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17

C sharp major has seven sharps, D flat major has five flats. Out of the box, the latter is preferable. The former may be more appropriate when there is more material requiring "flattening" the key signature than otherwise. Now major is a rather sharp mode, so it's not quite unlikely. For example, a "proper" fully diminuished chord in C sharp features ...


14

You have stumbled across the PENTATONIC SCALE. Of which there are two - major and minor. Ascending, by starting on F#/Gb, you have the major pent., start on D#/Eb and it's the minor. The five notes (hence pent!) work well and harmoniously together, with nothing that clashes (is dissonant). These notes work well together, as the 'avoid notes' as we call ...


10

Yes indeed there is a key of C Sharp Major (C# Major). But the key of C Sharp Major is the “enharmonic equivalent” of the key of D Flat Major. What that means is that all of the notes in the C sharp major scale sound pretty much exactly the same (to the human ear) as all the notes in the D Flat major scale – only they are notated (written) differently. ...


5

Once a melody is composed and written in one key using the notes from said key's corresponding scale, that same melody can then be "transposed" (converted) to any other key that exist in Western music. The process of composing any piece of music follows a strict methodology. Below I will explain the process of transposing any piece of music from one key ...


5

Adding to the narrative in other answers, here is a chart that might help further explain why brass players tend to prefer sheet music written in keys with flats. As is shown, written keys that exclude the “worst-to-play usual notes” (elaborated below) on common brass instruments (except French horn) are overwhelmingly keys with flats. This is ...


4

A pragmatic answer: if there is a way to notate that repeats are to be played on D.C. or D.S., it is not well known. I'm not saying there is no such standard, only that it is not widespread. The best you can do is to write it out: "D.S. with repeats", or "D.S con repetizione" if you prefer italian.


4

You really have two questions there. I'm going to answer this one: In a section like the chorus, how do you get the layering of many instrument to get that full and rich impression? Playing a bunch of instruments at the same time can easily lead to a big mess, even when the instruments are playing compatible notes. Playing the exact same thing on the ...


4

In the classical sector, there is Chopins etude for the black keys, G flat major, op. 10, no. 5, cf youtube for sound and imslp for the score.


2

The other upvoted answers here are good and I don't want to repeat them, but I think that there is a lot to add. Surely the key of C-Sharp Major must exist! So why is it never or rarely used? There are several factors that need to be taken into consideration. Here I list a few: Historical To understand modern scales you need to look at how they ...


2

Following on from Rockin's excellent answer, it's apparent that KNOWING your keys and their respective signatures ('sharps and flats') is going to make the process much quicker to execute. On guitar, when using tunes that don't use open strings, the process won't use quite so much brain power. Just as a capo can help change key, you can do the same sort of ...


1

I can relate to your situation. I am a songwriter/composer as well and I am decent on guitar - but totally lousy on drums. So I rely on sampled loops in my Boss BR800 Multi Track recorder that I can adjust the tempo and add fills, and endings and variations. The software will even let me create custom drum tracks from the existing loops/samples. ...


1

I forced myself to learn (on a Boss drum machine in the 80's) from drummer's books. These books are not that expensive. Search Amazon for instance - there are a few that have hundreds of patterns and can keep you busy for a while. You can learn so much that way. You can also find drum tabs online. Sites such as this - http://drumbum.com/drumtabs. ...


1

Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...


1

First you should start with what key you want your music to be in - maybe a major key if your song is a Pop song. Then, you need to work out how many beats in a bar your music is going to have: 4/4, 3/4, 8/8? Now, to compose the melody of your music, imagine how you want your music to be. I can't help you with your melody, because you are the only one who ...


1

Put the name of the composer (perhaps in a smaller font or in parenthesis) under the name of the song. Maybe right justified so as not to dominate.


1

I fear that your question is so broad that it might well be put on hold, or you might be asked to make your question a bit narrower, but have a possible recommendation: Hindemith's book - "Elementary Training for Musicians" would certainly enable you learn all the basics of music, such as rhythm, notation, scales etc. It is a tough book to work through, ...



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