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14

I'd definitely recommend a metronome, especially when the rythms are trickier. I basically use it for these types of exercises: the ones with difficult rythms, and the ones where the point is to build up velocity. The latter ones, I use a metronome to keep in check, because the main mistake in virtuosity exercises is to want to go too fast too soon and then ...


9

The portion of Amadeus to which you refer is unfortunately a rather accurate depiction of a practice that has thankfully passed, that of using pounding large staff on stage to keep time. Jean-Baptiste Lully was literally an unfortunate casualty of this practice. As for Rubato, the Harvard Dictionary of Music offers two related definitions. The main ...


9

The obvious shortcoming is that after we leave the classical period, music and tonality becomes too complex for Roman numeral analysis to be completely useful. So, we don't need to mention 9th chords or jazz 7ths and the like, and I believe you understand that already from the question. For classical music, Roman numeral analysis is the most widely accepted ...


8

A sense of time varies from person to person. Some people have an acute sense of time and have less need for a metronome, while others may struggle with time. So the use of a metronome is relative to your personal sense of time. But even good time keepers will sometimes devote themselves to a steady regimen of metronome exercises in the spirit of improving ...


7

Well, it's got all the same notes, right? People have been updating the timbres of classic works for centuries. Take Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, for example. That was originally intended to be played on well-tempered clavichords and harpsichords, but nowadays keyboardists perform it on equal-tempered (not the same thing!) harpsichords, pianos, and even ...


5

In order to answer your question, the question itself needs to be modified. To correct your thought, the Romantic Period did not occur specifically during Beethoven's lifetime, so it could therefore not have happened during his "middle" period. It is important to understand that when talking about labeling a period of music is to label a zeitgeist of ...


5

The only thing that I have found difficult to describe in Roman Numerals is 9th and higher chords in inversions. For example, a C9 chord with the G in the bass would be described in lead sheet notation as C9/G but my theory class never really came up with a consistent way to describe inversions beyond 7ths. I sadly don't have any texts or examples beyond ...


5

A metronome is the best tool for learning a new rhythm (besides a good piano teacher). I would highly recommend you use a metronome when learning complex rhythms. You should not, however, soley depend upon the metronome to do the work for you. I am not a piano teacher or expert, but these are my suggestions: First, try playing the piece slowly without the ...


4

The other answers (so far) seem to be focused on the sound you'd produce: whether you can replicate the sound of a classical guitar with an electric and whether it's even necessary to do so. I think these are interesting questions, but miss an important point: playing technique. A classical guitar uses nylon strings with an extremely wide string spacing. ...


4

These are in fact all different. The D and G and bars 6 and 8 are in square brackets by the editor to indicate that they should be re-attacked, since the preceding note is the same. Bar 8 is not a trill. It should be played as two eighth notes G and F. Bar 12 is a normal trill where its first note (F#) was not the last one played, so no need to indicate it ...


3

The defining point lies somewhere between the Third Symphony and the Fifth Symphony. In particular, I would argue that it's the Fourth Piano Concerto where Beethoven makes the most radical break from Classical to Romantic music, inasmuch as the harmonic freedom exploited in late Mozart and in Beethoven's earlier works is combined with breaking structural ...


3

In counterpoint, "chords" are incidental - the result of proper voice-leading rules and carefully controlled dissonance. What matters more is whether or not all of the intervals are consonant, and if they are not, how you are controlling the dissonance (whether or not it is being handled appropriately.) Because the rules are the way they are, then lend ...


3

Are you familiar with the concepts of "early music" and "historically-informed performance"? General background rather than a specific answer: I'm not a keyboardist or instrumentalist, but I work as a volunteer business person with a Baroque orchestra composed of career specialists in early music and historically-informed performance. All I can say is that ...


3

Here is an awesome 10-minute instructional video on Classical-period piano playing from Matthew Bengtson. It covers the use of the sustain pedal and many other aspects. He is using an actual fortepiano of a similar model to the ones that Mozart and Beethoven used.


