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You asked about costs. Keep in mind while the acquisition costs can be as low as the cost to move a real piano (you can get them for free) there are greater costs associated with maintenance and future moving of a real piano. You can be sure if the costs is low or free for a real piano, it will at the very least need to be tuned. That may cost $75.00 to ...


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From the view point of pure economics, electronic keyboard is probably unbeatable. Even if it would fail after some time, a year, you can buy a dozen of them the price of even cheap acoustic (cheapest electronic Yamaha NP 31 B - $ 315, cheapest acoustic Yamaha B1 PE - $4320, same shop). Only the most expensive electronic devices may cost that much, but the ...


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For a beginning piano student you can get by with a less expensive digital piano made by Williams, Yamaha or Casio. In order to better translate the feel to a real piano, you will want fully weighted keys that feel more like a real piano. Don't fall for the semi weighted - and touch sensitive is not the same as weighted. Since space is a concern, the ...


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If you are looking at used acoustic pianos, you can find them from anywhere from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars. For under $1000, the market is very much buyer beware. Unless you have access to an expert, or are buying from someone you trust to know the instrument’s history, and who tells you that the instrument has been well cared for and ...


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Both have pitfalls that can cause what looks like a good financial deal into a bad one. Electronic keyboards vary widely in key feel, and no matter how casual a player you may be, the more you vary from true piano action, the less satisfactory the key board will be. That said, there are some fairly economical models with decent key feel. Look for some used ...


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Which is more economical depends on the quality of the piano you want to get. You could buy a keyboard with piano sounds really cheaply. Reading you question it seems like you want to have something a little more serious though. If you want to get your hands on a piano very cheaply, you could check a site like Ebay/Craigslist. I don't know here you live, ...


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Oncosts for a studio piano will be more as it will need tuning at approx £40-£50 sterling ideally once or twice a year. The comparative costs of each is too subjective for any more in this answer.


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I just bought a Kemble cambridge which has a traditional piano sound but also the silent system. It's the perfect blend of 'real' piano and also has the option to plug in headphones to play digitally without disturbing anyone. It's a lot more expensive than a digital, but I wouldn't want to keep trying to improve my playing on the digital piano, when the ...


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Besides the weight that we can define as the amount of pressure needed, a real piano has a very large linear and angular momentum of its keys and inner mechanism. This is very hard to replicate without using material having the same weight as the original (which would make digital pianos very big and heavy). Digital pianos mostly replicate the pressure ...


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MIDI is a standard for carrying sound-related instructions like "start playing note 102 on channel 15 with velocity 187" from a producer (like a keyboard, a drum pad, or a sequencer in playback mode) to a consumer (like a hardware synthesiser, a software synthesiser, or a sequencer in record mode). So you really have two questions here: Can I buy a ...


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Many sample library plugins also work as a standalone program for performing or practicing. So, if you want to use your computer like a piano just for playing and practicing (not recording and producing...etc) you can just get a piano sample plugin which also works standalone. This way, you will not be dealing with an intermediary audio workstation. You can ...


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Well, your cheap piano very likely transmits only pitch information, not metronome beeps nor velocity information. So you can't really get high quality sound from your piano. However, you can get some good MIDI samples (buy them, find good ones online, ...) and then you get as good sound as your samples and PC speakers allow.


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No. Ardour and LMMS do not include a Midi expander (Midi->PCM, namely sound files) anyway, at least Ardour is Midi-in, Midi-out and you use it for recording/assembling tracks and sessions. So your sound quality depends on the quality of your Midi expander, and the freely available sound fonts are at best so-so. So that's the situation regarding the sound ...


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I've found that generally these sorts of keyboards, while weighted, are not as heavy as a real piano, but that's not always a bad thing. As long as they're weighted enough that you can feel the difference between playing piano and forte then you should be fine when switching to a real piano. One important thing to do while learning is using a variety of ...


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Yes, you can learn on that instrument. No, it is not exactly the same as a real piano.



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