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14

You need to consider the total weight of the piano (say 300 pounds / 135 kg for a small upright, up to 800 pounds / 350 kg for a full size grand) compared with a typical piece of wood furniture. When a piano is moved about by "non-professionals", there is the possibility that a lot of weight gets transmitted through the hinges on the lid and the fallboard ...


3

Piano hinges don't put much force on the individual screws and they can (depending on the build) be taken apart by pulling out the axle. The metal is pliable enough that there is nothing that would make a permanent buzz or noise or transmit a considerable amount of sound.


1

To add to all the very good answers - consider reading a treatise on orchestration in your spare time. Ravel's and Stravinskij's are public domain, as is Rimskij-Korsakov's: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33900/33900-h/33900-h.htm I realize how absurdly wacky this sounds, especially since it's not exactly a light read, but in there are exposed some ...


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It makes no difference to the sound or playability of an electric guitar whether you have rosewood or maple for the fingerboard. Did you know that the human eye has a blind spot that your brain fills in for you? Your hearing can be influenced by a number of factors. People lose high frequencies as they age. Volume changes what we hear and fatigue can set ...


1

I know this is an old thread, but I'd like to add something I think hasn't been mentioned much. In my younger days, I hated maple fingerboards purely out of looks. I just never was a fan of that bright looking fingerboard on guitars. I always have been a rock guy, blues and metal type music. So for me I always liked the looks of rosewood or ebony boards. I ...



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