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25

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


17

C sharp major has seven sharps, D flat major has five flats. Out of the box, the latter is preferable. The former may be more appropriate when there is more material requiring "flattening" the key signature than otherwise. Now major is a rather sharp mode, so it's not quite unlikely. For example, a "proper" fully diminuished chord in C sharp features C-...


15

NO, writing a tenor-recorder part for an oboist would be about as helpful as me giving you a sandwich to breath underwater. Each instrument responds very differently throughout their range, and while the core fingering principles may be similar (as with saxophone, flute, clarinet, and bassoon as well), each instrument has its own nuances. Fingering wise, ...


14

You have stumbled across the PENTATONIC SCALE. Of which there are two - major and minor. Ascending, by starting on F#/Gb, you have the major pent., start on D#/Eb and it's the minor. The five notes (hence pent!) work well and harmoniously together, with nothing that clashes (is dissonant). These notes work well together, as the 'avoid notes' as we call them,...


13

If you mean can one compose a melody using notes that are not defined in any recognized form of musical notation - then the answer is certainly! And if you compose a musical work that uses tones that are not defined in say 12 Tone Equal Temperament or other common tuning or notation system, there is no universally accepted way to transcribe those tones ...


11

It could be argued that any digital recording of the melody in question is a notation of that particular performance: It's something that can be followed to reproduce the original performance. It can be written down (any digital recording is made of bits that can be encoded as ink on paper, if need be). Anyone with the right training and equipment can use ...


10

Yes indeed there is a key of C Sharp Major (C# Major). But the key of C Sharp Major is the “enharmonic equivalent” of the key of D Flat Major. What that means is that all of the notes in the C sharp major scale sound pretty much exactly the same (to the human ear) as all the notes in the D Flat major scale – only they are notated (written) differently. ...


10

Sure. Here are some examples of scores by John Cage, Steve Reich, Brian Eno, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Cornelius Cardew - all recognized "mainstream" 20th century composers. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/5-12-examples-of-experimental-music-notation-92223646/?no-ist


10

But what about modern day tonal music? I have played around on my piano with chord progressions that break all of those "rules" and if you'll forgive me for taking the risk of sounding cocky, I sound amazing! I daresay you do! However, while you may be breaking those rules, you're probably obeying newer ones. As time moves forward, more styles are ...


9

Intro: G to E This could work chromatically. It doesn't really belong to any scale. You play G and by chromatically changing G to G# you go to E. Beatles had a similar progression on the verse of their song 'Honey Don't': They start with an E major chord that is followed by a C major chord. It creates a nice sound because ...


9

The rules about parallal octaves only apply when writing Bach chorale-type harmony where the aim is rich harmony with no one part "sticking out" disproportionately. Because this is often the first type of harmony we are taught to write, we can fall into the trap of thinking it's the ONLY way of doing it! Orchestration is all about doubling lines, often in ...


8

In the context of Baroque dance music or suites, then there are good reasons to use 3/8 in preference of 3/4 (or vice versa). In the days before metronomes, how the music was notated would be an indication of performance speed. The notation would also be specific to a particular dance. I have borrowed diagrams from Jan van Biezen, who has written ...


8

Welcome to becoming a composer. Instruments in general sound different in different parts of there range. A fourth will be a fourth where ever it's played, but how it sounds is slightly different due to this. When transposing something by a fourth, this can be a huge difference depending on where it lies for an instrument. A simple example to demonstrate ...


8

Structurally ragtime harmony is pretty much classical tonal harmony, but there are of course some idiomatic specificities that give ragtime its characteristic sound. One progression very characteristic of ragtime is the so called... ragtime progression (although it was used before, even in classical music, it was mostly popularized in ragtime). It's made ...


7

I'm going to give a very cursory simplification for the answer because asking about Lydian Chromatic theory is just like asking about Set Theory or Serialism. Lydian Chromatic Concept Theory basically asserts that the lydian scale is more closely aligned to the natural, universal properties of sound than the conventional major scale. It explains and ...


7

I'm not a programmer so I cannot say anything about the validity of the program but what I can say is that all of these parameters will not give you medieval music. I usually just completely abstain from interacting with these types of questions because I do not want to build an atmosphere of opposition in my post on this site but I think I can make a ...


7

You need to be humble, first and foremost. Especially as an undergraduate, accept and try everything that your teachers tell you - especially if you don't agree with what they say. Composers who believe they know best tend to learn little and their careers suffer as well. Write as much music as humanly possible. ALWAYS revise - especially when it's ...


7

First of all, since this is your composition, you can do whatever you want. Unless you're going for something very specific, like you want to write your song in a certain style, there are no limits. Go nuts. In your example, I assume you're in the G major key, and you have a D major chord, right? If this is the case, then yes you can freely use the D ...


6

"it seems to me like dissonance can be used like a theme for music." What is the proper understanding of the use of dissonance in composition? First off, dissonance is the general term for a clash or tension in a single chord or sound, such as one might have playing a half step (minor second) or a tritone (diminished 5th, augmented 4th). Consonance, its ...


6

It's not clear what your goals and requirements are for this information system -- and that has a huge bearing on the answer. If, for example, your software is trying to analyze the harmony inside of a single piece, then yes, symphonies definitely will modulate (change keys) all over the place, as Wheat Williams describes in his excellent answer. And this ...


6

I stand with Shevliaskovic on this: You can indeed do what ever you want. Taking your question as written, that is the exact correct response. However, I believe that this is what you really wanted to know: It is true that G Major key has a D Major chord as the dominant (fifth chord of the key), and that D Major key has G Major chord as the sub-dominant (...


6

First off, you're not quite getting the point of the things you are bringing up. Parallel fifths and octaves looked down upon it counterpoint not because they sound bad, but because in counterpoint you want all your melodies to be independent and parallel octaves and fifths make your melodies interdependent. The dominant 7th came into popularity due to the ...


5

Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


5

Elaine Gould's excellent book Behind Bars includes a section on humming which gives three options for notation: Humming is indicated by a verbal instruction hum or bocca chiusa, abbrev: b.c. (Italian, 'mouth closed'). It is important to place the instruction above the stave, so that the singer does not articulate it as if it were sung text (a). Where ...


5

No, it's absolutely not necessarily. It can certainly be helpful in a number of ways, but experimentation and perseverance can get you far. One example of an accomplished tone-deaf composer is Robert Fripp. It's not necessary to know exactly what note you're hearing to know that it sounds good! That test is hard. As the page says, "excellent musicians ...


5

B7 is the dominant of Em (the relative minor of G), so the first two chords appear to be preparing a cadence to Em. Instead, there is a C chord, which is 'almost' Em - either IV in G or VI in Em. The A chord has a similar function as the B - it can be taken as a secondary dominant, leading to D (which isn't played). It also is IV of Em - a major subdominant. ...


5

Adding to the narrative in other answers, here is a chart that might help further explain why brass players tend to prefer sheet music written in keys with flats. As is shown, written keys that exclude the “worst-to-play usual notes” (elaborated below) on common brass instruments (except French horn) are overwhelmingly keys with flats. This is ...


5

If I understand you correctly, it should be something like this:



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