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Depending on the amount of clipping, the waveform of a very distorted signal can approach a square wave. Mathematically, a square wave is an infinite sum of overtones, with each higher overtone at a lower intensity than the previous. Near the bottom of this page is the infinite sum of a mathematically exact square wave: ...


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No, there's nothing wrong with your amp. Only, remember that the tone of any guitar amp is shaped by all of its three main components: The preamp section, including the gain, tone controls and channel selectors (if any). This is usually the only section where you can tweak the sound, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the most important for the final ...


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The fact that you DI the guitar doesn't change the differnce between distorted single coils or humbuckers, so if you're thinking of getting a SG or Les Paul etc for nicer distortion, that'll still be the case if you DI. Strats have a nice clear kind of distortion wheras Humbuckers are better for pure grunt. I'm not sure of the science behind it but the ...


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The pickups aren't the only part of an electric guitar that affect the sound in noticeable ways. Construction of the body and the neck are high on the list, as are hardware items like the type of bridge, nut material, and so on. Even with just the electronics the specs of the tone and volume controls are a factor. If you like the previous work of the ...


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If you want the sound of a humbucker, you need to get one. Emulations using single coils will not do. Sure, you could play around with EQs and compressors and maybe get you in the ballpark, but it will always be noticeable. If you have to have only one guitar and want to get the widest range of sounds, your best bet would be humbuckers with coil split ...


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Lending an amp to someone is often a very bad idea, because you risk a lot. Guitar amps are quite sensitive, cranking them up can seriously damage them. You should bring your amp to a guitar shop to let someone check it out... However, before doing that, it might also be that your setting is messed up. Check if your gain is high enough and neutralize your ...


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First I would say try a more rounded pick and see if it helps you achieve the sound you want. I personally never got used to the pointy edge of a jazz III. For a thick rounder pick I'd recommend tortex .88 It might help, and if it doesn't you only spend 50 cents!. Secondly, the absolutely hands down best way to improve the "sound production" aspect of ...



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