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5

Oratorios are similar to operas, but are unstaged, and are based on religious topics. Some common examples include: Handel's Messiah, Saul, Israel in Egypt, and Esther; Bach's Christmas Oratorio (and, arguably, his two Passions, which are essentially similar in form), Haydn's Creation, and Mendelssohn's Elijah and Christus. The best thing you can do is "dig ...


5

You need to have a clear concept of what constitutes a "pleasing" sequence. For some people, the sequence should be all diatonic. For others, entirely dissonant intervals are more preferable. As others have noted, the speed of the sequence is gestural and not melodic, therefore greater attention must be paid to beginning / ending notes of the sequence ...


3

The best resources I know are a pair of books by French composers, André Gedalge's "Traité de la fugue" and Charles Koechlin's "Étude sur l'écriture de la fugue d'école". This is possibly because scholastic fugue (fugue d'école) is very much part of the French Conservatoire system's curriculum, while it seems to be very uncommon in the English-speaking ...


2

An oratorio is essentially an opera that can be performed in a church. It is a concert piece rather than a staged piece and it is usually religious; other than that, you can basically approach it in the same way your would approach an opera, which is to say, in many different ways. As for structure: traditionally, you would have an overture, and then ...



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