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The name I was looking for is Gary Chester, and its not a technique, its a method of trainning on hit-hat.


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Here is a technique that appears similar to what you are asking about. The person who originated the technique is Sanford Moeller and it is now known as the Moeller Technique. It has been extensively taught by a drum teacher named Jim Chapin. You will find many YouTube videos on using the Moeller Technique. Here is a video of someone demonstrating ...


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A lot depends what you mean by bad or disgusting. What sounds bad to you might sound great to someone else, but there are a few things you should think about. Rooms tend to be hard edged, and rectangular - and this means you get reverberations at frequencies which fit into the space, as the sounds reflect off the walls. You also have that fireplace and the ...


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+1 to making yourself a metronome slave and self-recording. One exercise I did as a kid was clapping along to metronome beats. If I was successful, I couldn't hear the metronome click, only the clap. Another trick I try to keep myself in the habit of (especially when counting off, but also when playing) is subdividing in my head, or silently with my mouth ...


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The metronome is always a great place to start. But to improve your non-metronomic time keeping, here's a neat little exercise. Find a metronome where you can silence subdivisions or beats, preferably from a whole phrase. Then set a phrase to play in 4/4 for however many bars you want. I like sixteen. Mute the last bar and see how you come back in on the ...


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The way you do it is called "matched grip" because the hands are the same, and the other way is called "traditional grip". Traditional has been used for centuries for military drumming: Notice the way the drums are tilted--this keeps them from being tripped over, but it would be impossible to play with a matched grip due to the angle. Nowadays some ...


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I think that every one has his/her own God given talent. There is a difference between someone who has the talent to play drums and someone who, by one way or the other, learns the skill. The person who God has given the talent will find it easier to play than the other who learned it from somewhere. I have an example to back thus up: in the Holy Bible, God ...


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When I'm playing with traditional grip, The stick barely rests on my ring finger on the upstroke, but still controlled by my middle finger. The stick lays on my ring finger above the top knuckle, next to the fingernail. Here's a photo I found that shows a grip technique very similar to mine (on the left hand anyway - I don't know what's up with that right ...


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I am able do this by suspending my foot over the bass drum pedal with my heel up, and using only my toes to contact the pedal. The technique is shown in this video (not my video). Experiment with spring tension changes as well. youtube.com/watch?v=11gLbvLb1yg


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Edit I didn't realise YouTube links would naturally inline. I've inlined them all now, for easy ref. I had a look at the instruction video mentioned by Matthew Brings - & also ...


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Simply, he had a fast foot. Put in your 10,000 hours and you'll be fine. There is no special technique here other than strength, dexterity, and grace.


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I would separate the sense of rhythm from the distinct skill of limb-independence. What you are actually trying to achieve right now isn't timing, or rhythm, it's the separation of one task [hands] from another [feet] With no sense of rhythm whatsoever, you can practise patting your head & rubbing your stomach… then swap hands! Once you can do that ...


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Our normal setup on the drum-kit in our church (a conference room holding up to 300) is: Kick drum Snare 2/3 tom 2 overheads, on stands placed either side of the kick Some times we don't bother with the overheads and I haven't noticed any problems.


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Yes, you absolutely can. As with so many things, this is not a black-or-white thing. There's not some kind of gene that says you'll either be a master at playing the drums, or totally suck at it. Many things come into play here: The ability to concentrate. The ability to control your motions accurately. Eye-hand coordination. Stamina. Willpower. These ...


1

Quick and dirty solution: record your MP3 twice, once with a click, once without. Use the version with a click, instead of the drum module's internal click. More technical solution: synchronise your drum module's tempo with your DAW using MIDI.



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