3

To answer your question: "Do the pedals completely bastardize the sound the composers intended?" is not as much as playing on the wrong instrument does. :-) The piano Mozart, Beethoven and their contemporaries would have played would have been a Fortepiano. The modern piano as we know it (named Pianoforte), came a bit later. he Fortepiano is a much quieter ...


3

Much of Bach's education in composition came from him making hand copies of many musical scores, as music was not mass-printed at the time. Having mastered the Baroque notions of counterpoint and developing motives, combined with his known skill at improvising in the style, why would he seek to give up mastery of a style to be mediocre at a new one? As to ...


3

It seems that available instrumentists (more than instruments) were key as well as a figure of the composer as an individualistic and total master of the music he writes. The development of cellists' virtuosity (such as Joseph Franz Weigl, friend of Haydn, Josef Fiala, Josef Reicha (friend of Mozart) and later the Duport brothers and Romberg) has been ...


2

It's just a change in style, like the way blues and rock bands changed from having guitars only in the background to having guitars up front. The basso continuo was a standardized sort of accompaniment, typically given a bass line and chord symbols only and filing in the chords ad libitum. J.S. Bach was already beginning to exert more control, writing ...


2

It certainly is possible to do so, with some minor technique modification. One of the worlds best classical guitarists, John Williams famously did this during his period with the band 'Sky' back in the early 80's. If you get the chance, check out his album 'Sky2' where he plays several classical pieces with an electric. To get them to sound the same, you ...


2

About using a metronome when studying a piece with tempo variations Using the metronome is especially useful when studying Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt or Scriabine. You should be able to play them in straight tempo, and the metronome can help you do that. When this is achieved, you can use it to train for a given acceleration or deceleration. It is often ...


2

Let me add my US $0.02. Roman numeral analysis is very good for studying a piece of music and figuring out the harmonic progression. However, if all you want to do is sight-read and play the music on your instrument, it's more efficient to name chords by their letter name because it's easier to read and play. Let me give a very simple example. If you are ...


2

One piece which is often mentioned is Beethoven's 3rd symphony. I don't think harmony alone could be a defining factor. Bach already has some pretty wild stuff. There's an extremely dissonant chord-progression piece (or section of a piece) by him, but I don't remember what it is (it's not the chromatic fantasie and fugue).


1

These recommendations assume that it took you between 2 and 6 months to learn each of the pieces you've mentioned. You're definitely already in the intermediate stage and should be congratulated on your progress! Baroque: Try a selection from one of the suites by Handel. Maybe the Allemande, Allegro or Aria from the Suite in G major HWV 441, or the ...


1

I agree with much of the answers. For me they are great but yes it can get tricky with modern key changes, but if you think of modulations as phrases that arrive at a goal (unless abruptly jumping right into a new key with out prep) then thinking in terms of common harmonic patterns into the new goal key as I can be useful. Let's say I'm in Cmajor and now ...


1

I would say that metronome work is most useful at the "middle" stage of learning a piece. You will probably want to start learning a difficult piece without the metronome, not worrying about being out of rhythm too much. Once you know the notes, try working up slowly with the metronome. Some pieces (or parts of pieces), especially those of the Romantic ...


1

If you're playing classical music, you need to remember that tempo is inherently flexible, and learning to play with a metronome isn't going to help with that. It definitely is hard to play a rit. or an accel. with a metronome going. A metronome is an invaluable tool, but it shouldn't be overused. It is most useful if someone (usually your teacher) says ...


1

If you ever wish to play in a band or record a multi-track piece, you will need to keep in sync with someone else's rhythm while you're playing. In a band, typically the drummer sets the beat. Playing with a metronome should help with this, although it's not the same since a drummer can deliberately speed up or slow down. When recording, sometimes musicians ...


1

Short answer: Yes Long answer: Yes, you can. I do it a lot, when I want to play some classical for a slight(?) change from heavy metal riffs without switching guitars. I'm using a Line 6 Spyder IV 15 amp, and the 'Clean' preset sounds just like my classical guitar. Other amps may vary, but even if it only has overdrive settings, if you turn the drive all ...



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