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11

It's true that distortion, especially heavy distortion causes a lot of compression and evens out most of the dynamics. But a softly picked note is not only quieter, it's also duller, that is, it contains less high frequency, even after distortion. Since we are more sensitive to high frequencies, some dynamics can be achieved just by picking softer or harder. ...


6

Several issues come into play here. I use Jazz III picks, and I am of the opinion that for fast playing, hard picks should be used. There is a possibility that you are using too much gain, or extreme EQ settings which amplify the unwanted noises. Even so, using used picks will produce more noises, since they get a jagged edge. Most important though, is to ...


6

Short answer: Certain effects like overdrives and distortions typically go in front of the amp. Other effects like reverbs and delay typically go in the effects loop (when possible). Long answer: The effects loop on an amp usually sits between the pre-amp and power amp sections. Most of the "tone" of your amp comes from the pre-amp. Pre-amps tend to ...


5

Ok some insight I got from a high-end Mixing Engineer from one of the best recording studios in Germany: With distorted guitars: First get the sound right, then thing about eqs and stuff THEN: Be careful with the high pass: Some Guitars have needed power in the 70-90 hz area (punch, impact). It is often useful to boost this area to give the guitars more ...


5

Controlled feedback is a useful technique although it's as old as Hendrix. I like to use high gain and distortion and a wah so that I can hit a single note and control its feedback crescendo and decrescendo with careful muting. When I do this, I put the wah between the distortion pedal and the guitar. ...


5

The conventional usage is to put distortion effect in front of the pre-amp; then, when you engage it, it drives the pre-amp harder, so that you get both the pedal's intrinsic distortion as well as pre-amp distortion. That being said, you should try both positions, and see what you like; there are no hard and fast rules.


5

When I first started playing the electric guitar seriously, loud pick noise used to be a big problem for me, to the point of obsession (you tend to hear more when you're annoyed with it). Then it gradually disappeared. I think it was all about my bad picking technique; I probably used to hold the pick with too large of an angle. Now I have the ability of ...


5

The K20-X manual has a pretty thorough explanation of how to get overdriven sounds. http://www.deanmarkley.com/Info/LegacyAmps/Manuals/D1015.pdf In brief, an amp like this has two stages of amplification: the first stage "preamp" feeds into the main amplification stage. If you turn up the level of preamp, then there will be some distortion in the preamp ...


4

The problem with distorted guitar sounds is that all the harmonics are accentuated. A pure (clean) guitar note will have some basic harmonics sounding, but they will be 'recognised' and will give you a note to quantify. Given two notes, the harmonics will be heard from both, and depending what the interval is, it will be easy or hard to specify the notes. A ...


4

It's not a problem, it's just lack of training. You need more interval training for your ears. Since you can't make out polyphonic melodies, try training polyphonic intervals. Like an example, play C+E -- F+A -- G+B -- C+E and other similar examples. After a while, try something a bit more difficult. Also, try to change the intervals. In the example I gave ...


4

If I pound on a guitar which has the gain and volume cranked up, you will hear the knocks and they will also cause string vibration. If I have a delay pedal and I tap the "record" button as I am striking the guitar, it will sample and loop that hit, and these hits can be layered, depending on the pedal capabilities. I hear a repeating loop, some sort of ...


4

Playing through a wah wah, and gradually increasing the resonant frequence (creating more "open" vowel sounds) can lend a dynamic effect.


3

To me it has mainly to do with the amount of gain. One other important factor is midrange. The sound of Satisfaction is comparably low in gain, and has some nice bite in the mids. If you compare to e.g. Santana, who could be considered to have a creamy solo sound, he has quite a lot of gain, and not so much midrange. Playing on the neck pickup will produce ...


3

I used to have this when using hard plastic picks, but I swithced to the Dunlop nylon type (.60-.72 mm). Even the thicker ones are ok because the material itself isn't hard, so there's less chance of it causing a racket as it hits the string. As others have stated, skilful picking will get around it. For me, I normally put the pick away when aplying a solo ...


3

You should find the best sound setting on your own. To me their sound is closer to overdrive than distortion. And Barry Stock uses Triaxis preamp, maybe this'll help you


3

Hard picks are often the culprit here. You should try using a softer pick. Pick size vs tonal quality doesn't matter as much with distortion as with jazz tone for example, you really can get away with hitting a string quite softly and still getting adequate volume. I think the pro tone you're referencing is a combination of picking softly (not necessarily ...


2

I looked around for info about this amp and I found this picture of the amp: Based on this picture it looks like the drive switch will give you some distortion, although I doubt it will be the amount you want. This amp does not have the traditional gain knob so customizing the distortion would be hard. I would advise getting a better amp that can handle ...


2

With a couple of my smaller Peaveys, the amp. switch works in conjunction with the footswitch. When the amp. switch is 'on', the footswitch will then toggle between clean/dirty. You may have inadvertently switched the footswitch, which you may or may not usually use.Check the instructions (downloads available) before doing anything drastic. Do not swear at ...


2

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


2

One important observation in the perception of loudness is that our ears perceive single-frequency sounds as louder than more spread-spectrum sounds. Loudness is also associated with the duration of a tone. Therefore, when a guitar tone is heavily distorted, a single, clear, held-out note will sound much louder than the momentary crunch of a palm-muted ...


2

I think the best definition of a bass growl is A strong fundamental combined with a strong midrange overtone. Bass growl is typically found in acoustic standup basses which have wound strings. A strong pluck (pizzicato) will cause the wound strings to rattle against the fingerboard, causing the growl. The wound strings seem to be essential for this ...


2

Without having a proper clip to listen to, I would guess that it is either a overdriven amp or an effects pedal creating that. In a band situation I always found that a fully overdriven bass was too overpowering to be used other than for solos or other distinctive parts (such as the opening from All Around The World by Red Hot Chili Peppers), however ...


2

Well, this is certainly a kind of distortion, but not the kind you get with a fuzz pedal. Fuzz and distortion pedals are characterised by sharp transistor clipping. Rather, the kind of distortion that you hear on old, loud records such as fire comes usually from tube amps that weren't originally meant to sound much distorted at all, but were taken to their ...


1

Hexaphonic MIDI pickups like the Roland GK-3 send a separate signal for each pickup to the 13-pin output jack and, although many processing units will only model a few signal paths (e.g. separating top three and bottom three is pretty common), there are ways to split out each string separately. For example, see separate-strings.co.uk, which is dedicated to ...


1

When it comes to dynamics one of the best things you can do is to listen to a lot of musicians and analyse what they are doing. In a three-piece band each instrument has to carry a lot of musical weight, and for me the classic case study in basic guitar dynamics is probably Nirvana- listen to Nevermind and pay attention to the changes between light and heavy ...


1

It's rather simple. Reduce the Volume knob on your guitar which is meant for your pickup to a limit wher you cannot hear sliding sounds. Then recompensate turning your amplifier gain a bit harder


1

A harsh distorted sound is often caused by harmonics which are too dense. Applying a lowpass removes these harmonics making the sound softer, but this throws the baby out with the bath water, The distorion adds harmonics to the signal and the higher harmonics get very close to each other, forming non-musical intervals. You can mitigate this effect by ...


1

This should answer all of your questions regarding what effects, amps and guitars, both Joey and Frank (Charles) use. http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/20360-rig-rundown-pixies


1

If you prefer a demonstration of how muting can be done by a pro, I suggest Eric Johnson's "Total Electric Guitar" video, where he goes through how to do both left hand and right hand muting in detail.



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