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13

Listen, listen, listen to lots of new kinds of music. Regularly. Not just your style or your favorites. Don't just listen. Marinate. Challenge yourself. It'll be tough initially, and it may not hold your attention, but the exercise does pay off. You'll start to hear things "out of the box" that you didn't before and you'll have fresher perspectives on your ...


10

Just a few ideas: A keyboard instrument provides a lot more freedom in terms of the number of notes that can be sounded together and the distance between them. It's difficult on a guitar to play a fluidly moving bassline and a chord pattern two octaves above; it's trivial on a piano. The sustain mechanism of a piano allows for all notes to sustain at once; ...


8

This is going to sound rather trite, but… Put the gear away & write a song on the piano. You're suffering from a modern dilemma - Instant Gratification Syndrome. If it doesn't immediately make your music for you, you get bored. You have the gear, you want it to 'do something for you'. It's not going to happen. …alternatively - find a noise, any ...


7

You know what used to work for me? Take the chords off a popular song and write to those. Or take the rhythm of a melody and see how it works with other chords - maybe in another mode. You know the Mickey Mouse March? Dam-dadam, dam-dadam, dam-dadam-dadam? Nice, now find an interesting sequence of chords. In minor, even. Now try to come up (in your ...


7

I'm reminded of how the sci-fi author, Lois McMaster Bujold, keeps her books moving along: "What's the worst thing that can happen to the protagonist now?" You, of course, don't want to write the worst thing, but you do want something that will a) give you a hook to work with, and b) keep the song hopping, and that means a very similar way of working. The ...


6

Casey's answer is fundamental and should be thoroughly understood. When you're ready to go farther afield, you can use other closely-related minor 7th chords. Consider this chord progression: I-I7-IV-V7-I. The I7 is a "secondary dominant", the "V7 of the IV" chord. It gives a stronger feeling of "fourness" to the IV chord. Now, if you wanted to more ...


6

You can use V-I, although you need to prep it well. A not-unusual formula is to end with a standard Phrygian cadence (♭vii6-I), and then close it off with V-I or viiᵒ-I (often over over a tonic pedal). Also, less conventional, but using a formula that actually arose from the Phrygian cadence, is to use an augmented sixth as your dominant. (I've closed off a ...


4

Each mode has it's own unique harmony associated with it and Phrygian is no different. The most notable thing about Phrygian harmony is the II chord which in E Phrygian is F. It's really strong and it is very commonly borrowed and used as what is known as a Neapolitan chord. You would want your chord progression to utilize the II chord like a dominant since ...


4

There really isn't a set of rules a composer/songwriter is bound by. Modulation has a certain effect like anything else at times may be desired and at others may be undesired. It is up to the composer/songwriter to decide if it will improve the song itself or not. The are many reasons why or why not to use and effect or technique and modulation is no ...


4

Unfortunately, the tools are not the key. E.g. Venetian Snares started out with a couple of ghettoblasters and low grade samplers. The first instruments of most musicians were low budget. Just cause you buy the best art equipment available, does not mean that you can paint. That's not to say all is lost for you, I can't possibly know that. But one must ...


4

The best way is for you to practice a bunch of simple songs - folk tunes, Christmas carols, children's music - learning the chords to these songs. This will train your ear as to the appropriate ways of using chords. There is no software which will add chords to a tune because for any particular melody different chord progressions can be used, it's partly ...


4

Minor seventh chords can typically be substituted whenever adding a diatonic 7th (the 7th that is within the current key) to a minor triad leads to a minor seventh. In a major key, this occurs for ii7, iii7 and vi7. In a minor key, this occurs for i7, vi7 and v7. So for instance, if you have a chord progression, like I-iii-vi-ii-V, you could add 7th to ...


4

Some notes sound good together. This is an example of what we call consonance. Some notes do not sound good together. We call that dissonance. In simple terms, certain notes blend well together because of the way the sonic frequencies merge together and complement one another. Our brains will instinctively have a desire to gravitate towards complementary ...


4

Use a random number generator to come up with new chord progressions. If you play guitar, put your fingers at random spots on the fretboard and see what happens. If you play piano, put your fingers on random keys and see what happens. Listen to your favorite song backwards. Listen to your least favorite song backwards. Write out the sheet music for one ...


4

I am surprised this hasn't been a response yet... STOP Put your instrument down and take a break. Go for a walk and collect yourself. How a musician spends his time away from his instrument is equally as important as how he does with it in front of him. Sometimes you can listen to too much music. A couple days without playing or listening to music can be ...


