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I can't offer a particular method, but you may find it interesting that Glenn Gould apparently could practice "mentally." I recall him saying this in an interview. Also, this Wikipedia page has some references about it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenn_Gould#Gould_the_pianist See the part near "It seems that Gould was able to practice mentally without ...


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The great pianist Walter Gieseking advocated using visualization techniques. One form of visualization (advocated by the pianist Walter Gieseking) is to study the score of the peice until you know it so well that you could sit down with a blank sheet of manuscript paper and write it out from memory. No simple undertaking! Gieseking even advised doing ...


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Playing in different keys: Guitar is an instrument where it's usually quite easy to transpose. Just move your hand up/down the fretboard one fret .. job done, unless there are open string chords. Keyboard isn't so easy. a transposition of 1 semitone means different fingering, etc. Songs are usually transposed to suit the vocalist, who may need things ...


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As a relatively inexperienced pianist/keyboard-ist in a band myself I had this same issue. Digital transposition was key at first, and still is to a great extent. I found my stage piano (Kawai MP7) had both an overall transposition setting, and a transposition setting per-setup, which allowed me to save the transposition along with the setups I used to ...


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What keys can you play in? You need to expand your horizons by extending your known technique to adjacent keys --- like keys, and unrelated keys. Do you know scales? If so, do you know "scales of chords"? That is, in C Major, your scale of chords is C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim, C. Learn those, and then learn their 1st and 2nd inversions. Then learn the ...


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Never trade-off music quality with unsufficient technique. Until you feel really comfortable with manual transpose always use digital transpose. Also when on your own, keep practicing for manual transpose all the time. You never know when you will really need it and have no other choice and time to prepare (some day you may have to do it on the stage on the ...


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Make the band aware of your instrument's limitations. For the purpose of this post I'm going to assume that your keyboard does not have a setting to enable it to transpose. This advice obviously applies to other instruments, particularly those that are only designed to play in one key, such as the tin whistle, bagpipes, and harmonica. Transposing 1 tone on ...


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The advice to get a digital piano that transposes easily given in other answers is excellent; when I played keys in a cover band once upon a time that's what I did. Learn the pieces in whatever key is convenient for you, and then change the setting on the keyboard before the song. Practice changing the keyboard settings. That's part of your instrument, and ...


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I admire your desire to want to be a part of a band and your willingness to try to improve your skills so you can make a valuable contribution. As far as transposing - you can spend many hours practicing and learning to transpose from any key to any other key. But then you won't have time to practice with or play in the band (or anything else in life). ...


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I note you have the tag "digital-piano". Does your digital piano have a transposition setting? Almost all of them do. That makes it easy, as long as you don't have "absolute pitch" and get confused when you play a C and hear a B. For acoustic piano players, transposition is a difficult but valuable skill. Almost everyone who accompanies singers will be ...



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