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0

The bad news is that at first there is going to be drill drill and then some more drill; the good news is that you will be able to able to finish this drill [of chords} in less than two months if you practice daily for not more than 5 minutes. [Yes 5 minutes ....it is not a misprint]. I believe you have a good Ear Training app; learn the chords [major and ...


8

It's a key change: it changes from E minor to C# phrygian without preparing the listener. That's probably why the beginning of the solo sounds dissonant to you, i.e. dissonant in relation to what came before. Unexpected (i.e. unprepared) key changes will always have such an effect. The more notes change from one key to the other, the stronger the effect ...


0

If you are still referring to bar 5 of Fig. 14 p. 36. then I guess that the B of the cpt is flattened due to the F of the previous bar in the c.f. Although this is not mentioned in this book, the devil in musica is to be avoided even when it is singed by different voices. This is also the case when dealing with more voices if the tritone is formed in the ...


2

All music styles are overlapping hybrids, so you consistently find elements of one in another. However, there are identifiable characteristics of American Country Music, as long as you understand you will often see those very characteristics in blues, rock and roll and other popular forms with a common heritage. Probably the most prominent feature would ...


0

Typical Hints or the Effective Writing of Melodies: Realise that melodies are often just small rhytmical idea with slight variations or elaborations on the main theme. Choose a theme and make this theme part of the whole structure of the song. (See Ravels Bolero to see how one rhythm can be elaborated on with great effect.) Know your chord progressions. ...


1

You mentioned you are tired of the same old chord progressions in your post. Those chord progressions are tools to create direction, so that's why they are used so much. If you want to write pop, country, etc that will relate to everyday listeners, listen to how these chord progressions work in other songs. The key is the melody and lyrics. I believe you ...


3

TLDR; Listen to new music, play in new keys, try to emulate other styles/genres, choose new chord progressions and approach your writing from a different perspective, ie, which instrument you write on, both for accompaniment and melody. What you are experiencing is entirely normal. As humans we have managed to survive and evolve due to our recognition of ...


1

I encountered a similar situation as you. It's hard to "think outside the box" when you are "in the box" trying to compose music at that very specific moment. What I mean is that the best music ideas/tunes come when you are not trying to force yourself to come up with a composition idea. They key thing is here is that you need to have the ability to quickly ...


3

Find a collaborator. Even if it's just temporary. They will have a different perspective. Work in a different genre. Listen to really different music from what you're used to (such as music from the Middle East, folk music from Bulgaria or Finland, Indian music - stuff that doesn't use the 12-tone scale or 4/4 rythms)


4

I am surprised this hasn't been a response yet... STOP Put your instrument down and take a break. Go for a walk and collect yourself. How a musician spends his time away from his instrument is equally as important as how he does with it in front of him. Sometimes you can listen to too much music. A couple days without playing or listening to music can be ...


4

Use a random number generator to come up with new chord progressions. If you play guitar, put your fingers at random spots on the fretboard and see what happens. If you play piano, put your fingers on random keys and see what happens. Listen to your favorite song backwards. Listen to your least favorite song backwards. Write out the sheet music for one ...


3

Analyze what you do. Write it down. What tempos are you used to? What rhythmic patterns do you use the most? Do you tend to repeat the same intervals? Take those melodies that made you feel repetitive. Why are they similar? You will find out exactly what your clich├ęs are. They probably come from your influences. These similar lines come out of you musical ...


2

Whenever a neat (and hopefully original) melody pops into my head, I quickly record it (no matter how sloppily), just to get it down. I keep a "library" of these melodies, and when writing, I refer to them and use whichever ones seem to go with the song. Oftentimes (when composing on the guitar, that is), I will take whichever scale/key I'm working in, and ...


2

try avoiding using the tonic (if you're writing a melody in the key of G, stay off of the note G as much as possible try using non-standard chord shapes/inversions (if you're instrument is a guitar, capo higher than normal - 6th or 9th fret) avoid standard chord progressions (I-IV-V, I-iii-IV-V, etc...) get lots of rest stay up until you're exhausted ...


2

By restricting yourself. Taking inspiration from new sources. For instance, You can try to write a song that has a particular structure. You can try writing in a style that is new for you. If you have a fledgling song idea that needs to be fleshed out, you can try to emulate a specific artist or use specific genre conventions. You can do this for ...


14

Listen, listen, listen to lots of new kinds of music. Regularly. Not just your style or your favorites. Don't just listen. Marinate. Challenge yourself. It'll be tough initially, and it may not hold your attention, but the exercise does pay off. You'll start to hear things "out of the box" that you didn't before and you'll have fresher perspectives on your ...


