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6

I stand with Shevliaskovic on this: You can indeed do what ever you want. Taking your question as written, that is the exact correct response. However, I believe that this is what you really wanted to know: It is true that G Major key has a D Major chord as the dominant (fifth chord of the key), and that D Major key has G Major chord as the sub-dominant ...


6

First of all, since this is your composition, you can do whatever you want. Unless you're going for something very specific, like you want to write your song in a certain style, there are no limits. Go nuts. In your example, I assume you're in the G major key, and you have a D major chord, right? If this is the case, then yes you can freely use the D ...


3

Adding further to the two existing answers, the notes of MODES will fit slightly better than the notes of each major scale. On chord G, obviously, the G scale notes fit best. Still in the KEY of G, but on a D chord, the notes of D Mixolydian are a (slightly) better fit, and on a C chord, the notes from C Lydian likewise. So, what's happening is that on ...


2

C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


2

Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


1

A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...


1

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? It's not common, but there is precedent: "We Do What We Can" by Sheryl Crow (track #10 from her debut album) "Fool in the Rain" by Led Zeppelin I could probably think of a few others, but it's getting ...


1

You mention "...showcase a vocal range" -- sometimes it's out of necessity rather than showcasing. Two examples I can think of offhand include: Islands in the Stream as recorded by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. Kenny has the vocal lead for the first verse and chorus (in C major), but then the song modulates two whole tones lower (A♭ major) so that Dolly ...



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