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1

The architecture of Sonata Form is Theme 1 (in the tonic key), Theme 2 (in a contrasting key), Development (mess around freely with themes A and B), Theme A (tonic key), Theme 2 (modified to be also in the tonic key. There may also be an introduction, for which the technical name is "Introduction" :-) And maybe a tailpiece, wrapping up the whole piece, for ...


2

Coda means "tail" in Italian. It's a tail-end part of a longer piece. A coda may be used however a composer wishes: to extend a cadence, to recapitulate some material, even to introduce new material.


0

Normally it goes after a repeat with dal segno sign or to coda, it's a musical term in Italian it means go to the sign, play from the sign but don't repeat as you finished before there is a special ending or cadence to bring the music to a close. That ending is called in music nomenclature coda.


0

You can buy lectures from Prof. Robert Greenberg he has a whole course on the life, history, and work of Bach. Prof. Greenberg teaches in Berkeley. You can get the courses on the Great courses website


0

The Bach Network UK site has knowledgeable articles on Bach. This one is a nice introductory reading. The subject of your essay is especially difficult because Bach was not an innovator. In addition, music theory at that time was not as clear and usable as it is today. Theoretical books about counterpoint, such as Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum (1725), were ...


5

I would rely on Christoph Wolff's excellent Johann Sebastian Bach. The Learned Musician (published 2001), which features an entire chapter about Bach's great interest for previous and contemporary composers, and also his Bach: Essays on his Life and Works. You should probably focus on the German "fathers" of Bach's keyboard style (other Bachs, Pachelbel ...


-1

You will have to play "Portato" .Portato is also known as articulated legato (Blood 2012).It is a bowing technique for stringed instruments (Anon. 2001), in which successive notes are gently re-articulated while being joined under a single continuing bow stroke. It achieves a kind of pulsation or undulation, rather than separating the notes. It has been ...


5

Yes. The slur just indicates that the note should touch the preceding note, but it's still played on time and ended according to the staccato dot. Basically, a slur does not change the last note it reaches but only the notes before it.


1

Ragtime can be considered as one of the precursors to boogie woogie. Ragtime itself came initially from rearranging marches by the likes of Sousa (considered part of the classical tradition) for piano whilst adding in polyrhythms. The rhythmic changes are in some part down to the limitations of piano orchestration as opposed to marching band orchestration ...


4

I don't know how much the boogie players were classically trained on average, but to answer the question "Is there anything in the pre-20th century classical canon that resembles the boogie-woogie bass line" the Alberti Bass, as pointed out by Laurance Payne, sure comes to mind. But I would add a number of pieces by Bach. Take for example the second prelude ...


17

Beethoven got close in the final movement of his last piano sonata (the relevant part is from 0:30 to the end of the video)


3

I suppose you could draw a comparison with the Alberti Bass. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass


1

Thanks to the comment by alephzero, we can figure the whole thing out easily. The notation rules are that any expression, technique, or instruction text starts in the music where the start of the above appears. This is also how notation software works. If you were to start execution at the end of the instruction then the position in the music would depend ...


-2

This is a little imprecise but a general rule of thumb is you start from the bar line nearest to the marking and continue either to another dynamic marking or the next double bar line or end-repeat bar line. This seems to be what most other musicians do subconsciously and you don't really lose anything.


1

A crescendo applies until contradiction, either up to a decrescendo (then it remains unclear, which level to achieve) or to an absolute volume indication. If I see correctly, in the bar below yours marked with (1) the seems to be a piano marking directly beneath the octave transposition. Assuming, that (due to the metronome marking in the upper left) there ...


1

The crescendo starts where the word "cresc." is. It SHOULD lead to an explicit dynamic, and unless very short should be extended with a dotted line to indicate the extent. The composer here is being rather imprecise in indicating what he wants.


1

Cresc., or crescendo, means getting gradually louder than it has been. It starts where your 2 is. It'll continue getting louder until there's another sign, maybe an f or ff, at which point, the volume will level out until another sign is shown. It's shown in the bar marked 1, in anticipation for the start of the next bar, although with a gradual cresc. it ...



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