7

I'm reminded of how the sci-fi author, Lois McMaster Bujold, keeps her books moving along: "What's the worst thing that can happen to the protagonist now?" You, of course, don't want to write the worst thing, but you do want something that will a) give you a hook to work with, and b) keep the song hopping, and that means a very similar way of working. The ...


7

You know what used to work for me? Take the chords off a popular song and write to those. Or take the rhythm of a melody and see how it works with other chords - maybe in another mode. You know the Mickey Mouse March? Dam-dadam, dam-dadam, dam-dadam-dadam? Nice, now find an interesting sequence of chords. In minor, even. Now try to come up (in your ...


1

I recommend starting with a physical pencil and blank staff sheet. It feels laborious, but it puts you in a more intimate contact with the activity. Write up a discrete section - 8 or 16 bars - then enter it into your program. Hit replay and you will see how well you did. Correct it and go back to your paper. Slow at first, this will get you humming. You ...


1

It all depends on context. In some cases, when there is no instrument playing chords to provide harmony, the first few notes of the melody will imply it, and this will dictate how a particular note would sound. If you drastically change these notes so they imply another harmony, the first seconds may sound funny, just before it all makes sense as a change. ...


1

Music is not just a melody (unless we are talking chant, but even that works on a harmonic framework) but also consists of harmonies which structure the notes into subunits. Those harmonies are a bit layered: you can even have things like an organ point where one aspect (bass note) can stick around for a long time and form the root for a harmonic framework. ...


0

Intervals that can be expressed as small integer ratios, such as 2:1 (octave), 3:2 (perfect fifth), 4:3 (perfect fourth), 5:4 (major third), 6:5 (minor third), usually do not sound bad together or in a sequence. But you cannot rely just on this when creating music.


1

The word you are looking for is transcription; this is the act of taking a melody (or other musical part) and writing it down in musical notation. The process for doing it better is by using ear training -- the ability to recognize various aspects of music (such as scale degree, intervals, harmonies, and rhythms) from just hearing it. There are already ...


2

Learn to walk. The great thing is that it allows me to recognize one note at a time by ear... but I am very slow with this process. And I can't describe how frustrating it is. There is no magic mind reader. As with anything we do, practice makes perfect. It may be frustratingly slow at first, but with persistence, the process will speed up. Cannot run ...


1

Survival in the wild, and pattern-matching Why do we have ears in the first place? It's for survival. The ears (and the rest of the auditory system) are supposed to tell us what's going on in the world. Rockin' Cowboy mentioned the Basilar Membrane, which is able to do a real-time spectral analysis of the sound. However, a full spectrogram would be a lot of ...


2

On the piano, your "reach" is sorted by pitch. On the guitar, it arranged "functionally" where notes one or several fourths (or third) apart are in close proximity. So the guitar has certain chord voicings and shapes where you can put down your left hand and run a non-trivial picking pattern through the right hand, resulting in a fractured fill-in of the ...


4

Some notes sound good together. This is an example of what we call consonance. Some notes do not sound good together. We call that dissonance. In simple terms, certain notes blend well together because of the way the sonic frequencies merge together and complement one another. Our brains will instinctively have a desire to gravitate towards complementary ...


2

This is a great question with a VERY broad answer and a lot of opinions on the matter, but I'll sum up my view: When we talk about how notes work together, we can discuss them in two dimensions: the harmony (all the sounding notes at any sample point in time; the "vertical" dimension) and the melody (A rhythmic sequence of notes across time; the ...


3

If your question is about coming up with good melodies, then I think there are a few starters. Out of the 12 notes in an octave, any permutation and combination of notes can generate music. However, there are pre-defines scales(in western) or Ragas(in indian classical) that define a specific set of notes. If you limit yourselves to those notes, then there ...


3

I don't mean which instrument they are played on I think the instrument is a big part of it. Pianos can play way more notes at a time. Stomp the hold pedal and you can play a lot more strings than a guitar player can. The piano has a full 88 notes of range. It takes 2 or 3 guitars to cover A0 .. C8. The guitar lets you bend notes, and fiddle with ...


10

Just a few ideas: A keyboard instrument provides a lot more freedom in terms of the number of notes that can be sounded together and the distance between them. It's difficult on a guitar to play a fluidly moving bassline and a chord pattern two octaves above; it's trivial on a piano. The sustain mechanism of a piano allows for all notes to sustain at once; ...


0

Don't worry too much about music theory yet. Start off by learning music notation. If your goal doesn't include improvisation, why do you need to know what scales fit what chords?


1

In my experience, here are the essentials: Progressions. Know your I, IV and V chords for all major keys cold. If not for all keys, in all the common keys you play: E, A, D, G, C or whatever else you do. Relative minors (minor vi chords) are probably just as important. Scales. There are dozens of kinds of scales, but majors and minors are essential and ...