3

The others are spot on in saying that learning some music theory is the best way to be good at this, but I think I can help you with a simple technique on piano to find some chords that work together. I should stress that this is method will limit the chords available to you, and limit you to just a few keys, but limiting yourself can be great for ...


3

Okay, you, a piano, and some nursery rhyme that does not have a melody associated with it. Do it wrong, but make yourself set it to music. No one will ever have to hear it. If that sounds weird, look at an old folk tune like Go Tell Aunt Rhodie. Look at a hymn, like When I Survey the Wondrous Cross. (NO! I am not suggesting you take up farming or religion. ...


3

but is reading the bass clef necessary? Rhythm seems rather useless also. Cough, cough. In baroque times, accompaniment was written down by writing down the bass line and rhythm and putting numbers for the type of chord/harmony to be played above the bass line. While the numbers are gone these days and replaced by explicitly writing out the right hand, ...


3

I am going to answer your "in short" "how do I do notes?" with a much more simplistic approach - one that works for me when I compose melodies for songs I write lyrics for. Start by deciding what key you want to use. Your choice of key could be influenced by the feel you want to create. Many composers will use major keys for happy songs, minor keys for ...


3

I agree largely with the other posted answer, but from the perspective of someone who has messed around with electronic music to at least a modest degree. I have a lot of VST synthesizers (enough that I definitely stay directionless most of the time) but when I feel inspired to write . . . 'something' . . .I find it very helpful to start extremely simple. ...


3

How would you find a collection of notes that worked, that didn't just sound like a kid poking a piano? That's just it. My field is slightly different (classical), but the way I force inspiration is roughly equivalent to "poking a piano". I have never actually worked at a piano (not even for piano pieces - I check them when I'm done), but the method is ...


3

I don't mean which instrument they are played on I think the instrument is a big part of it. Pianos can play way more notes at a time. Stomp the hold pedal and you can play a lot more strings than a guitar player can. The piano has a full 88 notes of range. It takes 2 or 3 guitars to cover A0 .. C8. The guitar lets you bend notes, and fiddle with ...


3

If your question is about coming up with good melodies, then I think there are a few starters. Out of the 12 notes in an octave, any permutation and combination of notes can generate music. However, there are pre-defines scales(in western) or Ragas(in indian classical) that define a specific set of notes. If you limit yourselves to those notes, then there ...


3

Analyze what you do. Write it down. What tempos are you used to? What rhythmic patterns do you use the most? Do you tend to repeat the same intervals? Take those melodies that made you feel repetitive. Why are they similar? You will find out exactly what your clichés are. They probably come from your influences. These similar lines come out of you musical ...


3

Find a collaborator. Even if it's just temporary. They will have a different perspective. Work in a different genre. Listen to really different music from what you're used to (such as music from the Middle East, folk music from Bulgaria or Finland, Indian music - stuff that doesn't use the 12-tone scale or 4/4 rythms)


3

TLDR; Listen to new music, play in new keys, try to emulate other styles/genres, choose new chord progressions and approach your writing from a different perspective, ie, which instrument you write on, both for accompaniment and melody. What you are experiencing is entirely normal. As humans we have managed to survive and evolve due to our recognition of ...


2

FLAC has nothing to do with FL Studio. Logic Pro X does not export to FLAC, either, for example. Generally an in-between program (possibly a mastering program) is used for such conversion. Any sequencer, including FL Studio can export to an uncompressed format such as WAV or AIFF, which are native, uncompressed formats. This is the highest possible ...


2

I have never used Fl Studio, but the wikipedia article has a list of notable users and, although I haven't heard any of their music (not trying to dismiss them - I'm probably just not their audience), they (or most of them) seem to have established and successful careers. It doesn't necessarily mean that they used just Fl Studio for all their music, but I'm ...


2

For what it's worth; I've found this mode to work best in lead lines.. not necessarily in composing harmony around an actual "key" based off it. It has some odd chords; the V chord is Diminished; so V-I sounds odd (Diminished doesn't want to "go" that way). It makes convincing music somewhat difficult. But playing an E Phrygian scale over an E minor chord ...


2

So something that has helped me when i have needed to compose things for clients is to refine what the thought is that needs to be communicated like you would do when you are writing copy. Pare it down to one musical thought and then embellish. Another thing that helps when you're stuck is to do something thats obviously wrong. THat at least confirms what ...



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