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https://wmich.edu/musicgradexamprep/NonChordTones.pdf I think that 3 sources can help to clear up this question, that is H Helmholz, J.Rameau and fake-books in which You ought to analyze only acknowledged works. H. Helmholtz explained dissonances by interaction of chord's partials with near frequencies. Long before Helmholtz didn't dispose by this ...


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No rules, but some models. Look at pieces titled "Sonata" from Mozart and Beethoven. I won't analyse their structure for you - anyone considering writing an extended piece of music is surely quite capable of doing that for themself - but note that a piece of music of any length NEEDS a structure. Use the classic Sonata Form if you will, or use something ...


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The word "sonata" may refer to different things. In the Baroque period a sonata was just an instrumental piece (like Scarlatti's sonatas). I suppose, though, that the OP may be referring to the term applied to the classical period, in which case it can have two different, although related, meanings: 1) The sonata-allegro form, usually simply abbreviated ...


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I can relate to your situation. I am a songwriter/composer as well and I am decent on guitar - but totally lousy on drums. So I rely on sampled loops in my Boss BR800 Multi Track recorder that I can adjust the tempo and add fills, and endings and variations. The software will even let me create custom drum tracks from the existing loops/samples. ...


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I forced myself to learn (on a Boss drum machine in the 80's) from drummer's books. These books are not that expensive. Search Amazon for instance - there are a few that have hundreds of patterns and can keep you busy for a while. You can learn so much that way. You can also find drum tabs online. Sites such as this - http://drumbum.com/drumtabs. ...


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Depends quite a lot on genre. I'll explain my normal process as they vary so much you can't define a method. 1: Melody/Chords/Sound design Depending on what I come up with first, this almost defines my process. Most often this is sound design and least often a melody, however, as difficult as it is to start with a melody, these bring out the best results ...


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All these take practice. I usually start with whatever comes to mind, maybe a chord pattern, a melodic hook, or even a string of patterns. I like to start with lyrics but other people like to start with melodies.


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Sure, even within limits of the most traditional tonal harmony, you naturally have some major and some minor (and one diminshed, to be thorough) chords within a major tonality. let's take for example the tonality of C major, and produce the natural (more properly "diatonic") chords (more properly, "triads") contained in this tonality, one per degree of the ...


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I am author of the site ,, Synesthesia interactive music visualization", which is at least good visible in Internet . Now I think that instead synesthesia music visualization must take in bearings such firmly asserted phenomena as conditional reflex, prediction,expectation, satisfaction. In a matter of fact namely these phenomena are referred to my program. ...


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First you should start with what key you want your music to be in - maybe a major key if your song is a Pop song. Then, you need to work out how many beats in a bar your music is going to have: 4/4, 3/4, 8/8? Now, to compose the melody of your music, imagine how you want your music to be. I can't help you with your melody, because you are the only one who ...


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Some good suggestions in other answers, I'd suggest in addtion that you take an online course, as there are quite quite good ones and freely available on MOOC plataforms such as Coursera and edx. For your situation the course Developing Your Musicianship (from Berklee college), available in both plataforms, seems a particularly suited starting point.


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I appreciate that you're interested in learning an instrument. Well, choose an instrument that you wish to play, I feel it might be little easier for you to find books on how to play that instrument after you find that out. If you want to learn basics of music, this website http://www.musictheory.net/ would be really helpful as the lessons are taught with ...


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I fear that your question is so broad that it might well be put on hold, or you might be asked to make your question a bit narrower, but have a possible recommendation: Hindemith's book - "Elementary Training for Musicians" would certainly enable you learn all the basics of music, such as rhythm, notation, scales etc. It is a tough book to work through, ...


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Put the name of the composer (perhaps in a smaller font or in parenthesis) under the name of the song. Maybe right justified so as not to dominate.


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Here's the test - ask a bunch of brass players to first sight-read a passage with n sharps in the key signature and then a different passage of similar difficulty with n flats in the key signature. Count the number of errors for each performance and collate the results. My expectation (contrary to the received wisdom quoted in the OP) is that the accuracy ...


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Adding to the narrative in other answers, here is a chart that might help further explain why brass players tend to prefer sheet music written in keys with flats. As is shown, written keys that exclude the “worst-to-play usual notes” (elaborated below) on common brass instruments (except French horn) are overwhelmingly keys with flats. This is ...


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A pragmatic answer: if there is a way to notate that repeats are to be played on D.C. or D.S., it is not well known. I'm not saying there is no such standard, only that it is not widespread. The best you can do is to write it out: "D.S. with repeats", or "D.S con repetizione" if you prefer italian.


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I'm assuming your question is about arranging the non leading voice parts. If you don't know even where to start I suggest a 4 part harmony homophonic approach in the classic way. Whole volumes have been written on this subject only, but a simple basic approach is not so hard if you know your way around basic chords and scales. 4 part harmony assumes 4 ...


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The "sound/tone/timbre" of the instruments and the atmosphere created by them give music a certain personality. For soundtracks, the context of the movie gives personality to the music. Other than this, I think it is an individual that gives personality to the music. That is, it also depends on what mental and physical state you are in. As already mentioned, ...


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Yes any piece written in they key of f# pentatonic will only use the black keys on the piano. That is actually how I teach people how to figure out the notes of the pentatonic scale. If you start on f# the key will only have the notes of the black keys on the piano.


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You really have two questions there. I'm going to answer this one: In a section like the chorus, how do you get the layering of many instrument to get that full and rich impression? Playing a bunch of instruments at the same time can easily lead to a big mess, even when the instruments are playing compatible notes. Playing the exact same thing on the ...


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This is more of a producing problem I think. To get a rich and wide sound there are a lots of things that come into play. The easiest suggestions to implement are checking the stereo-image and using reverb wisely.


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Practise, practise, practise, practise some more, a little bit of practise and then practise! In reality, that's the best way to improve and it comes with time, but if you want some immediate help, start learning some basic music theory. That'll help you get on track with song structure, key signatures, time signatures, etc. Good luck!


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The other upvoted answers here are good and I don't want to repeat them, but I think that there is a lot to add. Surely the key of C-Sharp Major must exist! So why is it never or rarely used? There are several factors that need to be taken into consideration. Here I list a few: Historical To understand modern scales you need to look at how they ...


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I'm painting with a broad brush here, but I think that keyboard and guitar players do tend to think differently about how a tune is created. One way to write a tune is to start with a chord progression and a rhythmic feel, and then weave a melody over the top. Sometimes the melody is more rhythmic than melodic with repeating notes of the same pitch. Whilst ...


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Shorter answer: Every note in a scale must be named A, B, C... etc. in ascending order but with as many accidentals like sharp and flat as necessary. Therefore, the note before C# (major 7th) is B sharp (the same as C natural), and E# (same as F natural) is the third which is annoying to work with.


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In the classical sector, there is Chopins etude for the black keys, G flat major, op. 10, no. 5, cf youtube for sound and imslp for the score.


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You have stumbled across the PENTATONIC SCALE. Of which there are two - major and minor. Ascending, by starting on F#/Gb, you have the major pent., start on D#/Eb and it's the minor. The five notes (hence pent!) work well and harmoniously together, with nothing that clashes (is dissonant). These notes work well together, as the 'avoid notes' as we call ...



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