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17

Your description at the end is pretty close to the default (assuming right handed) for a rock kit, which is the most commonly used setup. There are other standard kit setups such as Jazz Kits see @Eric K's answer for a description of a Jazz kit. So for a "standard" rock kit you'd have: Snare between your legs usually just above knee height on your left Hi ...


13

Your first kit should not break the bank, nor should it be highly specialized. It is simply a kit you will use to gain skill in drumming, and also to illustrate what you personally do and don't want in a drum kit. Different woods, skins, and cymbal construction will all contribute subtle tonal differences, all at the same (high) pricepoint. Making all of ...


12

Yes, there are several things that are different: You'll find out that a real drum and a real cymbal produce much more variants in sound than the electronic version, depending on many parameters of your stroke (where you hit, how hard you hit, what kind of stick you have, how tight you hold the stick). It is a challenge, but also a possibility. You cannot ...


11

Subdivide the 8 beats in unorthodox ways. For example: Coldplay's "Clocks" subdivides 8 beats into a 3-3-2 rhythm. Not exactly groundbreaking, but a bit different from the usual. You can take that idea and run wild with it. Here are some ideas: Re-arrange the more familiar 3-3-2 subdivision into 3-2-3, which is a bit more unusual. 3-5. Play a beat in ...


11

Professional electronic drum kits are made by many musical instrument manufacturers including Roland, Yamaha, Alesis, ddrum, Simmons, and even the Zildjian cymbal company. The link in the previous sentence goes to a list of kits sold at Guitar Center. These are all "silent" in that they make no sound acoustically (however you can hear the sound of your drum ...


11

Actually, the fact that you've analyzed your playing to the point where you can describe where you're going wrong means you're halfway there, so good job so far. Some additional practice suggestions: Try feeling macrobeats: instead of listening for a pulse on every beat, listen for every two beats, or every full measure--thus de-emphasizing the snare:beat ...


9

Will approach this from the standpoint of drums, but the same advice applies to amps and other backline equipment. Communication The best way to handle this would be for the stage manager to get in touch with the owner of the drum kit and clear adjustments ahead of time. If you know who these people are ahead of time, some emails and phone calls can go a ...


9

Traditional Grip Pros: Very common in Marching Percussion Looks 'cooler' (subjective) Easy to play on a tilted drum, harder to play on a level drum. Easier to play very soft as you are pulling the stick down instead of pushing it. Traditional Grip Cons: Harder to keep both of your Right and Left hand sounding the same. Slightly more difficult to ...


9

These are known as stickings. Use only one row of stickings at a time. Depending on context, a repeat sign as well as a set of alternate stickings could mean either to play one sticking and then switch to the other on the second time, or to choose a sticking but use the same sticking throughout. Your no. 8 example, for instance offers a basic alternating ...


8

If you can't hear the click because it falls right underneath your strokes, that's called "burying the click", and it's generally a good thing. If your stroke is consistently just before the click, that's referred to as playing "ahead of the beat"; If your stroke is just after the click, it's called playing "behind the beat". Both are valid techniques to ...


8

Yes, there are electronic drums. There will be a tapping sound when playing. This will likely not disturb your neighbors, but your room mate might find it disturbing. I believe that playing with brushes is problematic, but I'm not updated on the technical advancements of electronic drums.


8

All of the instruments can define the beat, but in order the most important (in a typical 4 piece) are - drums, bass, rhythm guitar, lead guitar. You can define a laid back beat just with the drums - if everyone else plays as normal, but you swing your beats, you will get a much more fluid feel to a piece. To do this well requires the band to work well ...


8

Obviously, headphones are the very first thing to recommend if you aren't already using them. A good pair of noise-cancelling headphones works both ways; you can be thumpin' it at 95dB and nobody but you will hear it. The sound produced by you hitting a rubber pad with a drumstick is a dull thunk, typically quieter than an ordinary conversation. If you have ...


8

Here are some thoughts: I would absolutely avoid using pillows / towels as a practice set for many obvious reasons. Since you have an electronic kit, noise should not be an issue - you can either turn the volume way down, or plug in the kit to headphones and hear yourself that way through analog. You could purchase practice pads to go over your kit drums ...


8

You could try switching to oak sticks: they're much harder on the hands, but they are stronger and more rigid. Apart from that, the usual advice is to avoid hitting the rim of a cymbal. It's bad for the cymbals as well as the sticks. If you're trying to play louder, hit the cymbal with the stick parallel to the surface, so the contact area is huge. The ...


