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21

The simple answer is no. Think of it this way: Does a composer write pieces only for instruments he can play? No, he does not. He might compose pieces for instruments that he has never touched in his life. You don't have to be a virtuoso pianist to compose fast music. You have to learn how to imagine what you want to compose. If you can imagine your piece ...


9

I think it is a common misconception that playing fast makes you great at your instrument. Playing slow music correctly and in time, with good interpretation is to me much more of a skill tester than playing fast. Many times when there is music played a high tempo the speed takes center stage and a lot of the principles of good melody takes a back burner, ...


5

No textbook is flawless. Even ignoring the occasional typo, every student is different and learns in a different way, so the best textbook for one student might be just "eh" for another. (And don't even get me started on cost...) I've worked extensively with both the Laitz and Clendinning/Marvin textbooks, and I can enthusiastically recommend both. They ...


4

Shevliaskovic has it spot on: You should be able to hear it in your head That, IMO, pretty much wraps up what composing is all about: imagining how something would sound. Of course, one way to get this imagination is to actually listen to different possible options, by trying stuff on an instrument or a MIDI editor. But that's totally not necessary! In ...


3

The easiest way to do it is write all the music for the scene before you shoot the movie! But seriously, this is pretty much the way that composing music has always been taught and learned. It's the same technique as learning a foreign language: you start by responding to simple musical ideas that only require a small musical "vocabulary" and "grammar", ...


3

Just buy a program that will help you record your music and start! You don't even need a keyboard! (in fact, a keyboard may slow you down because sometimes you won't be able to play what you imagine) You could start with a program like Reason or Cubase and take advantage of VST instruments to write various instruments and drums by programming them. Start ...


3

Like a lot of pop songs, the 'middle 8' starts on the IV chord. So here, in D, the middle section goes to G. D9 is a dominant form of D, including the b7 C and an E (the 9th) on top of that. It's simply a variant of D that pushes to G, the IV. Edit - with the C and E sung, it gives a flavour - if not the whole 'chord' of C, which happens to be the IV of the ...


3

Well, this was a nice distraction, thanks! First off, what piece, or composer, is this? (I'm just curious.) Here's what I've got: I chose this route for a few reasons: The odd time signatures may seem strange, but it's certainly not written in 4/4. You'll need to have a few oddities and a few changes in an excerpt like this, it's just the facts of ...


2

I have been playing guitar for more than 10 years, and the only book I ever needed was this one, which I was recommended by many people on the Ultimate-Guitar.com forum. https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine/dp/1883217040/ You can read the first few chapters for free on the Amazon website. It's not just for playing jazz, but covers all the ...


2

The reason the first section sounds dissonant is because the perfect fifth is very low, and so this may sound dissonant even though it is not. You can hear a similar (or possibly increased) effect if you have a major third instead of your perfect fifth at a similar pitch, because the notes will be closer together at the low pitch. In the second section, it ...


2

No, you don't have to even play an instrument to write for it. But you need to know how to write for that instrument, otherwise you can write things that are not playable, or that don't work well on the instrument. Since you are asking the question, you don't know well how to write for piano, therefore I suggest you get advice from a good pianist who can ...


1

It seems to me there are unlimited possibilities for making songs. So it is hard to make a suggestion. There's one simple formula, though, that seems common and easy to work with: AABA By this, consider A to be a musical riff or idea. You repeat it (the second A), then do something very different (B), then repeat it again (the last A). The A sections don't ...


1

Steps to improvising a melody from random notes: Sing the notes to yourself. See if by singing the notes over and over you spontaneously create a melody. See if a counter-melody suggests itself to you that responds to this spontaneous melody. Play the note sequence as stated Play any melody or counter-melody. Add connecting notes between the notes of ...


1

Previous replies should answer a lot of your questions. The first three notes in your YouTube example are B, D and F. Those are the third, fifth, and seventh notes (chords) of the key of G. He is playing some kind of a G Major scale. It sounds like he plays G Major 7, D7 the V7 and the vii, F minor 7 flat V. It could be played as all 7th chords or other ...


1

Great scene! Well, it happens that those notes fit on some scale. I don't know, let's say, for example, A major. So, this scale is composed of the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F# and G#. This gives you a framework to work with. With those notes, you can play chords and/or melodies. Each scale gives you a framework to improvise with.


1

If playing keyboards is your thing, then do not get something too mini. To get good enough at creating music, you are going to have to learn music theory. The best way to learn music theory is to start playing something. Keyboards are good because it is easier to learn music theory on and the learning curve (physical hand movement, placement of notes and ...


1

Your use of the word 'meticulous' reminded me of my first theory teacher relating this stern instruction in best school marm fashion: You may break any of these hallowed rules of musical composition only after you are totally familiar with all of them, because by then you will know enough to strictly contain yourself until you thoroughly understand WHY these ...


1

To explain in academic theory/composition language: the D9 is a secondary dominant chord in the key of D which is being used here to tonicize the G, or temporarily make it sound more like the tonal center. The dominant chord, the V, always has a root a fifth above the root of the tonic, so the dominant chord in D is A (or A7). Using the dominant 7 form of ...


1

The issue is not due only to equal temperament, which makes the fifths slightly smaller (so "dirtier") than they should be, but also due to inharmonicity. Inharmonicity means that, due to the nature of the strings, the harmonics deviate from their theoretical pitch. That means that, for lower notes, the high harmonics may be quite "out of tune" so to speak. ...



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