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43

This is not always true. While most bar bands have this set up, if you go to many large concerts (for instance the Eagles concert tour), you will often find many percussionists working simultaneously. But on average, and for most typical bands, I'd say you're correct. And while I can't give a scientific reason, I can give my general opinions and at no ...


24

It reduces volume, but usually the desired effect is to remove excessive ringing. If you listen to the snare on the St. Anger record by Metallica, you'll hear the type of sounds some drummers want to mitigate with the use of tape or other dampers. This technique can be used on toms too. There it's usually not the high pitched ring of the snare, but lower ...


18

Your description at the end is pretty close to the default (assuming right handed) for a rock kit, which is the most commonly used setup. There are other standard kit setups such as Jazz Kits see @Eric K's answer for a description of a Jazz kit. So for a "standard" rock kit you'd have: Snare between your legs usually just above knee height on your left Hi ...


17

I'll add pictures to precise the answer of Meaningful Username ;) This is more for sound mitigation : This is more for tone control (to reduce some harmonies) : Since this answer is appreciated, I'll add that some drummers prefer (and advise) to use gaffer instead of duct tape to avoid adhesive residues. Duct tape uses natural adhesive where gaffer ...


14

Your first kit should not break the bank, nor should it be highly specialized. It is simply a kit you will use to gain skill in drumming, and also to illustrate what you personally do and don't want in a drum kit. Different woods, skins, and cymbal construction will all contribute subtle tonal differences, all at the same (high) pricepoint. Making all of ...


14

Drums have pitches, but by the time they are in the track, then unless it is for very specific purposes, to complement a melodic line etc, then those actual pitches should not be truly apparent to the end-listener. Let the listener just get the 'vibe' of what you intend. They shouldn't really be hearing a 'tune' from the drum pitches, only the apparent ...


12

Professional electronic drum kits are made by many musical instrument manufacturers including Roland, Yamaha, Alesis, ddrum, Simmons, and even the Zildjian cymbal company. The link in the previous sentence goes to a list of kits sold at Guitar Center. These are all "silent" in that they make no sound acoustically (however you can hear the sound of your drum ...


12

Yes, there are several things that are different: You'll find out that a real drum and a real cymbal produce much more variants in sound than the electronic version, depending on many parameters of your stroke (where you hit, how hard you hit, what kind of stick you have, how tight you hold the stick). It is a challenge, but also a possibility. You cannot ...


12

I made a diagram for you, showing the bell, the bow, and the rim.


11

Subdivide the 8 beats in unorthodox ways. For example: Coldplay's "Clocks" subdivides 8 beats into a 3-3-2 rhythm. Not exactly groundbreaking, but a bit different from the usual. You can take that idea and run wild with it. Here are some ideas: Re-arrange the more familiar 3-3-2 subdivision into 3-2-3, which is a bit more unusual. 3-5. Play a beat in ...


11

Actually, the fact that you've analyzed your playing to the point where you can describe where you're going wrong means you're halfway there, so good job so far. Some additional practice suggestions: Try feeling macrobeats: instead of listening for a pulse on every beat, listen for every two beats, or every full measure--thus de-emphasizing the snare:beat ...


11

I'm not a drummer, but from what I've read... closed hihat is hitting it with the stick while your foot holds it closed. foot hihat is stomping the pedal so the top and bottom crash together.


10

Percussion, by definition, includes pitched percussion. So it sounds like you're looking specifically for "non pitched percussion music". Some descripting terms that come to mind might be drum circle, drum line, rhythm music, street beats, african drumming.


10

Anyone else have any ideas/methods for increasing ambidexterity for stick control? I don't really see what your problem with having one hand stronger than the other is. There is never a requirement to have both hands equally good when playing; all you need is for both of them to be good enough for what they need to do. If the dominant hand just happens ...


10

Try using a watch. That's what a lot of orchestra conductors do. It's fairly easy to train yourself to find a beat by just looking at a watch for a couple seconds. Since a watch will give you 60bpm, subdivide the tick to get 30bpm increments or subdivide twice to get 15bpm increments. Once you get the hang of it, you don't need a metronome.


