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In general, smaller intervals do not sound as pleasing in a bass register as they do in a treble register. This is a general effect that occurs regardless of whether you play a consonance or a dissonance, although it is more noticeable with dissonances. What happens is that the overtones of the bass notes end up having more noticeable clashes between them, ...


5

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


5

It sounds like you are starting to study harmony and music theory, though. As you progress, things will start to make more sense to you. What makes Shostakovich select such dissonant notes freely? One way of looking at this: composers in a certain period or style eventually start to chafe with the rules of their period, and start to push the envelope. ...


4

Are you talking about the piano here? Because on the piano, even single notes are more dissonant in the bass clef than in the treble clef (look up "disharmonicity") because of the thickness of strings. Also for low frequency you can hear more overtones, and consequently their possible clashes. And also for lower frequencies more beatings are in the ...


4

Even if the b2 interval mentioned in Dan Davis's answer is avoided by using a different voicing, the problem that is usually meant in this context is the b9 interval between the major 7th and the (higher) root note. The b9 interval is considered a very dissonant interval which in traditional jazz harmony is only "allowed" on a dominant seventh chord ...


3

It looks like that bit of information has been in the article since it was written. From the original 2005 article: Often the melody note or other pitched phenomena influences which of the above chord types a performer selects. For example, if the melody note is the root of the chord, including a major seventh can frequently cause a harsh dissonance. I ...


2

Spacing ("voicing") a chord like that makes the interval between the topmost "seventh" and the melody note a semitone, also called a minor second. A different spacing would change that to a major seventh. Minor seconds sound harsher than major sevenths, because the notes of a minor second usually occupy the same psychoacoustic critical band. That's why, ...


2

Maria, from West Side Story, uses exactly that for the first line.(Not sure if it's that key, but, hey) The underlying harmony is root, the first note is also root, and the tritone is the second , leading to 5th on the 3rd note.. It sounds like it may modulate, as Matt says, but it doesn't. The fact that the triton is a semitone from the target is good, as ...


1

Well, this is one of the earliest preludes and fugues of Shostakovich, and actually a quite conservative piece compared to other later ones. For example, try this one: a link For 20th-century composers, prelude and fugue is just a genre. Although the old-school traditions put many limits to polyphonic composition, with the development of music, most of ...


1

Hmm sounds like possibly you could have a bad pickup? I've had some guitars have great sounding positions, and just one bad one. Usually it was always down to just the pickup itself. I have to ask how old is your Tele? Vintage or new? Also do you happen to know if your pickup pole pieces are Alnico or Ceramic? This can also help to know what could be going ...



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