could eat 2 or more voices 3) there may be background tracks like drums, ...


3

It would be easy enough to concoct a test that showed the difference between 64 and 128-note polyphony. Maybe harder to tell in practical use. I'd opine that anything over 128 is a gimmick. But be sure you're absolutely clear what the manufacturer (or his advertising copywriter) meams by a "voice". Will hitting a key ever use more than one of them?


4

It sounds like you are starting to study harmony and music theory, though. As you progress, things will start to make more sense to you. What makes Shostakovich select such dissonant notes freely? One way of looking at this: composers in a certain period or style eventually start to chafe with the rules of their period, and start to push the envelope. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included