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13

If you mean can one compose a melody using notes that are not defined in any recognized form of musical notation - then the answer is certainly! And if you compose a musical work that uses tones that are not defined in say 12 Tone Equal Temperament or other common tuning or notation system, there is no universally accepted way to transcribe those tones ...


11

It could be argued that any digital recording of the melody in question is a notation of that particular performance: It's something that can be followed to reproduce the original performance. It can be written down (any digital recording is made of bits that can be encoded as ink on paper, if need be). Anyone with the right training and equipment can use ...


10

But what about modern day tonal music? I have played around on my piano with chord progressions that break all of those "rules" and if you'll forgive me for taking the risk of sounding cocky, I sound amazing! I daresay you do! However, while you may be breaking those rules, you're probably obeying newer ones. As time moves forward, more styles are ...


10

Sure. Here are some examples of scores by John Cage, Steve Reich, Brian Eno, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Cornelius Cardew - all recognized "mainstream" 20th century composers. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/5-12-examples-of-experimental-music-notation-92223646/?no-ist


9

In the context of Baroque dance music or suites, then there are good reasons to use 3/8 in preference of 3/4 (or vice versa). In the days before metronomes, how the music was notated would be an indication of performance speed. The notation would also be specific to a particular dance. I have borrowed diagrams from Jan van Biezen, who has written ...


6

First off, you're not quite getting the point of the things you are bringing up. Parallel fifths and octaves looked down upon it counterpoint not because they sound bad, but because in counterpoint you want all your melodies to be independent and parallel octaves and fifths make your melodies interdependent. The dominant 7th came into popularity due to the ...


5

I don't have any examples, but there are melodies (possibly stretching the definition of "music" a bit) composed mostly or solely of "effects", like "a crashing glass", "a gunshot", "a ringing telephone", "a low moan", "the sound of a cat" etc. You could adapt standard notation for it, but a great part of your music would be in the "legend" (which effect ...


5

Certainly current musical notation is incapable of handling note durations that aren't rational multiples of each other. For instance if you had a melody where one of the long tones was pi times the duration of one of the short tones then there is no way to explicitly notate this (it is possible to get as close an approximation as is desired though).


5

The melodies of Turkish classical, Arabic, and Hindustani have all come to terms with various means of notating their microtonal and non-Western tones and intervals, the Turkish Makams being, probably, one of the best of such systems. Still, all notation is just a guideline. Instruments that play glissandos by sliding on strings or by any other means ...


4

"Furthermore, how do I know if a certain musical idea (i.e. A melody and its accompanying harmony) will work if I were to just notate the music without plucking it out first on my piano?" You cultivate your "inner ear". An essential facility for any composer, arranger etc. Before there was Common Practice harmony, there was Organum. NOT using parallel ...


3

All of the above answers are correct. We can generalize here: the rules that govern what is permissible in music evolve, both in cultures and in individuals. Bach is beautiful within and because of what is not allowed to him, and so is Patti Smith. You can make up your own rules. But there's no guarantee they will work for everyone or anyone else. If ...


2

Daniel is correct, but I believe the "epic" effect you're referring to (as produced by a choir) is the chorus effect. From Wikipedia: In music, a chorus effect (sometimes chorusing or chorused effect) occurs when individual sounds with approximately the same timbre, and very similar pitch converge and are perceived as one. While similar sounds coming ...


2

Its called a choir, which is an ensemble of human voices. So I don't have to write a long-winded answer on how a choir works, you can find out more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choir (General choir stuff) http://www.totalchoirresources.com/lets-talk-choir-formations/ (Choir formations)


2

Not really, because notation systems have always evolved to accommodate the music composers are writing. Baroque composers, particularly French ones, came up with all kinds of weird notation, some of it unique to the composer. An example: La Sylva by Forqueray (pg. 37 of this document), written in the 18th century. The information about what the odd ...


1

My recommendation is to quadruple your note values, and write it in 6/8. That is, the first 6 32nd notes become one measure. If the music is supposed to be fast (which is the impression I get), then let that be reflected by the tempo mark.


1

There must be something within each piece of music that has survived to our own times for it to remain fresh, inspired and worth keeping in the repertoire. Being quite fond of Baroque and pre- Baroque styles does not embrace some weird and horribly limited fad for recording four linked concerti by one Antonio Vivaldi and patently ignoring his ' other' ...


1

My answer is that it has to do with feel. I heard a concert where the conductor changed from 4/4 to 3/8 quietly he counted "one and two" that implies 3/8 eighths while a 3/4 has : one and two and three and, from this you feel the difference, and the difference is quite big.


1

Scales are in essence a series of notes a certain amount of intervals / semitones from each other. You can have the semi tones in any place in the scale. You can have various amount of notes in the scale. 8 notes in the scale is common as it represents all the scale degrees. Major Scales have the semitones between the third and fourth scale degrees and the ...


1

Logic sucks. Avoid it like the plague. Unless they jave fixed the multitimbral bug, you will run an instance of ko takt for every midi track you use. Almost 500mb per instance!!! Tracks will not route to channels independently and every sample loaded will receive the other tracks automation. MADDENING! If you are serious spend the 750 and keep using a DAW ...


1

"So far, the only thing I understood about rags from that video was that rag time seems to occasionally involve desynchronizing the melody from the accompaniment." Correct. March in the left hand, syncopation in the right. Flounderer posted a good video. I like this one too: The Wikipedia article on ragtime talks about ...



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