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0

You can, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's the simplest way to harmonize your melody (notes sung) to the underlying chords. The next simplest way, and one that is pretty much guaranteed to not produce any dissonance, is to sing a note from the chord you're playing over. For the C chord, then, that would be C, E, or G. Beyond that, it's up to you. ...


7

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


1

One of my favorite sites to find sheet music and publish your own is MuseScore. MuseScore is actually a music notation software. I believe you have to use that software to upload to the site. The downside is that musescore.com isn't really a site that's reserved for composers who know what they're doing. My band director gets all sheet music for my band ...


0

When you are 19 it is never late for something. If you want to learn music theory and composition you have time until 25-30 after that you still can learn it but your advancing will slow down.


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I started college two years ago at 23 and despite the age difference between my peers and myself, we are all learning the same material at the same rate. Being 19, from my point of view, puts you ahead of the curve and I would strongly encourage you to get started yourself. So far it seems that you already have an impressive amount of prior experience which ...


7

Absolutely not late at all. Not only is it never late, but you are extremely young. I started learning classical music at the same age as you (I am currently 28), and I now compose and play piano and am starting music school as a hobby (late night after work classes). I did all my theory learning via self study. You can definitely find resources online. ...


0

Fundamentals of Musical Composition by Arnold Schoenberg, maybe. It was written specifically for undergraduate classes at about your level, and despite Schoenberg's fearsome Modernist reputation, it deals very strictly with tonal music with ample references to the music of the Classical and Romantic composers, and it's clearly written. At this point, I'd ...


3

Tim was partway there. It's not uncommon in movements that are in the minor to end in the major, not just a tierce de Picardie, but a coda in the major, or even a good part of the recapitulation: it's a way of resolving the tension inherent in the minor mode in common practice tonality. A finale in the tonic major is taking that sense of resolution up a ...


-1

The 'tierce de Picardy' is maybe your answer. It is known as the Picardy third, and is used to finish a minor piece , on the parallel major. Obviously, if the piece is 'xyz in D minor', the key signature is going to be one flat throughout it, unless there's a key change or modulation, but it'll probably gravitate back to D minor again. The 'different major ...



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