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22

The fact that you are in A minor without G# (or F# and G#) means that you are in A natural minor. What defines a scale as minor or major, is the third of the scale, not the accidentals. If you have A as the root of your scale and the third is a C, then the scale is a minor one. There are 3 different types of minor scales: A harmonic minor (it has G#) A ...


8

It's a key change: it changes from E minor to C# phrygian without preparing the listener. That's probably why the beginning of the solo sounds dissonant to you, i.e. dissonant in relation to what came before. Unexpected (i.e. unprepared) key changes will always have such an effect. The more notes change from one key to the other, the stronger the effect ...


8

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


5

It's not that common, but that's why it can work very well to make your song stand out. Often it's important to prepare the listener's ear for the change. Three great examples are Billy Joel's "Scenes from an Italian Restaurant" Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Freebird"


4

It's unusual - listen to a hundred songs and you may well not hear this idea in even one. However, the song is your baby to bring up how you like. Others may or may not like it when it's grown up! When there's one performer - singer/guitarist, maybe, there's no problem, as he knows the acceleration rate. With multiple performers, someone will have to ...


3

It is very typical for the key of A minor to have the G# leading tone, which helps to add tension to the V (E) chord, and brings a clear resolution to the tonic (A). However, even if only G-natural is used, if your listener still feels a sense that A is the tonic, i.e., the piece revolves around A, then that would make a safe argument that the piece is ...


3

To put it simply, in a song, there's melody and there's chords. They do have some relation (certain notes do not sound good with certain chords, to various degrees) but they are two separate things. In order to play the guitar you sould know the chords (you already have that), in order to sing the melody you should find the notes sequence that consist it. ...


3

Which brings me to my question, how DO you write successive, non-functional chord progressions like chromatic ascending/descending bass? You write them using pencil and paper, sometimes a computer, sometimes just in your head, sometimes as you play an instrument. I believe your real question is how do you create successive non-functional ...


3

You obviously know a lot about theory, but always be aware that theory is someone's attempt to explain what has happened. None of this theory has passed into 'law', so it's still 'theoretical'. Before the theories, folks were writing and playing music. It stood or fell on its own merits. O.k. some of it was way before its time, so was not accepted when it ...


2

All music styles are overlapping hybrids, so you consistently find elements of one in another. However, there are identifiable characteristics of American Country Music, as long as you understand you will often see those very characteristics in blues, rock and roll and other popular forms with a common heritage. Probably the most prominent feature would ...


2

When you write the analysis, mention your knowledge of melodic and harmonic scales, and your decision to use the natural minor scale instead. Discuss whether the lack of a strong dominant>tonic structure including the G# leading note allows it to be in a "key". And make sure the piece IS melodically centered on A. That should cover any possible ...


1

Nobody mentioned the point of view of dancers yet. Personally, I find it very difficult to dance to songs which change tempo, but I am not a very good dancer. Many people love it, especially if they have heard the song before and know that a change of tempo is coming up. Or if the change of tempo is telegraphed by the music (for example, I am not sure what ...


1

if you have some of the same drummers i've had, you're not not going to have a choice, the tempo will vary! :) seriously, you probably already vary tempos slightly naturally just as an expressive means, and doing so intentionally as you want to build or release energy is good practice. Doing a big jump is sort of unusual, but there's certainly no law ...


1

This is called comping. You play the same chord in different positions. It creates movement and exhibits the whole range of the instruments while in some cases it generates interesting voicings like your Gsus. It sounds cool and its the dirty job of a guitarist.


1

I don't think that there's a specific name for such a progression. You basically repeat a chord in different inversions. However, the way I hear the second chord (with A in the bass) is not as a version of G. Of course you can call it Gsus2, but the question is if you hear it as a Gsus2. I don't because the 2 in the bass (A) is quite uncommon and suggests ...


1

If you already have the song, the notes are already there to be sung. If you only sang a C note with a C chord etc, it would be a poor song. A C chord will work with several notes from the C scale. The best are C, E and G, as they actually make up that chord. Depending where in the bar you sing other notes over it, others may or may not fit. Your ear will ...


1

To add to all the very good answers - consider reading a treatise on orchestration in your spare time. Ravel's and Stravinskij's are public domain, as is Rimskij-Korsakov's: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33900/33900-h/33900-h.htm I realize how absurdly wacky this sounds, especially since it's not exactly a light read, but in there are exposed some ...



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