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25

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


24

The fact that you are in A minor without G# (or F# and G#) means that you are in A natural minor. What defines a scale as minor or major, is the third of the scale, not the accidentals. If you have A as the root of your scale and the third is a C, then the scale is a minor one. There are 3 different types of minor scales: A harmonic minor (it has G#) A ...


15

NO, writing a tenor-recorder part for an oboist would be about as helpful as me giving you a sandwich to breath underwater. Each instrument responds very differently throughout their range, and while the core fingering principles may be similar (as with saxophone, flute, clarinet, and bassoon as well), each instrument has its own nuances. Fingering wise, ...


14

Listen, listen, listen to lots of new kinds of music. Regularly. Not just your style or your favorites. Don't just listen. Marinate. Challenge yourself. It'll be tough initially, and it may not hold your attention, but the exercise does pay off. You'll start to hear things "out of the box" that you didn't before and you'll have fresher perspectives on your ...


10

Just a few ideas: A keyboard instrument provides a lot more freedom in terms of the number of notes that can be sounded together and the distance between them. It's difficult on a guitar to play a fluidly moving bassline and a chord pattern two octaves above; it's trivial on a piano. The sustain mechanism of a piano allows for all notes to sustain at once; ...


9

It's a key change: it changes from E minor to C# phrygian without preparing the listener. That's probably why the beginning of the solo sounds dissonant to you, i.e. dissonant in relation to what came before. Unexpected (i.e. unprepared) key changes will always have such an effect. The more notes change from one key to the other, the stronger the effect ...


9

Absolutely not late at all. Not only is it never late, but you are extremely young. I started learning classical music at the same age as you (I am currently 28), and I now compose and play piano and am starting music school as a hobby (late night after work classes). I did all my theory learning via self study. You can definitely find resources online. ...


9

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


8

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


8

Welcome to becoming a composer. Instruments in general sound different in different parts of there range. A fourth will be a fourth where ever it's played, but how it sounds is slightly different due to this. When transposing something by a fourth, this can be a huge difference depending on where it lies for an instrument. A simple example to demonstrate ...


7

You know what used to work for me? Take the chords off a popular song and write to those. Or take the rhythm of a melody and see how it works with other chords - maybe in another mode. You know the Mickey Mouse March? Dam-dadam, dam-dadam, dam-dadam-dadam? Nice, now find an interesting sequence of chords. In minor, even. Now try to come up (in your ...


7

I'm reminded of how the sci-fi author, Lois McMaster Bujold, keeps her books moving along: "What's the worst thing that can happen to the protagonist now?" You, of course, don't want to write the worst thing, but you do want something that will a) give you a hook to work with, and b) keep the song hopping, and that means a very similar way of working. The ...


7

I'm not a programmer so I cannot say anything about the validity of the program but what I can say is that all of these parameters will not give you medieval music. I usually just completely abstain from interacting with these types of questions because I do not want to build an atmosphere of opposition in my post on this site but I think I can make a ...


7

You need to be humble, first and foremost. Especially as an undergraduate, accept and try everything that your teachers tell you - especially if you don't agree with what they say. Composers who believe they know best tend to learn little and their careers suffer as well. Write as much music as humanly possible. ALWAYS revise - especially when it's ...


6

Casey's answer is fundamental and should be thoroughly understood. When you're ready to go farther afield, you can use other closely-related minor 7th chords. Consider this chord progression: I-I7-IV-V7-I. The I7 is a "secondary dominant", the "V7 of the IV" chord. It gives a stronger feeling of "fourness" to the IV chord. Now, if you wanted to more ...


6

Intro: G to E This could work chromatically. It doesn't really belong to any scale. You play G and by chromatically changing G to G# you go to E. Beatles had a similar progression on the verse of their song 'Honey Don't': They start with an E major chord that is followed by a C major chord. It creates a nice sound because ...


5

It's not that common, but that's why it can work very well to make your song stand out. Often it's important to prepare the listener's ear for the change. Three great examples are Billy Joel's "Scenes from an Italian Restaurant" Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Freebird"


5

To put it simply, in a song, there's melody and there's chords. They do have some relation (certain notes do not sound good with certain chords, to various degrees) but they are two separate things. In order to play the guitar you sould know the chords (you already have that), in order to sing the melody you should find the notes sequence that consist it. ...


5

If I understand Pat's answer he seems to be saying that composers of the era were not consciously writing music that obeyed these principles. So am I to take it that at no point was a composer thinking "Ok, so this is the fundamental voice-leading note here, and these other notes are not, and this fundamental note connects to this fundamental ...


5

Look what the score is doing: you have an oscillation rising from F♯ in the initial RH part, moving up to C♯, but artfully dodging A♯. At the same time, you have an accompaniment that consists largely of the fifth D-A alternating with the auxiliary notes E-G. The entire section is acting like an elaboration of a D major chord in a kind of quasi-Lydian ...


5

I'm going to give a very cursory simplification for the answer because asking about Lydian Chromatic theory is just like asking about Set Theory or Serialism. Lydian Chromatic Concept Theory basically asserts that the lydian scale is more closely aligned to the natural, universal properties of sound than the conventional major scale. It explains and ...


5

They exist. You may not know where to look for them. Odd-time signatures (rhythms in 5, 7, 11, 13, etc.) are common in certain cultures. Odd-time signature songs and dances can be readily found in folk music from places like Greece, Bulgaria, and Turkey, and other nations in that geographic region, going back to antiquity. The use of odd-time meters and ...


5

"it seems to me like dissonance can be used like a theme for music." What is the proper understanding of the use of dissonance in composition? First off, dissonance is the general term for a clash or tension in a single chord or sound, such as one might have playing a half step (minor second) or a tritone (diminished 5th, augmented 4th). Consonance, its ...


5

Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


5

Elaine Gould's excellent book Behind Bars includes a section on humming which gives three options for notation: Humming is indicated by a verbal instruction hum or bocca chiusa, abbrev: b.c. (Italian, 'mouth closed'). It is important to place the instruction above the stave, so that the singer does not articulate it as if it were sung text (a). Where ...


5

No, it's absolutely not necessarily. It can certainly be helpful in a number of ways, but experimentation and perseverance can get you far. One example of an accomplished tone-deaf composer is Robert Fripp. It's not necessary to know exactly what note you're hearing to know that it sounds good! That test is hard. As the page says, "excellent musicians ...


5

If I understand you correctly, it should be something like this:


4

Minor seventh chords can typically be substituted whenever adding a diatonic 7th (the 7th that is within the current key) to a minor triad leads to a minor seventh. In a major key, this occurs for ii7, iii7 and vi7. In a minor key, this occurs for i7, vi7 and v7. So for instance, if you have a chord progression, like I-iii-vi-ii-V, you could add 7th to ...


4

but is reading the bass clef necessary? Rhythm seems rather useless also. Cough, cough. In baroque times, accompaniment was written down by writing down the bass line and rhythm and putting numbers for the type of chord/harmony to be played above the bass line. While the numbers are gone these days and replaced by explicitly writing out the right hand, ...


4

Some notes sound good together. This is an example of what we call consonance. Some notes do not sound good together. We call that dissonance. In simple terms, certain notes blend well together because of the way the sonic frequencies merge together and complement one another. Our brains will instinctively have a desire to gravitate towards complementary ...



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