Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

NO, writing a tenor-recorder part for an oboist would be about as helpful as me giving you a sandwich to breath underwater. Each instrument responds very differently throughout their range, and while the core fingering principles may be similar (as with saxophone, flute, clarinet, and bassoon as well), each instrument has its own nuances. Fingering wise, ...


5

If I understand Pat's answer he seems to be saying that composers of the era were not consciously writing music that obeyed these principles. So am I to take it that at no point was a composer thinking "Ok, so this is the fundamental voice-leading note here, and these other notes are not, and this fundamental note connects to this fundamental ...


5

Look what the score is doing: you have an oscillation rising from F♯ in the initial RH part, moving up to C♯, but artfully dodging A♯. At the same time, you have an accompaniment that consists largely of the fifth D-A alternating with the auxiliary notes E-G. The entire section is acting like an elaboration of a D major chord in a kind of quasi-Lydian ...


4

Here is a non-comprehensive list of such pieces: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TruckDriversGearChange Under the "Subversions" sections you can find some pieces that modulate down. e.g. Inverted in "Tonight" from West Side Story, which moves down a half-step with each successive chorus so the final one can end calmly and quietly.


3

I have no idea what Bartok was thinking when he wrote this, but one way to create something similar would be: 1. Start with a "big idea". In this case, "hey, what happens if the left hand plays the white keys and the right hand the black keys". (OK, that's not quite accurate because the right hand plays the white key B, but you get the idea). 2. Figure out ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible