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9

The rules about parallal octaves only apply when writing Bach chorale-type harmony where the aim is rich harmony with no one part "sticking out" disproportionately. Because this is often the first type of harmony we are taught to write, we can fall into the trap of thinking it's the ONLY way of doing it! Orchestration is all about doubling lines, often in ...


6

I stand with Shevliaskovic on this: You can indeed do what ever you want. Taking your question as written, that is the exact correct response. However, I believe that this is what you really wanted to know: It is true that G Major key has a D Major chord as the dominant (fifth chord of the key), and that D Major key has G Major chord as the sub-dominant ...


6

First of all, since this is your composition, you can do whatever you want. Unless you're going for something very specific, like you want to write your song in a certain style, there are no limits. Go nuts. In your example, I assume you're in the G major key, and you have a D major chord, right? If this is the case, then yes you can freely use the D ...


5

Structurally ragtime harmony is pretty much classical tonal harmony, but there are of course some idiomatic specificities that give ragtime its characteristic sound. One progression very characteristic of ragtime is the so called... ragtime progression (although it was used before, even in classical music, it was mostly popularized in ragtime). It's made ...


3

Adding further to the two existing answers, the notes of MODES will fit slightly better than the notes of each major scale. On chord G, obviously, the G scale notes fit best. Still in the KEY of G, but on a D chord, the notes of D Mixolydian are a (slightly) better fit, and on a C chord, the notes from C Lydian likewise. So, what's happening is that on ...


3

The only time you shouldn't have parallel octaves is when you are voice leading and want two parts to be completely independent. The reason why you wouldn't use it is that it makes two voices that should be independent sound as one. It's used very, very frequently as doubling a line by octave is very effective at making it stand out. For example in Day ...


3

William Sethares, creator of "xenotality" and "exotonality," wrote a book called Tuning, Timbre, Spectrum, Scale. According to Dave Benson in Music: A Mathematical Offering p. 490: The basic thesis of this book is the idea, first put forward by John Pierce, that the harmonic spectrum or timbre of an instrument determines the most appropriate scales ...


2

The word "sonata" may refer to different things. In the Baroque period a sonata was just an instrumental piece (like Scarlatti's sonatas). I suppose, though, that the OP may be referring to the term applied to the classical period, in which case it can have two different, although related, meanings: 1) The sonata-allegro form, usually simply abbreviated ...


2

Anything can inspire creation of mathematical systems expressed in music. However, whether the connection is actually less tenuous than any kind of voodoo is a different question. In the manner you pose the question, I don't think that it can be answered positively with an approach reasonably called justifiable. One obvious problem here is that Fourier ...


2

Believe it or not what you are experiencing is very common and often done unconsciously without you even realizing what you are doing. Chord progressions cannot be copyrighted because there are only a certain number of common chords that fit in a given key. You might have seen the Axis of Awesome video where they demonstrate that the same chord progression ...


2

C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


2

Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


2

I'm going to tell you what I observe in very layman's terms without music theory terms. Let's for simplicity we're in the key of C. A lot of them have this progression: (F F#° or Ab7 /) C/G A7 D7 G7 C especially towards the end of a section. A possible "verse" (very common) is C / / / | / / / / | F / / / | C / / / C / G/B / | Am / Am7/G / | D7 / / / | G ...


2

This is a bit difficult to answer, since one person's aggressive might very well be another's bombastic, but see if any of these techniques strike your fancy: Liberal usage of dissonance and/or nonharmonic tones Instead of just rhythmic percussion/brass, try interspersing more ongoing rhythmic lines (or even pure polyrhythms) throughout all of the ...


1

My first suggestion would be to slow down the music to half speed, if you haven't tried that already. You can do that with a YouTube video by clicking on the settings gear icon and selecting the speed. It might make certain passages a little clearer to hear what note is being played when. For instance, I'm noticing that the first note is probably a pickup ...


1

A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...


1

In popular music, the most common chord positions are the root and the second inversion. First-inversion chords tend to sound rhythmically "weak". In any case, doubling the third of a major chord between the bass and treble is probably not a good idea, unless you really want that sound for some reason. Try it, and some alternatives, and use your ears! If ...


1

The range for male falsetto tends to be that of alto. A few soloists might dip into mezzosoprano ranges, but alto is quite more common. One reason is that for a usable falsetto range, you are better off with a deeper chest voice and that limits the higher range. If you want your singer to stay solidly in falsetto, you'll still want to avoid low alto range ...


1

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? It's not common, but there is precedent: "We Do What We Can" by Sheryl Crow (track #10 from her debut album) "Fool in the Rain" by Led Zeppelin I could probably think of a few others, but it's getting ...


1

You mention "...showcase a vocal range" -- sometimes it's out of necessity rather than showcasing. Two examples I can think of offhand include: Islands in the Stream as recorded by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. Kenny has the vocal lead for the first verse and chorus (in C major), but then the song modulates two whole tones lower (A♭ major) so that Dolly ...



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