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9

The lines illustrate the bracing... Special made wooden braces glued on the top and bottom of the guitar, inside the body of the guitar. Without bracing, the construction would not be strong enough for the tension of the strings and various forces/impacts from everyday useage. The bracing has an effect on how the top and bottom of the guitar vibrate in ...


7

I am not a drummer and I'm not affiliated with these folks, so if you down-vote, please tell me why in the comments so that I can improve my answers to this forum. Here's a site that tells you how to build drum shells either ply or stave. You'll have to have some woodworking chops however: http://pdgood.us/drumshed/buildmethods.html A ply drum shell is ...


4

If you have access to a looper pedal, such as the Boss RC series, they have a line in. Connect the pedal to the looper, and then your MP3 player to the line in of the loop pedal.


4

One reason is that it's bookmatched - the grain on one half matches that on the other. Another reason is that it would take a fair old tree to slice a piece of wood that size from it. Another is that the wood isn't exactly flat, so to bend one piece in the middle isn't an easy job. The grain on very expensive instruments is better matched than cheaper ones, ...


3

Most modern string instruments even down to violins (where the size of the slab is less of an issue) are. A single slab of wood is cut in two horizontally, and then opened like a book and then glued together. This is done since it is difficult (probably impossible for a bass) to find good single slabs of wood that are big enough for an entire body, but ...


3

The basic answer (which applies to carbon fiber stringed instruments too) is that our current understanding of materials science is insufficient to produce a material which exhibits as "flat", i.e. uniform frequency resonance curve as wood. Keep in mind that it takes a lot of skill to select proper wood -- there's a reason reed instruments are made ...


3

The Ghostnote online forum for drum builders is a great resource. You can search for particular topics. Some of the tutorials can only be accessed if you have a paid membership ($20 a year), but I've found lots of good info without it. The pdgood.us site mentioned is also good, but if you search Ghostnote for particular topics of interest you will likely ...


3

I'd have thought that merely plugging the player into the input would do the job. The volume can be attenuated via the gain pot on the amp., and also by the volume control on the player. Turn it down initially, as there will be a propensity for lots of sound. The speaker extension output - it may already be switched, and cuts out the internal speakers of the ...


1

The effects loop on a guitar amplifier is between the preamp (where the gain and EQ controls sit to modify the tone) and the power amplifier (which pretty much just makes everything louder). Your specific amplifier has a multi-channel tube preamp with a solid state power amp. As your amplifier has an effects loop, you can feed a non-guitar input in through ...


1

You can take a passive DI box and run it backwards, or get a specialized box called a ReAmp to do this.


1

To add to all the very good answers - consider reading a treatise on orchestration in your spare time. Ravel's and Stravinskij's are public domain, as is Rimskij-Korsakov's: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33900/33900-h/33900-h.htm I realize how absurdly wacky this sounds, especially since it's not exactly a light read, but in there are exposed some ...


1

There are a lot of opinions here justifying the keyboard layout in terms of being able to find notes by touch. Two remarks on that: for any serious kind of playing, there will be no time to grope around the keyboard. For another, things like chromatic button accordions don't offer any "find the diatonic scale" help. While some instruments use a different ...


1

I know this is an old thread, but I'd like to add something I think hasn't been mentioned much. In my younger days, I hated maple fingerboards purely out of looks. I just never was a fan of that bright looking fingerboard on guitars. I always have been a rock guy, blues and metal type music. So for me I always liked the looks of rosewood or ebony boards. I ...


1

I had my tone pot turned into a spin-a-split. This gives you control over how much you split the humbucker, from both coils full to fully split. I don't like how the pickup sounds in either of the extremes, so having this control is very useful.



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