2

First off, you need to understand what music theory actually is. Wikipedia defines it as: Music theory considers the practices and possibilities of music. It is generally derived from observation of how musicians and composers actually make music, but includes hypothetical speculation. Most commonly, the term describes the academic study and ...


4

but is reading the bass clef necessary? Rhythm seems rather useless also. Cough, cough. In baroque times, accompaniment was written down by writing down the bass line and rhythm and putting numbers for the type of chord/harmony to be played above the bass line. While the numbers are gone these days and replaced by explicitly writing out the right hand, ...


2

What are some of the essential music theory concepts to memorize? If the subject matter is taught in a intellectually engaging manner then it is rarely needed to make theory an issue of memory. I'm confident in reading the treble clef, but is reading the bass clef necessary? Yes. you will find it useful to be able to read bass sheet music. ...


1

C minor chord might be worth considering, especially for the ending. This makes a cool chord progression of C - Cm - G. (which is IV-iv-I in the key of G).


2

It is more essential to be able to hear (recognize exactly) and to sing everything you learn than to memorize it. Music theory is only a structured way of thinking about music. If you are not able to hear what you are thinking about then it is merely words and ideas, not music. Learn to hear and sing intervals, then 3 and 4 note chords, then chords with ...


1

Following the two excellent answers, Im7 can be used in place of I7, leading, as it usually does to IV. As in C - Cm7 - F. The Cm7 can come over as Eb6, but by keeping the root at the bottom, it works as a dominant of F. Example found in 'The Lady Is a Tramp'. That change from C to seemingly a non-diatonic chord a minor third above can appear subtle and 'in ...


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Casey's answer is fundamental and should be thoroughly understood. When you're ready to go farther afield, you can use other closely-related minor 7th chords. Consider this chord progression: I-I7-IV-V7-I. The I7 is a "secondary dominant", the "V7 of the IV" chord. It gives a stronger feeling of "fourness" to the IV chord. Now, if you wanted to more ...


4

Minor seventh chords can typically be substituted whenever adding a diatonic 7th (the 7th that is within the current key) to a minor triad leads to a minor seventh. In a major key, this occurs for ii7, iii7 and vi7. In a minor key, this occurs for i7, vi7 and v7. So for instance, if you have a chord progression, like I-iii-vi-ii-V, you could add 7th to ...


1

You can think of it in terms of sets of notes making a chord: Write out your notes (a,b,c). Most melodies 'feel' as though they have a "home note" or key - a note that they want to 'resolve' to. If you can identify that, write that down too. It may/may not actually be in the melody. If possible trim it down to three or so notes whcih are at the heart of ...


1

I always start with the drums. The drum track will serve as a metronome (or click track) to keep the entire arrangement at a consistent tempo and form a framework for all the other instruments that follow. Since you have a melody in mind, search for a pre-arranged drum pattern that best fits the groove that you want for your song. Adjust the tempo ...


1

I was once just like you, or in a similar position. I'm not claiming expert knowledge or anything, but I can tell you what I did: 1) First, I found a book at the library that explained basic piano chords. (not just a list of piano chords, but like one that explained them AND had a reference section). I already had a basic knowledge of piano, so I knew ...


1

Melodies often include notes from the chords that go with them. Try this: Pick out/separate the notes in the melody in to bars or measures (timing units of the music that is often but not always in 4 beat units). Select the chords that combinations of these notes would suggest (build chords using these notes). Not all of the notes will fit a single chord, ...


3

The others are spot on in saying that learning some music theory is the best way to be good at this, but I think I can help you with a simple technique on piano to find some chords that work together. I should stress that this is method will limit the chords available to you, and limit you to just a few keys, but limiting yourself can be great for ...


4

The best way is for you to practice a bunch of simple songs - folk tunes, Christmas carols, children's music - learning the chords to these songs. This will train your ear as to the appropriate ways of using chords. There is no software which will add chords to a tune because for any particular melody different chord progressions can be used, it's partly ...


2

you'll want to learn music theory which explains how people have gone about writing music through the ages. But for now, start easy. Let's say your keysig is C (your melody uses the white piano keys). Start with the C, F, and G chords. C has c,e,g. F has f,a,c. G has g b d. If your melody spends most it's time on e, you'll want the C chord. If your ...


1

I don't believe there is some magical trick you can use to get past the wall you're facing. Unfortunately, you just need to write a lot of music, and your first songs aren't going to be very good. Writing good music is hard, and it takes experience. I'm a programmer myself, and I can tell you it's comparable in difficulty to programming. When you started ...


0

You would use what is called a pivot chord. So some of the more common modulations include To the relative key. If you are in a minor and after a Imperfect Cadence which ended on the chord (E-G#-B) you would at the very least need a chord that has the A so the leading tone resolves. A good chord to choose next would be the Sub Mediant chord of the C ...



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