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1

I have had real acoustic pianos and digital/electronic pianos. But due to moving more frequently I sold my acoustic piano about 7 years ago and now I have a Yamaha 88 weighted key piano that I can move by myself. I don't see why you can't keep the vintage Otto Halben as both a collectors item, and something you may want to have restored one day. But you ...


4

TL;DR If I were you, I would care only about the sustain, and made sure the piano and the pedal support more than just on and off states. Surely, if your son keeps practicing there will be a time when the other pedals will start to make a difference. However, you should think then about getting an acoustic piano. The three main pedals of the piano ...


2

On acoustic pianos, with three pedals, there is always the sustain pedal. It obviously works in a different way from that on a keyboard, but the effect is similar - it allows the notes just played to continue sounding when the keys are not still pressed down. On an acoustic, it allows some sympathetic vibration of any other strings to add to the sound.Some ...


8

I would differ from Wheat Williams’ answer. The sustain pedal is essential. A variable-resistance sustain pedal, often marketed as “half-damper”, will also make a world of difference: non-variable-resistance have an entirely different feel, and your son starts on those, then he will have to largely re-learn his sustain pedal usage when he gets to a real ...


2

This is not absolutely essential but it is helpful. The three pedals enable the musician to learn the techniques necessary to play with the pedals on a real acoustic piano. If you are going to spend money on a digital piano with all three pedals, make sure that the model you are buying has a feature called half-damper pedaling. Some of the brands of digital ...


1

I've played both types. The non-weighted GOOD keyboards are significantly easier for a non-pianist to play. The hammer-weighted actions are better if you want a touch-response (velocity) that emulates a real piano. Some people say the non-weighted or non-hammer-action are toys; they aren't. Some of them are very good (thinking of the Kawai K5000 keyboard ...


0

Pianos are constructed to performed highly nuanced music where everything depends on the proficiency of a performer that can apply a whole range of touche. Synthesisers are made to preform music that doesn't need nuances or any proficiency from the player – everything can be controlled by the envelopes of each synth or external controllers. The advantages ...


1

I would never ditch an acoustic piano, even a spinet. I move around a lot and live in small apartments so I'm stuck with a digital piano and every day I wish I had a real piano. I suppose your question is really an opinion question. My opinion is a bad acoustic piano is better than a good digital one.


3

Try asking at churches etc. to find who looks after their pianos. An acoustic pianos will tend to feel more responsive, if that's the term, than keyboard types, unless you pay thousands. Yours appears to be not a bad one, the broken pedal should be an easy fix - it looks like it's the one that operates the practice mode - very quiet - which could be ...


2

There is a lot of interest in isomorphic keyboards, where the same musical intervals are represented by the same 'shape' on the keyboard. Many of these are based on a two dimensional tiled layout of keys, where each direction represents an interval. Layouts include: Janko, where one key to the 'East' goes up two semitones, 'North East' is down a semitone, ...



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