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5

First off, I'm going to say that many people have key preferences and there's nothing wrong with that. If you want to adapt to major keys for listening or writing, it's all a matter of preference. And not all songs in minor keys have to sound sad; there are several examples of this. Panic! at the Disco, for example. Each key has different components and ...


5

Rudiments are just the different basic sequences. You can play them in any order, but you will find some work well and some sound less good. As with many aspects of music, it comes down to what you think sounds good. It is not random, but depends on what you are trying to do. Your best plan is to listen to drummers you really like and learn their fills and ...


4

Without getting into an entire lecture, here are some things you can do to make someone feel as though a piece of music is being concluded: Go to an extreme (pitch, dynamics, tempo, instrumentation) either to the most/high/loud or the soft/slow/low end for example. Typically rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic motion slow down. If there are motives or ...


4

In the same way you'd compose any other passage of music, but ignore the elements of harmony and melody. Although, as with a lot of sound art or noise composition, you can write something with the 'idea' of melody but without precise pitches. Do you want your fill to ascend in pitch, or descend? Think like this: rhythm: Are there any distinctive rhythms ...


4

There is an interesting irony here, because the song Lee linked to ("Taro") doesn't do any of the things that one would immediately think of as concluding: it doesn't actually bring the rhythm to a stop, nor does it end on the tonic chord. Instead it fades out on a repeating, open-ended cycle of simple diatonic chords (ii - I - vi - V). I would guess that ...


2

Since this question was finally reopened, I'll try to respond to it. Before giving any specific advice, a comment on the term musique concrète will be necessary. With a more traditional understanding, we may think of music as made up of pitches organised into melodies and harmonies in some rhythmic pattern that can be notated in a score. This is an abstract ...


2

I would recommend a I64 V I cadence, with the bass going "so so do." For example in C major: with a ritardando. I see jjmusicnotes recommended cadences, and this one is the most common.


1

You might consider http://www.ars-nova.com/cp/ (though I haven't used it myself, so I don't know about 21st-century style). I'd also second A Practical Approach to Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint in the question to which @Dave has linked.



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