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It looks like the strange Clefs you have provided are the result of a few musical situations which up until relatively recently, were somewhat confusing to formally notate, thus unusual clef suggestions in the late 19th through the early to mid 20th centuries. Essentially, there are a few categories of instruments which transpose, usually down by an octave ...


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Very interesting diagram. I hadn't ever seen the use of the "C-clef" to mark the pitch C in a space, rather than on a line. However, as @Old John points to in his comment, the Wikipedia page about clefs deals with just such a clef. At the top of the page this clef is first hinted at: Only one clef that references a note in a space rather than on a line ...


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You have not exactly explained where you found this example: in Gardner Read's book (page 55) there is an example of the upper clef (G clef with funny bracket), which he explains as one form of the clef for a tenor part, meaning G clef 8vb (and not the same as the "tenor clef", which is a C clef). I can't see this particular combination of two staves. On ...


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My best guess as to the intention of this notation would be that the entire grand staff is being transposed down an octave. As I'm sure you know, the treble clef on its own places C5 on the third space. The C clef used for alto/tenor clef is meant to be centered upon C4, or middle C. So, the fact that a C clef is centered upon the third space of the upper ...


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When I showed a music teacher of mine the Alto-Tenor clef as originally used in conjunction with Treble clef symbol, the moment he saw it, in an instant, he said to remove the Treble Clef symbol, and use the two staves as a Contra Basso/Alto-Tenor grand staff for use by bass players playing five and six string basses.



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