8

It's easy to think that a short sound just needs a blob on the music, but it's easier to count through the bars if each one has the prescribed number of beats. Imagine a snare on 2 and 4. If the rests on 1 and 3 weren't marked, you may well think that the first snare hit was on 1. Who knows? Whilst most drum sounds are short, cymbals can ring for a whole ...


7

As with mastering any technique, you need to practice ... a lot. That said, I would also suggest you try changing the angle of the snare drum a little bit. Try a few different angles to see if you can find one that results in hitting the perfect rimshot more reliably. For instance, if you are consistently hitting only the rim, then it may help to ...


7

In addition to good advice already given, if you want to plan your drum part and be very rigorous about it: drums can be used for emphasis, introduction, warning. Just before the melody and the lyrics are played and singed louder, or accelerating, etc. the percussion can prepare the listener and warn him something is going to happen. drums can be used as a ...


7

Listen! Listen to the music what it needs and listen to other drummers playing the same styles and you'll learn a lot. For a rock band, you usually want to keep a strong backbeat on 2 and 4, so you don't have much choice on the snare drum except for adding some ghost notes here and there. Variations on the bass drum and on the hi-hat pattern are possible of ...


7

When you're learning, the main choice you make is, do you want to become "good enough" (where good enough is defined by you, for whatever situation you're in), or do you want to become as good as you can? Either choice is fine. Just realize that your drum teacher is being paid to make you as good as you can be; unsurprisingly, learning general music theory ...


7

Staff music, and indeed pretty much any system of musical or rhythmic notation, is just a means to an end. You are free to invent any system you want, borrowing symbols from any discipline or making them up as you go. As long as they have meaning to you, that's the most important thing. Since you don't want sheet music (understandable, given that sheet ...


7

It really depends on the style of music. If you're playing military or orchestral music, with lots of rolls, you'll probably find a wooden stick rebounds better from the snare drum, making it easier to play. On the other hand, because wood has a grain, wooden tips give you a slightly different sound depending on the rotation of the stick around its long ...


7

What you learn in Rock Band is close to real drumming, but there are limitations. To the game, you either hit the drum on time, or you don't. It has no concept of dynamics or tone. So you could learn to play a part such that Rock Band would give you a perfect score, but it would sound awful. Rock Band doesn't teach you technique. It's happy to give you a ...


7

Stephen Hazel is correct- and the sound is different. The Closed Hi-hat sound is a short sharp metallic sound (as I'm sure you know) but the foot hi-hat is a bit quiter and has a slightly less metallic sound, a bit more gentle. As the hi-hat closes, one part of the hi-hat rim will normally meet the other first (as opposed to the whole rim meeting at once ...


7

The 107 defines the tempo(speed) of the song. If you see a metronome, you'll see that you can determine the speed. The speed of the specific song is 107 bpm (beats per minute). Also, you can see that the duration of the note is a quarter. That means that if you set your metronome at 107 bpm, every tic would be a quarter. So, the correct name for this would ...


7

I'm guessing this is from guitar tab, with 6 lines. The 6/8 really means 2 beats per bar, made up with 3 triplet quavers (1/8 notes). This will give each bar only 2 beats, despite numbers like 6 and 8.The tempo mark found above tells how many b.p.m. (beats per minute) the tune should be played at, In this case, 107. A metronome can be set to this, and every ...


7

Using a practice pad is common among drummers, and you certainly can learn e.g. hand independence and basic drum patterns without playing on a complete kit. I believe it will be possible to make progress in this way. At some point real kit playing will be more beneficial, but for learning the basics, it will be enough to use a practice pad.


7

I think the best would be to get an electronic drum set. It isn't really huge and it isn't really loud. You can use headphones, so no one can listen to what you are playing. Of course the practice pad would help, but a real drum set would be much much better and would help you develop faster (In my experience). Does the device that you mentioned have a ...


6

Anyone else have any ideas/methods for increasing ambidexterity for stick control? I don't really see what your problem with having one hand stronger than the other is. There is never a requirement to have both hands equally good when playing; all you need is for both of them to be good enough for what they need to do. If the dominant hand just happens ...


6

I would consider above all the rhythm and timing, how it "feels" with the rest of the instruments. As a drummer, I find it very difficult to take a recording away and attempt to come up with a specific rhythm. I find it much easier to play along with the band and see where I can fit in and add to the overall feeling of the song. I think playing what sounds ...



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