Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

The list above is a great start. I'll add a few names below, but first let me speak to the technical question. There are a few basic techniques that characterize so-called minimalism in music. Not every minimalist or post-minimalist uses all these, and a number of composers who used to be called minimalists have changed style dramatically over the years, but ...


9

There are a lot of different kinds of Minimalisms, so my first suggestion would be to explore a bunch of different composers with extremely open ears: Philip Glass - Personally, my favorite work is his opera Einstein on the Beach, but his string quartets are also great, and the piano etudes can be a nice introduction. His work tends to still operate within ...


4

You can use any synth that will let you work with frequencies instead of notes, like Absynth. You can assign specific frequencies to each oscillator, and/or assign specific frequencies to each MIDI note/key. You can use it with the host of your choice (DAW, tracker, external recorder, whatever). For more flexibility you might want to look into audio ...


3

I think this depends purely on you. If you want to write a song that you want to be played the way you hear it in your head, you have to add markings; otherwise, you can let the musicians play it the way they feel. The latter would be really difficult in an orchestra; this is why the orchestra scores usually have a lot of markings, whilst the small ones can ...


3

Your score should ideally contain all of the information necessary for a professional musician to sightread the piece properly on the first try. By "properly," we just mean that they understand the basic techniques they need to execute to convey the idea of what you want. If you don't care what they do, then don't include markings! And to the contrary, there ...


1

I have found (and have been taught) to include a lot of dynamics, articulations, slurs and markings. If your music fits stylistically into well established genres, it probably requires fewer markings in order to get a good interpretation. Conversely, if your music is less conventional, then the more information you give to the performer about what you had ...


1

Have I got a treat for you. Learn this stuff the way the actual composers did @ http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/partimenti/index.htm The other references given in this thread, while excellent, are counterpoint manuals, and unless you really want to write fugues and inventions, go for this "hands on" historically accurate teaching ...


1

Just some minor additions to an almost perfect answer by @AxxieD Minor scales are believed to be more depressing/sad than the major scales which is probably why you like them. Also it depends on your mood. But that is not always the case! A specific combination of notes of the minor scale can also make it sound happy/like a major scale. Similarly a ...


1

I can see how you might be confused by having a smattering of theoretical statements thrown at you. Let's think a little philosophically instead: Okay, you are composing a piece in any given key, the arrangement (whole and half steps) of which is always the same based on the tonic (first or home tone) of that scale. Think in analogies. You write a paragraph ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible