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I have been researching modes recently and 'The Concise Explanation of Church Modes' by CC Spencer was recommenced as a place to start my research. According to Spencer each plagal mode and its harmonizations' were "ruled" by the modes corresponding authentic scale. For instance while Hypo-Dorian would start a fourth below the opening tone of D it would ...


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What you call "layers," the rest of the music world calls "arrangement." And yes, genres of music are built around distinct commonalities of arrangement.


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In principle you could use the Italian marking "M.S. solo" meaning literally "Left hand only". But "Solo" might be read with a different meaning (i.e. "this piece is for one player"), even though that would seem to make little sense in your context. I think you would be better using a full sentence in your native language, either in the title or at the start ...


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bottom staff defaults to left hand unless otherwise notated. as does top to RH.


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The rule you are citing only holds for chromatic figures. If you have changed keys, then you use accidentals that match the new key. If you are using a chromatic figure to move to the new key, then follow the rules for a chromatic figures until you finally arrive in the new key, where you then use accidentals that match the key. For example:


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I started looking into melodies that I've transcribed and found a few common themes such as: -7th degree always resolves to the 1st, 3rd or 5th degree of the scale -4th is most commonly resolved to 5th -The melody can end on a 2nd or 6th degree without too much tension You should certainly be thinking about things like that, so long as you ...


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If you're using a Mac system, then I would definitely recommend Logic Pro X. Logic Pro X is intuitive and it works wonders for looping and composing. It's quite simple to loop and audio or MIDI file within Logic and then you can easily transcribe it or compose some music while the loop is playing. Logic Pro X can output to MIDI or an audio file, so if you ...


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If you're a beginner composer, I do not recommend thinking about these things while composing. Music Theory is very important to learn, but more often than not, breaking the rules can sound great and lead to very interesting compositions. However, to break the rules, you should first know the rules. I suggest if you're just getting started with composing ...


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I've never used this feature, but Sibelius has support for syncing with the ReWire protocol. This enables you to run Sibelius and a DAW (such as Ableton Live) on the same computer simultaneously and in sync. So you could play audio loops in Ableton Live in sync with playback of Sibelius notation and its virtual instruments, and quickly go back and forth from ...


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You will find that melodies that are "pleasingly consistent to genre" tend to also follow the "rules" of composition. The rules are empirically derived: meaning that they were derived from common practice, instead of common practice being derived from the rules. It is a very good practise to come up with a pleasing melody, then transcribe it, and review ...


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If you are writing two-voice species counterpoint according to Fux's rules, and the cantus firmus is in the bottom voice and that bottom voice descends by step to the final in the Phyrgian mode--that is, the bass moves down a minor second from F to E in an untransposed mode; then the upper voice in two-voice counterpoint sings D--E, because the final ...


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Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


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It's called either a "vamp" or a "coda"


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When writing a poem, do you come up with the words or the metric and rhyme structure first? Trying to enforce any particular order seems weird to me. Composition is an incremental process without inherent fixed order. If you try breaking down how Bach worked on the Musical Offering, he obviously started with a melodic fragment, the motif. And then went ...


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To suggest that any single method of writing is "the" method would be ridiculous. Melody and harmony are, after all, two sides of the same coin (in a manner of speaking). Melodies imply harmonies, and harmonies imply melodies.


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http://www.music.indiana.edu/department/composition/isfee/ It's important to know not just the ranges, but how the instruments operate in each part of their range. This site has real demos alongside the written music and fairly thorough explanations of the techniques available. I've seen a lot of resources like this and this is the only one I have no ...



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