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18

Yes. It has to do with the ratio of their frequencies. Essentially, the smaller the numbers involved the better. The perfect unison, with a 1:1 ratio (e.g., C played with the same C), has perfect consonance. C to the next G has a 2:3 ratio; the perfect fifth is the next most consonant. The minor second (e.g., C to C#) is the most dissonant in Western ...


14

Yes, there are ways to measure it, though there are many different algorithms claiming to be more accurate than the others. This formula by Vassilakis is recent (2007). These measure "roughness", which is similar to dissonance. (Dissonance is basically roughness, but weighted towards certain intervals due to cultural conditioning, which is obviously hard ...


9

This may be due to the interferences that the tone combination generates. When you tune in a string to another, you can hear a vibration getting slower as you approach unison. This effect is known as kick and the resulting interference is the difference between the two frequencies. According to wikipedia, differences above 15 Hz are not perceived as ...


8

Yes, you are correct! At least there is a physiological explanation. The construction of the human hearing apparatus causes a quality that is called critical bands. A critical band represents a bandwidth in which a sounding frequency has to be alone for us to hear or perceive it clearly. This bandwidth is, relatively speaking, increasingly wider for lower ...


5

The wikipedia entry for "non chord tones" turns out to be pretty good, with a lot of examples: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonchord_tone A passing note are the dissonants that are reached and left by stepwise motion in between chord tones that are typically a third or a fourth apart. They are typically short and on an unemphasized part of the beat (but ...


5

I would say the phrase "not at concert pitch" is the closest to being accurate and widely understood. Or, if you want to allow for those recordings that are close enough to play along to, "not close to concert pitch". Don't fall into the trap of believing that concert pitch is "right" and everything else is "wrong". Concert pitch is widely used, but ...


5

I find the Tavener and Whitacre to be very consonant-sounding and beautiful. On the other hand, the parallel fifths and fourths of Medieval organum sound unpleasant and jarring to me, although they probably sounded melodious and sweet to the original performers. I see two ways of interpreting your question. When did the use of dissonance change from ...


5

Beethoven, throughout his lifetime, created music that pushed the limits of tonality. In the classical period there were "rules" for how far you could push these limits, governed by contrapuntal techniques that evolved from the 16th century. In Beethoven's later works you begin to hear more and more dissonance. Musically speaking, it is agreed by most ...


4

The answers to both of these questions depends strongly on context. Obviously, any single note played in isolation won't sound functionally different from any other note played in isolation, so in order to give it functional meaning (as a 2nd or 5th or what have you) you need to play it in the context of a key. Consider that we're in the key of C major. The ...


4

As you have observed, parallel 5ths are not particularly musical. In fact, in the first semester of Theory I, everyone learns the important rule of harmonizing a melody and bassline: "NO PARALLEL 5ths!" In fact, I give you not one, not two, but three different memes (that I did not make) that detail this. (This page has some much more useful images.) You ...


4

I'd approach this as an application of counterpoint, where it's not always desirable to have the intermediate voices be a 5th above the bass. In strict counterpoint, you would typically construct parallel voices with a separation of a 3rd or a 6th up from the bass, this may fill out the harmony better than a 5th. This is in addition to the the answer ...


4

I'm also not a scholar on music history, but I think dissonance started to be taken into account with the continuous modulation Wagner used in his compositions. He is often seen as the father of chromaticism. After Wagner, we have Debussy. He created a brand new scale, the hexatonic scale (C D E F# G# A#) where the fundamental C chord (C E G) became a ...


4

There's a short answer and a longer, more complicated answer; I'll just give the short answer here along with the barest basics of the long answer. The short answer is: Yes, there is, sorta. If you take the ratio of the frequencies of the two pitches, you'll get some fraction in lowest terms. The smaller the numbers in that fraction, the more consonant ...


3

Using the empirical formula A+B divided by AB where A and B represent the frequency ratio of the two notes of that interval seems to give an absolute measure of the magnitude of the degree of consonance as follows Unison-frequency ratio 1:1 yields a value of 2 Octave-frequency ratio 2:1 yields a value of 1.5 Perfect 5th-frequency ratio 3:2 yields a value ...


3

Focus on the main downbeats of your melody. The rest you might have to turn into transition-focused points of your melody. To Reiterate: Yea, ok, A4, that's fine, but you will need to give something up, so focus on the important notes of your melody. Downbeats Longer-held notes (those with more duration) Hope this catches the point of your question.


3

Dissonance is highly subjective and relative to musical context. It is also commonly used as a source of tension in various kinds of music. Take, for example, a V7 - I chord progression. The dissonance between the 3rd and the 7th of the V7 chord (forming a tritone) creates a tension that we expect to hear a resolution for, by "relaxing" in the next, ...


2

The rules for a suspension are these: Suspended note precedes the suspending note, and therefore can't change until after the suspending note hits. A suspended note can repeat at point of suspension, but this is not typical. Suspending note has a consonant interval with the suspended note, then moves stepwise on a strong beat to a dissonant interval. This ...


2

The bVII or dominant bVII7 chord often comes from the mixolydian mode. Many bluegrass and rock and roll songs are written in the mixolydian and not in the major mode (or ionian mode, or major key, or major scale). In the key of C, the mixolydian scale is C D E F G A Bb C. So the chord is built on the note Bb in this mode. Since there is only one note ...


2

So, the chord sequence is maybe Cmaj / Bbmaj / Fmaj. The Bb is subdominant of the (subdominant of C) Fmaj. It's sort of reverse ii - V - I that jazzers are renowned to use.As actually many, many songs utilise. The Bb chord , in a way, is related to the key of C in a 'first- removed' manner.You're right in that the resolution is in 2 plagal cadences, so it ...


2

There is no "correct" when it comes to dissonance; it's a subjective phenomenon. If we're talking about a mathematical measure of dissonance, then the dissonance is the same in both cases since the ratio of the frequencies is the same. (See Is there a way to measure the consonance or dissonance of a chord?) I can guess at why it seems this way to you ...


1

It depends on the style of music. In modern jazz and blues, a dominant 7th chord can be an ending chord. So can a major 7th chord like C - E - G - B. Listen to the ending of "Le Boeuf sur le Toit" by Darius Milhaud.


1

In the cracks is pretty succinct! It isn't just speeding up or slowing down the recording - in the 60s, a band with just guitars and bass would merely tune to each other - there was no need for any more accurate reference - and make the recording. The Kinks had some tracks that were right in the middle of, for example, F# and G.I remember in the 60s, ...


1

Quite honestly, dissonance has been acceptable for as long as there have been non-octave harmonies. This may seem silly, but let's first define dissonance- any 2 or more notes whose overtones (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(music)) do not match up. This means any pair of non-octave, non-unison notes (non-octave and a fifth, non-2-octaves and a ...


1

There are degrees of dissonance, and over the course of music history, musical compositions became more tolerant of increasing degrees of dissonance and using more acute dissonance more often. It is a continuum. There was not an identifiable point at which any of this changed.



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