10

Traditional Grip Pros: Very common in Marching Percussion Looks 'cooler' (subjective) Easy to play on a tilted drum, harder to play on a level drum. Easier to play very soft as you are pulling the stick down instead of pushing it. Traditional Grip Cons: Harder to keep both of your Right and Left hand sounding the same. Slightly more difficult to ...


10

Staff music, and indeed pretty much any system of musical or rhythmic notation, is just a means to an end. You are free to invent any system you want, borrowing symbols from any discipline or making them up as you go. As long as they have meaning to you, that's the most important thing. Since you don't want sheet music (understandable, given that sheet ...


10

I can certainly explain why there aren't many rock bands with multiple drummers. Because every garage band practices in the drummer's garage. The drummer can't fit the drum set in the back of his mom's Celica, so everyone else else comes over to his house. Plus, even when the van is working, it's a pain to lug the set around. Much easier with guitars ...


10

I don't see why you wouldn't be able to achieve all of your goals within a year - they are a perfectly reasonable. 1.5hrs of practice a day is a typical average of many college musicians, but I digress. Let me address your questions directly: Is it possible, within my barriers, to achieve my goals? What would a weekday excercise (1.5 hours) look ...


9

Listen! Listen to the music what it needs and listen to other drummers playing the same styles and you'll learn a lot. For a rock band, you usually want to keep a strong backbeat on 2 and 4, so you don't have much choice on the snare drum except for adding some ghost notes here and there. Variations on the bass drum and on the hi-hat pattern are possible of ...


9

Will approach this from the standpoint of drums, but the same advice applies to amps and other backline equipment. Communication The best way to handle this would be for the stage manager to get in touch with the owner of the drum kit and clear adjustments ahead of time. If you know who these people are ahead of time, some emails and phone calls can go a ...


9

Yes, there are electronic drums. There will be a tapping sound when playing. This will likely not disturb your neighbors, but your room mate might find it disturbing. I believe that playing with brushes is problematic, but I'm not updated on the technical advancements of electronic drums.


9

These are known as stickings. Use only one row of stickings at a time. Depending on context, a repeat sign as well as a set of alternate stickings could mean either to play one sticking and then switch to the other on the second time, or to choose a sticking but use the same sticking throughout. Your no. 8 example, for instance offers a basic alternating ...


9

You could try switching to oak sticks: they're much harder on the hands, but they are stronger and more rigid. Apart from that, the usual advice is to avoid hitting the rim of a cymbal. It's bad for the cymbals as well as the sticks. If you're trying to play louder, hit the cymbal with the stick parallel to the surface, so the contact area is huge. The ...


9

No. I'm an accomplished drummer but I can't play Rock Band for toffee. Rock Band is a game, so it's designed to present a challenge to the user, one that's accessible to and enjoyable for adults and children with no musical knowledge. For this reason, it omits some things that are a big part of playing drums in an ensemble: Volume. By this I don't just ...


8

A metronome for count-in is best but you can also use a device on your drumkit that will tell you what your current tempo is. It's called a Beat Bug.


8

I am a band director with a degree in percussion performance and played and taught Drum and Bugle corp a long time. I am an expert on drumming rudiments. I first learned traditional grip and later switched to matched grip. I now use both of grips, because each has its own advantages. Traditional Grip: it is easier to produce a double or multiple bounce ...


8

If you can't hear the click because it falls right underneath your strokes, that's called "burying the click", and it's generally a good thing. If your stroke is consistently just before the click, that's referred to as playing "ahead of the beat"; If your stroke is just after the click, it's called playing "behind the beat". Both are valid techniques to ...


8

All of the instruments can define the beat, but in order the most important (in a typical 4 piece) are - drums, bass, rhythm guitar, lead guitar. You can define a laid back beat just with the drums - if everyone else plays as normal, but you swing your beats, you will get a much more fluid feel to a piece. To do this well requires the band to work well ...


8

Obviously, headphones are the very first thing to recommend if you aren't already using them. A good pair of noise-cancelling headphones works both ways; you can be thumpin' it at 95dB and nobody but you will hear it. The sound produced by you hitting a rubber pad with a drumstick is a dull thunk, typically quieter than an ordinary conversation. If you have ...



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