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1

C and Dm are both diatonic chords in C major. That is not dissonant. That consists of the notes C D E F G and A. That is what you might call a cluster. What you are experiencing is not some kind of auditory illusion; It is a physical phenomena. Beat frequencies are real things. They occur when two tones (or harmonics of tones) interact. If they are ...


7

I don't know of any published studies on this, but the basic cause is well known, and it is a fundamental limitation on the quality of sound reproduction. When you pan the two chords hard left and right, your two loudspeakers (or earphones) are acting as two independent (monophonic) sound sources. Human hearing is very good at locating the position of ...


3

First of all congrats to the OP for an intriguing and innovative idea. I don't know of any specific studies about this subject either, but I think that the reason why the two chords don't sound dissonant when separated left and right is the same as when they are separated by an octave, and the reason why (traditionally) we have 9th, 11th chords and not 2nd,...



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