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I am 16 and I have chromesthesia, the type of synesthesia being discussed where I hear sounds and see colors. I think it might be of interest to you to learn that this is genetic in my family (my father and my paternal grandmother and myself) and we all have the same colors for the same notes or songs. If it matters to you which are which this is it: A = ...


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Morton Feldman is a major composer in this sort of music. His style was very quite, slow enough to be essentially ametric, and in his later works he become interested in extremes of time - his String Quartet No. 2 is over six hours long. Rothko Chapel is his best-known work. Feldman's does often included some quite strong dissonance, unlike much other ...


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Try listening to works by Vaughan Williams. Some parts of his works are very atmospheric. An example would be "Fantasy on a Theme by Thomas Tallis". It was used in the film "Master and Commander" to give an atmospheric feel to a little boat in a big ocean.


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I have this as well, but strangely enough it's more associated with composers than keys. I have no idea why. Mozart is generally red. Chopin is deep blue, with some exceptions: for example the Ab Polonaise is red. Brahms is green. Schumann and Liszt are both purple. Beethoven has different colors for different pieces. Bach is often white, the only one ...


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There exists a "normal" dynamic. This "normal", however, is not a generic dynamic marking, but a specific marking that fits each piece. For example, a normal dynamic for a Chopin nocturne might be p, but a normal dynamic for a Liszt etude might be f. Basically, the "zero level" for each song is different. If you want to implement a "normal" dynamic, don't ...


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In the same way that verbal tempo indications (andante, largo etc.) indicate more than just BPM measured with a clock, verbal dynamics indications mean more than just volume as measured by a decibel meter. "mp" means to approach the music as though it were "quiet music" even if the overall volume is not dissimilar from "mf" -- though the latter could be ...


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It's all relative. It will depend on the venue, the size of orchestra, the whim of the conductor. When a 'middle' level is established, then the proper markings come into their own, as in mp will be a little quieter, while mf is a little louder. As far as 'is ff twice as loud as f?' is concerned, please don't ask! Haven't met a conductor with a decibel meter ...


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You need to know theory because: Music composition is a craft. You may very well do something intuitively, but that doesn't change the fact that you need to learn the craft. More often people have an intuition for melody and harmony but they rarely have intuition for form, and form essentially is composition. Without form your music is at best sound design ...


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Just a brief meta-theoretical note: Rockin' Cowboy's answer above recapitulates a whole line of 19th-ct attempts to derive the basic functions of tonal music from the major triad (which at least one theorist called the "Chord of Nature" because of the way it follows the overtone series). In order to do that, they constructed a dualist system: that is, for ...



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