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0

I know you wanted to avoid it, but it sounds like any solution may be far more trouble than its worth, so just go with a click on the actual loop. But if you definitely want it in sync with the internal click I would try these out... Use a midi out from your drums, set its clock to master. Midi in to your DAW, set clock to external. Set the bpm you want ...


0

If you are playing piano with a teacher, you will be learning about dynamics and phrasing (volume of each individual note in a unit of time) and will have made the first steps on how to apply this when you move to real drums. If you are using expert mode on the harder songs, the game can help you learn rhythms much quicker than listening to your favourite ...


3

It depends on how you want to use the cowbell. I usually attach it to the top of the hihat pin or the ride cymbal, when I use it as a substitute for the ride, hitting it on every quarter/half note, for instance. Many drummers use this location for various percussion instruments such as tambourines. Woodblocks follow this pattern: they are often used where ...


0

You might try Mapex. For that money, I think you could land a Mapex set, and I think you do have some choice as far as finish/lacquer. I used to own a Mapex mid-range kit. Not bad for the price.


2

To add to what's here: Ride cymbals will not be very loud when struck (comparitively), but will have overtones that last for much longer than crash cymbals. Crash cymbals, for the most part, are meant to accent the beat - be loud when hit, then fade quickly. If you hit both very hard, across the edge of your stick, listen to see what is still ringing many ...


0

For shame. You have all overlooked (the) Melvins. Dale Crover and Coady Willis. If you don't know, you should look into this.


0

Drumsticks are not designed to take impacts over a small surface area. (that is, all of the force of your strike placed either at the tip, or along the shaft of the stick) Good drumming ergonomics require the proper setup of your drums and cymbals. Toms and the snare should be positioned so that the drums make contact with a large surface area of the stick. ...


1

I've been playing for over 20 years. I've tried playing with various gloves and tapes/wraps. Nothing works as well (or feels as good) as playing with nothing between you and the drumstick. I've owned a leather stick bag for nearly 20 years now, and I think it makes the difference. If I take a set of sticks right out of the paper sheath, sure they'll be ...


-1

I am proof you can learn to play the drums through rock band. I have an Alesis Dm 10 and not only learned how to play through the game, but now play with a band of my friends after 3 months of me playing the game. Its all memory once the game is off. The timing is also memory. There are career goals in the training section that teaches rudiments and is every ...


2

There are some techniques that can only really be done in matched (freehand), other things that can only be done in traditional (lots of brush stuff, certain finger control techniques). The greatest benefit of traditional grip is that you can vary the angle of attack between the drumstick and whatever surface you're playing on (therefore changing the ...


1

To an extent, you can practice on anything which has the right kind of 'bounce back' for the sticks. You don't even need that iof you're just practicing getting things in the right order. It helps if you have two objects with different sounds, so you can hear differences if practicing strokes between the two, eg like a paradiddle etc. However for practicing ...


1

There are hand held recorders, which have built in mic's but also let you record external mic's or line in. I use a Roland R-26, but Zoom has a line of quite popular and lower priced recorders. They seem to have a pretty good bang/buck ratio. The benefit of this solution is that they record the sound from your drums quite naturally without having to bother ...


5

Get a decent cheap 4 channel mixer, the Behringer Euroracks or any other inexpensive mixer with 3 XLR inputs will do fine. The 4th channel is for your backing tracks. Get three mics, one short mic stand and two boom mic stands. Get a decent set of sealed headphones. For a recorder use whatever digital recorder takes your fancy: your camera, a Zoom, even ...



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