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Actually I think that at least in one respect your question starts at the wrong end: this is no property of the instrument, but a convention of how it is notated. Double bass and contrabassoon sound an octave lower than they are notated. The notation is already in the bass clef, so while one could use ( impracticable many ledger lines or) a transposing ...


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In practice there is little difference between using an octave clef and a normal clef for these "octave-transposing" instruments. An instrumentalist playing these instruments need not even think about the fact that the music sounds in a different octave to that written; although, of course, players and composers/arrangers should know that the sounding pitch ...


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It's down to the range of the instrument compared with the range of the clefs. With guitar, the lowest note is traditionally an E. This E would come on the 1st ledger line below the bass clef. Putting the open top string on the treble clef stave,bottom line. That's before we go to the rest of the notes up that string. Playing on two staves isn't easy (ask a ...


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If one wants to use staff association as a strong hand indication while retaining rhythmically helpful grouping, one can use notation like the following:


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Orchestral scores (as noted already) are usually 1-2 / 3-4, both in G (treble) clef, sounding a P5 lower than notated. Bass clef is not common, but neither is it rare. One thing to be careful of: there was an old custom of bass clef horn sounding a P4 higher than notated. Given that the whole idea of going to bass clef is to avoid excessive ledger lines ...



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