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@MrTheBard The amazing thing about mic placement is just how unpredictable it can be. I'm not kidding, the best snare sound I ever got (well, my drummer, actually) was from the mic of a laptop. I'm not suggesting this will always work, though, quite the opposite. It's always different. Try to have fun experimenting with as many combinations as you have time ...


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I have been doing a simlar thing for my (rock) band quite a while, with good results. Our drum kit is simple : bass, snare, 2 x tom, hi-hat and cymbals. When recording for studio work, I use 7 mics : Bass, Snare(above - to get the drum note) and snare (below- to get the actual snare), Tom1, Tom2 and a pair of "overheads" above the kit, about 4 or 5 feet ...


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If you're going to record each part separately ( a good move, recording wise), then two mics will do the job - record each instrument in stereo (two channel) and mix down at the end. For this, two mics will suffice, so I'd go for condenser mics that would need phantom power. For this, you'll need XLRs, so make sure two of these are available. You would use ...


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If you only want to record the drums, it depends on what's kind of your drums. If you have standard drums with: snare, 2 toms, 1 floor toms, bass-kick, hi-hat, ride, and a crash, maybe you need 8 mics for drums. But, you said: I need to record drums, guitars, vocals, and bass. So, you need more inputs. Or maybe you can put the drums' mic into a direct-box ...


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It depends on what kind of sound you are looking for. With two or three well placed mics, if you have the time and the ears to experiment a lot, you can get a pretty reasonable drum recording as good as anything that was recorded prior to the 70's explosion in tech equipment. I have been in many recording situations where we did just that for stylistic ...


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In general, look for a phrase that's being repeated. This is the main "building block" for each part of a song. When you've identified the phrase you know when the bar starts and ends. Next, try to count within the bar. The best first guess, as others have indicated, is trying to count to 4 along with some notes played (e.g. notes accented by the bass ...


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Theoretically if you master this roll, there should be no difference between the two versions you mention, so it's of course good to practice both versions. However, as others already have indicated there are other considerations. I'll add another: from what I know, this exercise, among others similar, is also an introduction to playing tremolo with double ...


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At this stage, it's learning how to control the bounce of the stick - the second hit comes straight after the first, same hand, but after a bounce. Doing it this way also frees up the right hand after the roll, to maybe hit a crash. Alternating puts the last hit with right hand, so cuts down on time to reach a cymbal. However, every roll or fill you learn ...


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That depends on what you mean with "different tune". It will sound different for sure, which you probably have noticed, and it will not be the intended exercise.



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