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6

Short answer: Certain effects like overdrives and distortions typically go in front of the amp. Other effects like reverbs and delay typically go in the effects loop (when possible). Long answer: The effects loop on an amp usually sits between the pre-amp and power amp sections. Most of the "tone" of your amp comes from the pre-amp. Pre-amps tend to ...


5

Ok some insight I got from a high-end Mixing Engineer from one of the best recording studios in Germany: With distorted guitars: First get the sound right, then thing about eqs and stuff THEN: Be careful with the high pass: Some Guitars have needed power in the 70-90 hz area (punch, impact). It is often useful to boost this area to give the guitars more ...


5

The K20-X manual has a pretty thorough explanation of how to get overdriven sounds. http://www.deanmarkley.com/Info/LegacyAmps/Manuals/D1015.pdf In brief, an amp like this has two stages of amplification: the first stage "preamp" feeds into the main amplification stage. If you turn up the level of preamp, then there will be some distortion in the preamp ...


5

The conventional usage is to put distortion effect in front of the pre-amp; then, when you engage it, it drives the pre-amp harder, so that you get both the pedal's intrinsic distortion as well as pre-amp distortion. That being said, you should try both positions, and see what you like; there are no hard and fast rules.


4

If I pound on a guitar which has the gain and volume cranked up, you will hear the knocks and they will also cause string vibration. If I have a delay pedal and I tap the "record" button as I am striking the guitar, it will sample and loop that hit, and these hits can be layered, depending on the pedal capabilities. I hear a repeating loop, some sort of ...


4

The problem with distorted guitar sounds is that all the harmonics are accentuated. A pure (clean) guitar note will have some basic harmonics sounding, but they will be 'recognised' and will give you a note to quantify. Given two notes, the harmonics will be heard from both, and depending what the interval is, it will be easy or hard to specify the notes. A ...


4

It's not a problem, it's just lack of training. You need more interval training for your ears. Since you can't make out polyphonic melodies, try training polyphonic intervals. Like an example, play C+E -- F+A -- G+B -- C+E and other similar examples. After a while, try something a bit more difficult. Also, try to change the intervals. In the example I gave ...


2

I looked around for info about this amp and I found this picture of the amp: Based on this picture it looks like the drive switch will give you some distortion, although I doubt it will be the amount you want. This amp does not have the traditional gain knob so customizing the distortion would be hard. I would advise getting a better amp that can handle ...


2

With a couple of my smaller Peaveys, the amp. switch works in conjunction with the footswitch. When the amp. switch is 'on', the footswitch will then toggle between clean/dirty. You may have inadvertently switched the footswitch, which you may or may not usually use.Check the instructions (downloads available) before doing anything drastic. Do not swear at ...


2

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


1

A harsh distorted sound is often caused by harmonics which are too dense. Applying a lowpass removes these harmonics making the sound softer, but this throws the baby out with the bath water, The distorion adds harmonics to the signal and the higher harmonics get very close to each other, forming non-musical intervals. You can mitigate this effect by ...


1

To mute all the unwanted noise from other strings, you should use a combination of pick hand and fret hand muting. The pick hand will mute at least all the strings up to two lower than the one you are playing on. It is possible to mute even the next lower string to the one you are playing with the pick hand, but it can be tricky to do this and not mute the ...


1

If you can't control which strings are sounding, it will be very apparent on an electric versus an acoustic guitar. You're probably noticing it when you use the crunch channel because you're getting a bit of compression so even strings that are not sounding "too much" are quite apparent. I always keep my palm near the bridge if not on it so I can stop ...



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