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6

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


5

It sounds like you are starting to study harmony and music theory, though. As you progress, things will start to make more sense to you. What makes Shostakovich select such dissonant notes freely? One way of looking at this: composers in a certain period or style eventually start to chafe with the rules of their period, and start to push the envelope. ...


4

Even if the b2 interval mentioned in Dan Davis's answer is avoided by using a different voicing, the problem that is usually meant in this context is the b9 interval between the major 7th and the (higher) root note. The b9 interval is considered a very dissonant interval which in traditional jazz harmony is only "allowed" on a dominant seventh chord ...


3

It looks like that bit of information has been in the article since it was written. From the original 2005 article: Often the melody note or other pitched phenomena influences which of the above chord types a performer selects. For example, if the melody note is the root of the chord, including a major seventh can frequently cause a harsh dissonance. I ...


2

There are also psychoaccoustical reasons, the most relevant in this situation being that the critical band is roughly 100 Hz and constant from 500 Hz and below. This means that a C0 (16) and G0 (24) dyad would be within the same critical band and be processed simultanously but a C4 (256) and G4 (384) dyad would be in different critical bands and thus ...


2

Maria, from West Side Story, uses exactly that for the first line.(Not sure if it's that key, but, hey) The underlying harmony is root, the first note is also root, and the tritone is the second , leading to 5th on the 3rd note.. It sounds like it may modulate, as Matt says, but it doesn't. The fact that the triton is a semitone from the target is good, as ...


2

Spacing ("voicing") a chord like that makes the interval between the topmost "seventh" and the melody note a semitone, also called a minor second. A different spacing would change that to a major seventh. Minor seconds sound harsher than major sevenths, because the notes of a minor second usually occupy the same psychoacoustic critical band. That's why, ...


1

This question gets at the how, but right now I don't have a good explanation of the why. To my ear: yes they are. For frequency ratios above ~1.25 you just hear two tones "on top of" one another. Each is identifiable as a separate entity. It is only at the lower ratios that they merge together into a single, more dissonant, sound. I tested this by ...


1

The "vertical" and "horizontal" dimensions are an analogy with conventional western music notation. "Vertical" means the relationship between the different notes of a chord, considered in isolation. "Horizontal" (or "temporal") means the relationship between a chord and the preceding and/or following chords. I'm struggling to understand your difficulty ...


1

More dissonant in higher octaves would contradict the Plomp-Levelt consonance findings†, so may be a psychological effect, or perhaps due to the specific instrument being used? Here's an equal temperament major 7th in a few different octaves run through Plomp-Levelt: % perl -MMusic::Tension::PlompLevelt -E '$t=Music::Tension::PlompLevelt->new; for $c ...


1

Well, this is one of the earliest preludes and fugues of Shostakovich, and actually a quite conservative piece compared to other later ones. For example, try this one: a link For 20th-century composers, prelude and fugue is just a genre. Although the old-school traditions put many limits to polyphonic composition, with the development of music, most of ...


1

Nobody so far has actually discussed stratitis yet. Well, it probably isn't the issue! Before I say why, another thing: pickup damage is almost certainly not the issue either. Symptoms of pickup damage are: Dull sound due to resonance damping by shortcuts between windings. Happens when the isolation is faulty. Loud thudding sound when you touch the ...


1

Would it be accurate to describe your problem as an oscillation sound especially noticeable when using distortion? Making even one string sound out of tune with itself and making it very difficult to intonate the guitar? If that is accurate, lower your neck pickup in a go no go manner until the oscillation is gone. The magnetic field of the pick-up is ...


1

Hmm sounds like possibly you could have a bad pickup? I've had some guitars have great sounding positions, and just one bad one. Usually it was always down to just the pickup itself. I have to ask how old is your Tele? Vintage or new? Also do you happen to know if your pickup pole pieces are Alnico or Ceramic? This can also help to know what could be going ...


1

just a couple of additional comments: To compute a measure of dissonance one should take into account harmonics, i.e. compute all the pairwise contributions to the measureand sum them up (not too hard to do). For chords of more than two pitches you just sum up all the pairwise contributions to the measure, fundamentals and harmonics. Dissonance decreases ...



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