New answers tagged

0

Good luck with your software. Your list is rather incomplete, as it only lists majors and minors. (I'm not sure how much this matters but you should definitely be aware of this limitation.) On the other hand you seem to be aware that B# major for example is essentially never used as it needs five double sharps. Most "black note" keys use whichever of ...


0

Musique Concrete is a whole genre that no concept of key.


0

I recall one based on ascending and descending the chromatic scale. Having only heard it and never seen the sheet music I can't say what note it started on. Let's just say the music was different. Incidentally, there were no chords in the piece at all.


1

This is actually not a simple question, but neither do the answers give an accurate picture of historical practice during the common practice period. The Beethoven Fifth is a good example: we regard it as a "C-minor symphony" because its first movement is in C minor. Within that movement, C minor is, as we often say, the tonal center: it's the key to which ...


0

If you know the basics of reading music, you could probably get a score of any piece written before 1900 from the IMSLP and quickly page through it looking for key changes. For example, if you scan the score for Beethoven's Fifth, the first movement is in C minor, the second movement is in A-flat major, the third movement has sections in both C major and C ...


6

It's not clear what your goals and requirements are for this information system -- and that has a huge bearing on the answer. If, for example, your software is trying to analyze the harmony inside of a single piece, then yes, symphonies definitely will modulate (change keys) all over the place, as Wheat Williams describes in his excellent answer. And this ...


0

If a symphony has the key "C Minor", can it also have another key? I think the misconception you are having is that certain instruments are transposing by their nature. The Bb clarinet for instance when it plays a C what you are actually hearing is a Bb. So if the strings play in C major, the Bb clarinet would have its score written in D Major. This is ...


6

Every symphony ever written has more than one key -- usually several different keys. A symphony may have the name of a certain key in its title, but this only refers to the main key that occurs throughout its structure. Each symphony will have many changes to different keys. Each symphony will tend to be unique in how it uses multiple keys. Different ...


1

A composition like "Symphony in C minor" refers to a key in the piece, with which key the composition starts and with which it ends. There is a certain number of notes and chords in that key, so if a whole composition was built only on that key, it would sound repetitive. That's why during the composition changes keys. Usually it's more than one, but it ...


1

Speaking as a college trombone player, this passage should be able to be played without much trouble. What the player will need to do is play the Db in 5, the C in 6 and the Bbs in the first measure in trigger flat 3rd, then in 1st on the second measure. So the positions would be: (5 6 Tb3 Tb3 1 1 1) (5 6 Tb3 Tb3 1 1 1) (5 6 Tb3 5 5 6 Tb3 5) (5 6 Tb3 6 5 6 ...


2

Here You can view the full score and individual parts for a Haydn symphony. Look particularly at the Horn parts to see how sections of rest are handled.


0

There are more ways to do this than you can shake a stick at. I'll detail my way. Your mileage will vary - that's as it should be - but I'll be leading up to some points that should be relevant to you. I generally come up with a melodic idea first, which I work out as a theme or as a contrapuntal subject (depending on the nature of the idea) - my tendencies ...


0

I recommend you don’t abandon your current methodology, but just build on it for now. A key thing is you haven’t really written anything until you write the song down. You literally have to fix your song in a medium to have written it. Playing it and keeping it in your head doesn’t even legally get you copyright on it. So you need to choose some method of ...


1

There really isn't a set process on composing as it is much more of an art than a science. I don't think I've ever used the same process twice when composing a piece especially since every piece is different in nature as you don't want to just write the same piece over and over again. Sometimes I have a nice melody or riff that kicks off the composition, ...


1

I'm with you on the not interrupting the flow of ideas. I am sure there may be composers who think about music from a different perspective and might find it easier to sketch out their ideas on paper. Maybe that's the way their ideas flow. I admire folks who can start writing notation (using a computer these days) and know what it will sound like before ...


0

I do it the way I was taught to do 4-part harmony. If there are words, write out the words. Write out the melody; figure out the harmony; write the bass part and notate the harmony; add the inner voices. Rinse and repeat within any step or across all steps. As you go you will discover structural similarities you want to exploit, think of alternative ...


2

Firstly, if you've managed to (more than once) focus your efforts to make a finished piece, you're obviously doing something right! There are a lot of people with considerable musical talent and ambition who hardly ever manage to get round to finishing anything, so you obviously know something some of us could learn from. One thing to consider now and again ...


4

I do not believe there is any kind of standard procedure for composing, inspiration can come from anywhere such as noodeling around and playing a cool riff or melody, hearing another song and getting an idea from it, a random melody just popping into your head while humming, using music theory, etc. there really is no right or wrong way to go about ...


-2

The old adage still applies, perhaps more than ever: you can't polish a turd. The reason why jazz musicians don't play pop songs is that unlike the blues and American Songbook, pop songs do not have well constructed melodies which naturally suggest sophisticated harmonies. Over the past 50 years I have written well over 1000 arrangements. Some of which I ...


0

Ableton offers a trial version for around $49, It has some limitations but you can do a good bit of composing in it before running out of trackspace. This entry level edition comes free with a lot of inexpensive controllers as well, such as launchpad mini. Akai has a similar product that comes bundled with some of their controllers, its called ignite. It ...


1

You can use ReWire to essentially turn the basic version of Ableton Live into a plug-in that runs inside Logic. This is a very common way to use Live inside Logic or Pro Tools. Typically it is done for exactly the reason you describe: to add the Session View to an existing studio. If you have Logic, you don’t need Live Suite, because you already have “Logic ...


1

The following is lifted directly from http://www.misswardmusic.com/caribbean.html Calypso: Originally the national dance of Trinidad and Tobago, calypso is particularly associated with carnival. It has: 4/4 time with syncopation acoustic and bass guitar or band with trumpets, saxophones, electric guitars, drum kit and Latin percussion often uses ...


2

One of the other answers gives a mixture of traditional ornaments like trill and mordent along with "passing tones." It's a nice list, but "passing tones" are only one type of "non-chord tone" (NCT) and I think a fuller list of NCT's should be given: Passing Tones Neighbor Note Suspension Anticipation Appoggiatura Escape tone Cambiata (or changing tones) ...


0

I know this thread is old, but for people who find it via Google I want to add this article. It is fairly easy to read (theory-wise) and well researched. David Temperley, The Melodic-Harmonic Divorce in Rock http://theory.esm.rochester.edu/temperley/papers/temperley-pm07.pdf The gist of the paper is rock music has two melodic modes: one where the melody ...


0

Chords that include the tritone - in G7 that's the F and B - have a pull towards resolving the F to E and the B to C. Hence G7 as the "dominant 7th" of C major. Where there is no tritone, though there's always an overall pull towards "home", the tonic note/chord, it's less insistent. You needn't think of a maj7 chord "resolving", more of where ot might ...


3

Some chord sequences to explore starting with Emaj7, these may help you to start to develop a vocabulary of sequences that work: Emaj7 - E6 - F#m7 - F#m+6 Emaj7 - F#m7 - G#m7 - F#m7 Emaj7 - Fdim - F#m7 - Gdim - E/G# - G#/F# - C#m/E Emaj7 - C#m7 - Amaj7 - E/G# - A/C# - B/D# - C#/F - Fdim - F#m7 Emaj7 - Amaj7 - B - C#m - A - B/F# - E Obviously this is not ...



Top 50 recent answers are included