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Musically, I think the reason is... Guitarists provide different things: rhythm (bass and rhythm guitar), harmony (rhythm guitar) and melody (mostly solo guitar). Also, we need bass and rhythm guitar because of different pitch they provide. Drums provide only one thing: rhythm. Other percussion instruments (like congos in Latin music) add to that, but it's ...


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Sounds like you are already somewhat familiar with Band in a Box. It will do exactly what you want - and the more up-to-date versions have "RealDrums", which are sampled snippets played by real human drummers on real drums that can be arranged into song tracks. They come in a variety of styles, with more being released every once in a while. Just mute the ...


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Guitarists are two a penny - drummers are a rarer breed.


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While many other valid points have been made here, IMHO it all comes down to LOUDNESS. The signature tones of rock n roll guitar--distortion and overdrive--are said to have originated because early electric guitarists had to "max out" their primitive amplifiers in order to be heard over the drumset. Yelling and screaming as "vocal styles" likely evolved in ...


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I can't believe no one has mentioned Adam and the Ants. It's simple logistics, there are brazillions of guitar players, a lot of bass players and a handful of drummers in most localities. (A decent drummer, who has their own van is gold dust) Any good drummer is usually in more than one band. Also, most material is written by the guys at the front who ...


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I can certainly explain why there aren't many rock bands with multiple drummers. Because every garage band practices in the drummer's garage. The drummer can't fit the drum set in the back of his mom's Celica, so everyone else else comes over to his house. Plus, even when the van is working, it's a pain to lug the set around. Much easier with guitars ...


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The question specifically addresses culture, so... here goes. Drums are complicated and cumbersome. Keyboardists and guitarists are more portable and greater in number. Culturally, this can lead to friction with drummers (see Pete Best, etc) as drummers are often known for being... well, they like to be in control, because technically they set the beat and, ...


3

I can only think of two rock-oriented bands with two drummers: The Allman Brothers Band and the Grateful Dead. In both cases, as I understand it, there's one drummer (Bill Kreutzmann for the Dead, Butch Trucks for the ABB) who is primarily responsible for the timekeeping and another (Mickey Hart, Jaimoe) who focus more on providing flourishes and a greater ...


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Bands like the Doobie Brothers and The Allman Brothers did (do?) have two drummers. One reason is that drums are, largely, one-dimensional musically speaking - they provide only rhythm without pitch. Guitars can provide both. So you can do more with guitars, like having a background rhythm with one while a more lead part with the other, e.g., listen to the ...


5

Apart from the fact that one drummer can produce enough volume to compete with guitarists, even with a big rig,every sound he produces on the drums, and even on the hi-hat, is a short sound. With two drummers, each 'note' they play will have to be timed more accurately than, say, chords on a guitar.This should be easy to accomplish, but my experience says ...


32

This is not always true. While most bar bands have this set up, if you go to many large concerts (for instance the Eagles concert tour), you will often find many percussionists working simultaneously. But on average, and for most typical bands, I'd say you're correct. And while I can't give a scientific reason, I can give my general opinions and at no ...


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@MrTheBard The amazing thing about mic placement is just how unpredictable it can be. I'm not kidding, the best snare sound I ever got (well, my drummer, actually) was from the mic of a laptop. I'm not suggesting this will always work, though, quite the opposite. It's always different. Try to have fun experimenting with as many combinations as you have time ...


3

I have been doing a simlar thing for my (rock) band quite a while, with good results. Our drum kit is simple : bass, snare, 2 x tom, hi-hat and cymbals. When recording for studio work, I use 7 mics : Bass, Snare(above - to get the drum note) and snare (below- to get the actual snare), Tom1, Tom2 and a pair of "overheads" above the kit, about 4 or 5 feet ...


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If you're going to record each part separately ( a good move, recording wise), then two mics will do the job - record each instrument in stereo (two channel) and mix down at the end. For this, two mics will suffice, so I'd go for condenser mics that would need phantom power. For this, you'll need XLRs, so make sure two of these are available. You would use ...


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If you only want to record the drums, it depends on what's kind of your drums. If you have standard drums with: snare, 2 toms, 1 floor toms, bass-kick, hi-hat, ride, and a crash, maybe you need 8 mics for drums. But, you said: I need to record drums, guitars, vocals, and bass. So, you need more inputs. Or maybe you can put the drums' mic into a direct-box ...


3

It depends on what kind of sound you are looking for. With two or three well placed mics, if you have the time and the ears to experiment a lot, you can get a pretty reasonable drum recording as good as anything that was recorded prior to the 70's explosion in tech equipment. I have been in many recording situations where we did just that for stylistic ...


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In general, look for a phrase that's being repeated. This is the main "building block" for each part of a song. When you've identified the phrase you know when the bar starts and ends. Next, try to count within the bar. The best first guess, as others have indicated, is trying to count to 4 along with some notes played (e.g. notes accented by the bass ...


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Theoretically if you master this roll, there should be no difference between the two versions you mention, so it's of course good to practice both versions. However, as others already have indicated there are other considerations. I'll add another: from what I know, this exercise, among others similar, is also an introduction to playing tremolo with double ...


5

At this stage, it's learning how to control the bounce of the stick - the second hit comes straight after the first, same hand, but after a bounce. Doing it this way also frees up the right hand after the roll, to maybe hit a crash. Alternating puts the last hit with right hand, so cuts down on time to reach a cymbal. However, every roll or fill you learn ...


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That depends on what you mean with "different tune". It will sound different for sure, which you probably have noticed, and it will not be the intended exercise.



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